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Donya Blaze

Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer On The Myth of Viral Strategy

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Nowadays, everyone wants more for less –  newspapers without paywalls, every book ever published available for free on Google Books, and consumers who are such fanatics for your brands that they’ll do your marketing for you.  (That’s what Twitter and YouTube are for, right?)

Well, Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer says the quick and easy way isn’t always the best one.

“If you’re using [a viral strategy] as code for ‘I don’t want to spend a lot of money to get a lot of reach,’ then you’re going to be out of luck,” he said in the final installment of our Media Beat interview. “What we’re finding is one thing can help get more content seen by more people (and it’s the same thing that’s always helped get more content seen by more people),  and that’s money –  paid distribution.”

“If you really wanna guarantee yourself a lot of viewership, just pay for it. You’re already paying for a lot of other things.”

Part 1: Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer: ‘We Struck Gold’ With Mad Men Yourself

Part 2: Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer: ‘We’re Hiring Creatives At Every Level’

Ian Schafer talks about best practices for social media marketing in his keynote presentation at Socialize on April 1 in New York. You can also watch this video on the mediabistro.com YouTube channel.

Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer: ‘We’re Hiring Creatives At Every Level’

Socialize 2011 banner

When Ian Schafer started his interactive agency Deep Focus, his goal was to “bust the silos” of traditional marketing, meaning find ways to market to consumers across media verticals rather than simply within them. Now that the boutique agency has been going nine years strong, the CEO reveals what you can do to get a job with his company.

“We’re hiring creatives at every level,” he said in our Media Beat interview. “The challenging part about finding people for us right now is that, while we love specialists, what we really want are what the industry would call ‘T-shaped people.’ People with kind of a broad understanding, a generalist perspective, but an expertise in a particular vertical.”

If you’d rather start your own agency, says Schafer, you better be a people person.

“This business, I’m finding, is definitely personality-led,” he explained. “So, if you’re demure, if you don’t like to network, if you don’t like to tweet, then it’s going to make it that much more difficult for you.”

Part 1: Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer: ‘We Struck Gold’ With Mad Men Yourself

Part 3: Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer On The Myth of Viral Strategy

Ian Schafer talks about best practices for social media marketing in his keynote presentation at Socialize on April 1 in New York. You can also watch this video on the mediabistro.com YouTube channel.

Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer: ‘We Struck Gold’ With Mad Men Yourself

Socialize 2011 banner

In this week’s Media Beat interview, mediabistro.com’s Carmen Scheidel spoke with Ian Schafer of interactive agency Deep Focus about the success of its Mad Men Yourself campaign. Note to all copycats: creating a Don Draper avatar may look easy, but it’s actually the result of a lot of work and strategic research.

“We knew we had to build something that would turn a die-hard group of viewers that were really only talking to each other about the show, and get them to do something that involved others. We struck gold with that, and we continue to revitalize that every year,” Schafer explained. “It is one of those bright, shiny objects that attracts clients to us, and typically they say, ‘I want one of those.’ We have to educate them on the fact that we didn’t just come up with that idea out of thin air.”

Part 2: Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer: ‘We’re Hiring Creatives At Every Level’

Part 3: Deep Focus CEO Ian Schafer On The Myth of Viral Strategy

Ian Schafer talks about best practices for social media marketing in his keynote presentation at Socialize on April 1 in New York. You can also watch this video on the mediabistro.com YouTube channel.

Media Beat: Abbey Klaassen on Ad Age’s Early Move Into Pay Walls

While The New York Times is reportedly experimenting with a pay wall for its web site, the folks at Advertising Age actually adopted one for their campaign hubs, Creativity and AdCritic, years ago. In the final installment of our Media Beat interview, executive editor Abbey Klaassen says it’s been a trial-and-error pay wall strategy with those offshoots, which began as “locked down” content and switched to a free model before reverting back to paid access.

“The strategy was let’s go seven days free and after that, you hit a pay wall,” she explains. “That wasn’t an economic model that worked for us, so we’re trying to find a happy medium here.”

Watch the video to find out which online business model the brand ultimately adopted and get Klaassen’s advice for bloggers looking to lure advertisers.

PART 1: Media Beat: Abbey Klaassen on the Future of Super Bowl Ads

PART 2: Media Beat: Abbey Klaassen Takes on Offensive Ads

Media Beat: Abbey Klaassen Takes on Offensive Ads

If you peruse AgencySpy on a given day, you’ll realize advertising has a favorite fall-back when it comes to eye-catching campaigns: T&A. So, what’s it like as a woman covering a somewhat sexist industry? For Advertising Age‘s executive editor Abbey Klaassen, it’s pretty simple: if advertisers are offensive, call ‘em out.

Watch the second installment of our Media Beat interview to hear how Klaassen transitioned from Ad Age‘s digital to executive editor and get her tips for freelance writers looking to score a byline in the trade pub.

PART 1: Media Beat: Abbey Klaassen on the Future of Super Bowl Ads

PART 3: On Wednesday, Klaassen gives tips to advertisers looking to fend off competition from Google.

Media Beat: Abbey Klaassen on the Future of Super Bowl Ads

Remember when the whole family crowded around the set for The Cosby Show or you got your roommates together for those Melrose Place viewing parties? Nowadays, you can probably count the number of television “events” on one hand. There is one program, however, that still gets a crazy number of eyeballs every year during its live broadcast: Super Bowl.

For the latest installment of Media Beat, we spoke with Advertising Age‘s executive editor Abbey Klaassen for her take on how advertisers can maximize their campaigns after the game and whether we’ll ever get DVR-proof commercials.

PART 2: Tomorrow, Klaassen discusses her new role as executive editor of Advertising Age and how you can land a byline in her pages.

PART 3: On Wednesday, Klaassen gives tips to advertisers looking to fend off competition from Google.