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Levi’s Shifts Biz to Draftfcb, The House Worldwide

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After spending a few years going forth with W+K, universally-known jeans brand Levi’s has moved its ad duties to Draftfcb and year-old agency The House Worldwide, which will share duties on global marketing, creative and strategic support. Levi’s CMO Jen Sey says in a statement, “We are very excited about this new model. We’re getting handpicked creative talent from Draftfcb and The House networks at both the global and local market level. This model will provide us with the efficiency and consistency we need as a global brand as well as the means to  drive relevance around the world by accessing top-notch local talent when we need it. In doing so, we’ll strive to reach passionate new fans in every market in which we operate.”

The 160-year-old brand previously worked with W+K since 2008 in the U.S. as well as BBH abroad. Among those participating in Levi’s new “customized” agency model are Draftfcb San Francisco, Draftfcb Los Angeles and The House Worldwide’s ChinaMadrid in Spain and CumminsRoss from Australia.

Draftfcb NY Launches Somewhat Alarming Anti-Smoking Campaign for FDA


Draftfcb is a launching a new youth anti-smoking campaign for the FDA, called “The Real Cost.”

The new campaign, the “first comprehensive tobacco education campaign using authority granted under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act,” aims to “prevent youth tobacco use and reduce the number of kids ages 12 to 17 who become regular smokers.” Based on the insight that almost 90 percent of established adult smokers began smoking by the age of 18, the multimedia campaign uses “compelling facts and vivid imagery” to attempt to change young people’s beliefs and behavior in regard to tobacco products. Among the approaches used in the campaign are a reframing of addiction as a loss of control and graphical dramatizations of the costs of smoking, such as tooth loss and skin damage. “The Real Cost” also uses social media to give teens a space to engage in conversations about the issue with their peers.

“Today marks a historic moment as we launch the FDA’s first-ever national education campaign to prevent tobacco use among our nation’s at-risk youth, and we bring to life the real costs that are of the most concern to these young people,” says FDA commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. The campaign, which launches Feb. 11, will be evaluated for its effectiveness over time. It includes “television, radio, print, online and out-of-home advertising,” with ads running in more than 200 markets throughout the U.S. “The Real Cost” is “the first of several campaigns that the FDA will launch over the next few years, with subsequent campaigns targeting multicultural, rural, and LGBT youth. You can view the gross “Your Teeth” above, and stick around for “Alison’s Bully” after the jump. Read more

Bryce Hudson Performs First Ever Chicken-Eating Backflip for KFC

Earlier this month, Draftfcb Chicago launched the “How Do You KFC?” integrated campaign for the colonel, “a new movement celebrating the connection KFC fans have with the food.” Part of that campaign was an online video of X Games Moto gold medalist Bryce Hudson, who became the first person to perform a backflip while eating chicken (a KFC Go Cup featuring Extra Crispy Tenders). Even more impressively, according to Draftfcb Chicago’s in-house production team, “when Hudson invited them to his private practice facility for the shoot, the successful flip was captured within the first two takes.” The ever-confident Hudson was not surprised. “I knew the backflip would be possible right off the bat,” he said, “I was so excited to join the #HowDoYouKFC movement with the world’s first chicken-eating backflip because I could enjoy two of my favorite things at the same time. It doesn’t get much better than that.” Draftfcb’s video crew for the shoot reportedly included only four people.

The video gained over half a million views during its first two weeks online, and, in a nod to fan appreciation, Draftfcb and KFC are turning it into a primetime television spot that begins airing tonight. “We want to stay nimble, listen to our fans, and give them what they want. When we saw that the Bryce Hudson video was quickly emerging as a fan favorite, we wanted to make it even bigger — and put it on TV,” said Jason Marker, General Manager for KFC U.S.

The “How Do You KFC” campaign also includes “revamps for point-of-purchase displays, uniforms, packaging, in-store greetings, digital and social assets,” as well as a streetball online video entitled “The Professor.” “How Do You KFC?” invites fans to participate by uploading photo or video content to social media with hashtag #HowDoYouKFC. KFC claims they will “will continually evaluate options for fan-driven videos throughout the campaign” so look for fan input to have a large impact throughout the campaign. The next video to make it to primetime could even be a fan-generated upload. Stick around for “The Professor” after the jump. Read more

Draftcb Releases Holiday ‘Ship My Pants’ Sequel for Kmart

If you were a fan of Draftcb’s almost-expletive filled “Ship My Pants” spot for Kmart, (which we covered back in April) you might be glad to learn that the agency has just released a holiday follow-up, “Ship My Trousers,” which hopes to recapture the viral success (over 20 million views) of that spot.  Draftcb’s sequel follows the formula of the original very, very closely. In fact, “Ship My Trousers” uses the same actors, and most of the same lines, as the original “Ship My Pants” spot. It’s pretty much the same ad, just adapted for characters from Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. If you enjoyed the original “Ship My Pants,” chances are you’ll find the sequel amusing as well. If you didn’t, you probably won’t want to bother watching “Ship My Trousers” above. Personally, while I don’t understand what characters from A Christmas Carol are doing shopping at Kmart, the “I just shipped my bed” guy’s delivery just about makes up for it. Idea for next time: hire the actor who played Clay Davis on The Wire to say “sheeeip.” Credits after the jump. Read more

Draftcb’s Joe Boxer Spot for Kmart Stirs Controversy Amongst the Easily Offended

You may have read about the controversy surrounding Draftcb Chicago’s new Joe Boxer spot for Kmart, “Show Your Joe.” If you actually watch the spot (featured above) and have any sense, you may wonder what all the fuss is about. Kmart, of course, is no stranger to controversial advertising: a recent Kmart spot featured Satan and Genghis Khan, and their “Ship My Pants” spot is still our favorite of the bunch.

“Show Your Joe” opens with a group of tuxedo-wearing men behind a curtain, ringing bells. After a few seconds the curtain is whisked away to reveal the men clad in only boxer shorts from the waist down, and they begin playing “Jingle Bells” by shaking their hips. Presumably the, uh, bells, are tucked away somewhere in those boxers. The men perform the chorus of the song…and that’s it. To be clear: there’s nothing all that risque about the execution — the camera is panned way out and these dudes are in boxers, okay? No junk visible. Repeat: no junk visible.

The holiday effort is a little juvenile perhaps, but offensive? Hardly. The most offensive thing about it may be that it’s not all that funny. Either the cries to arms are coming from those who feel this ad violates the “sanctity of Christmas” (you can see these people riding around in cars with “Put the Christ back in Christmas” bumper stickers and complaining about government handouts), or they are the typically hypocritical complaints that arise from anything remotely provocative associated with male body parts. Overtly sexualizing women in every single women’s underwear ad ever? That’s okay. Suggesting that a group of guys are playing “Jingle Bells” with parts tucked away in their boxers, away from view? Congratulations, you’ve just awakened the seven horses of the apocalypse.

Kmart has reportedly refused to pull the ad, despite a long list of complaints on their Facebook page (although a quick glance at the page while writing this turned up at least as many comments supporting the ad). Good for them. If anything, the controversy will just call more attention to the spot, Kmart and Joe Boxer. Let us know what you think about the so-called controversy surrounding “Show Your Joe” in the comments section. Credits after the jump. Read more

Draftcb Taps Satan, Genghis Khan for Kmart

Draftcb, the agency behind the “Ship My Pants” spot, continue their trend of employing off-the-wall humor in their campaign for Kmart.

In their latest spot, “Boardroom,” a boss asks a room full of evil workers — including Genghis Khan and Satan — for evil ideas to make layaway “as inconvenient as possible.” Genghis Khan suggests blackout dates, Satan offers up limitations like no clothes, and “Guy Who Always Takes the Last Donut” comes up with in-store only. The meeting is interrupted when a nun walks in, to which the boss running the meeting calmly replies “I believe we have the room until 11:30, sister.” I’m not quite sure why the nun is so unfazed upon seeing Satan in the flesh. You’d think she’d attempt to throw some holy water at him or something, at least. The spot ends by informing viewers of Kmarts “Shop Your Way” layaway policy — basically the opposite of all the evil ideas thrown out at the board meeting.

“Boardroom” is worth a quick chuckle, even if it’s not quite as funny as the “Ship My Pants” spot, and should gain Kmart some visibility. And we all know Kmart needs all the help it can get. Maybe that nun can pray for them, too.

Garfinkel Joins Up with Draftfcb NY as CEO

leegarfinkelWe’ve been told Carter Murray is announcing this news to staff as we speak. Yes, Lee Garfinkel, who’s spent nearly the last three years at what is now Havas, where he last served as chairman/CCO of global brands, has taken the top seat at Draftfcb New York. As CEO of DFCB NY, Garfinkel will not only run the fort but work in tandem with NY CCO,  Javier Campopiano. Regarding the hire, his new boss Murray says, “Some of the best agency leaders have come from creative backgrounds and I believe that Lee, with his strong creative reputation, is absolutely the right CEO for our New York office at this time. With our world-class chief creative officer Javi Campopiano already in place and Lee as CEO, we have high ambitions for the future of the office. Lee will help ensure that we create strong and memorable campaigns in the years ahead for our clients.”

During his 30-plus years in the ad biz, Garfinkel also served as EVP/ECD at BBDO, chairman at Lowe and chairman/CCO at DDB. While Garfinkel joins DFCB, Debra Coughlin, who’s served as EVP/global CMO for the past two-and-a-half years, is moving out of the leadership role in NY (though sources tell us she’ll be working with Carter Murray somewhat on new biz efforts). Regarding Coughlin, Murray adds,  “Debra, one of the smartest marketers I know and a consummate professional, has been truly understanding of my strategic desire to focus more aggressively on the creative product. So, while she transitions out of the New York role, she will be making sure things go as smoothly as possible until Lee joins forces with Javi and the rest of the New York team in January.”

 

Draftfcb LA Continues Full-Court Press for Nabi

Just two weeks ago, we were covering the first wave of Nabi spots from Draftfcb, a pair of 30-second ads that favorably compared kid-friendly Nabi tablets to Kindle devices a la Microsoft vs. Apple. Our Erik Oster found them to be informational and appealing. However, these two new spots, “Fear Not Question” and “Swagger,” drop the comparison technique for an unconvincing plea for Nabi to be a lifestyle brand.

“Fear No Question” presents the Nabi brand as classroom-friendly, going right after a parent’s sense of idealistic learning, so in turn, that parent will go right for his/her wallet. It’s a boring and safe play that may have worked out if Draftfcb hadn’t already launched the Kindle attacks that are much more memorable.

“Swagger” goes straight after the kids. Promoting Nabi headphones – think Beats for kids – the spot shows a little kid walking down a school hallway in slow-motion as he gives headnods to his friends and long stares to the girl he probably has a crush on. This is more Fubu than Fuhu. This is also just a bad commercial, corny and overdone, even for a children’s market. The tagline of “Everyone Needs a Theme Song” actually has a nice ring to it, but the visual execution is too silly. The clip almost plays like a mocking comedy skit of itself.

At 30 seconds, both ads are easy to watch and easy to forget. ”Swagger” and credits after the jump.

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Draftfcb Gives Oreos a ‘Dublin Twist’

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Following on the heels of the massively successful centennial “Daily Twist” campaign, Draftcb has teamed up with media agency PHD,  which won JC Decaux’s “Fame – The Agency Edition” competition and secured €150,000 of media space, for an outdoor campaign dubbed “Dublin Twist.”

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“Dublin Twist” celebrates unique landmarks and events around Dublin, by depicting them in the medium of Oreo. The fifteen “twists” include Oreo depictions of the maze at Iveagh Gardens, the Bram Stoker festival, the Hugh Lane Gallery, the Abbey Theatre, the Dublin Writers Museum, and others. Draftfcb London’s ECD David Harris describes the aim of the campaign: “Through the iconic images of OREOs, this campaign invites people to get together and discover the less well known, more unconventional parts of Dublin,” he said. The sixteenth and final “twist” on Dublin institutions will be based on a winning suggestion from one of of TheJournal.ie’s readers.

In addition to the aforementioned installations, the campaign will also transform Dublin public transportation. In addition to public bus wraps, a wrapped train called the Oreo Express will dispense Oreo samples at Dublin’s Pearse Station. That is going to make some kids very, very happy. On October 28th, the brand will support runners of the Dublin Marathon with a good luck message and goody bag contribution. The campaign runs through November 4th and also includes print, experiential and social media aspects.

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The “Dublin Twist” campaign is a fun and playful extension of the idea from a successful (also fun and playful) campaign. It’s really a can’t miss. What’s not to like about minimalist interpretations of a city’s lesser-known landmarks and events, depicted using only Oreo cookies? Let’s hope Oreo continues this “twist” trend further, as it has worked excellently for the brand and offers a seemingly endless array of possible variations. Credits and more images after the jump Read more

Draftfcb LA Pushes Nabi in First Campaign as AOR for Fuhu

Draftcb has unveiled two new spots for the Nabi, its first campaign for Fuhu since becoming their agency of record in September.

Fuhu has done incredibly well for themselves with the Nabi, a soft-edged tablet designed for children, even being named “the fastest growing company in America” by Inc. There’s certainly no change in strategy from Draftcb for these two new spots. “Good Morning” and “Glow in the Dark” tout the Nabi’s kid-friendly features via comparison with the Kindle, which comes out looking sorely lacking in the kid-friendly department.

If you are going to buy your kids a tablet, I suppose it should be one that’s made for them, right? These spots do a good job extolling the Nabi as the perfect option for children. In “Good Morning” (featured above) that means talking about the Nabi’s “time controls” — in this case, a good morning song to wake up to. The Nabi does its thing before asking a silent Kindle what its good morning song is.

“Glow in the Dark,” meanwhile, highlights Nabi’s glow in the dark feature. No surprise there. Also not a surprise: the Kindle does not glow in the dark. Score: Nabi 2, Kindle 0. Plus, the Nabi just looks like something a kid would want to play with. So make that Nabi 3, Kindle 0.

We see plenty of these “direct comparison to our biggest competitor” ads with tech gadgets, but few seem to take the wind out of the competition the way these ads sucker punch the Kindle. At least for the Nabi’s target audience. If I were shopping around for a tablet for a child, this campaign would have me convinced that the Nabi is the way to go. Thankfully, I won’t find myself in that situation any time soon. Credits and “Glow in the Dark” after the jump.  Read more

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