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Ogilvy

Falusi, Paterson Move Up the Ranks at Ogilvy NY

corinnafalusi1-140SOgilvy’s NY HQ has given the bump-up to two of its senior creatives as the agency has promoted group creative director Corinna Falusi, who works on IKEA and Coke, to ECD, and creative director Michael Paterson, who works on American Express, to senior partner/GCD. Falusi, you may recall, joined O&M nearly two years ago from StrawberryFrog, where she spent nearly a decade and last served as ECD. Paterson, meanwhile, has been with Ogilvy’s New York office for five years, during which time he’s also worked on the “A Smarter Planet” campaign for IBM as well as efforts for Gap.

From what we’ve been told, the pair isn’t replacing anyone in their respective positions, but are just being promoted “due to their great work and the need for creatives at a higher level.”

Tiffany’s Appoints Ogilvy as Global Agency Partner

After a four-month search, New York-based luxury jewelry retailer Tiffany & Co., which had previously handled marketing internally, has found a global agency partner in Ogilvy & Mather, whose NYC and Paris offices will serve as the creative and strategic hubs for the brand. In a statement regarding Tiffany & Co’s decision, the retailer’s SVP/CMO Caroline Naggiar says, “We were impressed by Ogilvy’s experience in luxury, creative approach to solving consumer challenges in a new era of brand building and proven ability to implement integrated campaigns across the globe. We believe they will be instrumental in further enhancing our global business.”

Sources familiar with the matter, meanwhile, tell us that Ogilvy, which will handle print, digital, video and out-of-home for Tiffany’s in tandem with the latter’s in-house marketing team, beat out BBDO and TBWA\Paris in the retailer’s review that was managed by Ark Advisors. From what we hear, other agencies in the mix were Grey, Sid Lee and M&C Saatchi.

BBH Producer Mercadal Heads to Ogilvy

rubenmercadalAfter spending the last seven years at BBH London, where he last served as executive producer/partner, Ruben Mercadal has headed to the States to join up with Ogilvy New York in the newly created position of senior film content producer. During his long stay at BBH’s London hub, Mercadal racked up One Show, Clios, D&AD and Cannes Lions for his work on Johnnie Walker’s 2009 campaign, “The Man Who Walked Around the World.” In addition to the whiskey brand, Mercadal served as agency producer for a host of other clients including Axe (remember this from last year?), Audi, Dunlop, Mentos and Barclays.

Prior to BBH, Mercadal worked as a broadcast producer at the London offices of both Publicis and Saatchi & Saatchi. He officially assumed his new role at Ogilvy on Tuesday.

Ogilvy Channels Paris ECD to Head Up East Coast Ops

chrisogilvySources familiar with the matter tell us that Chris Garbutt, who has been with Ogilvy & Mather for the past seven years, has joined up with the WPP-owned agency’s East Coast operations, has joined up to head up its East Coast U.S. operations. Prior to this time at O&M, Garbutt worked for several years at TBWA\Paris and South African-based TBWA\Hunt Lascaris. We’ll await for a statement soon from Ogilvy on the matter. From what we’ve been told, Garbutt will be moving to the agency by year’s end. Here’s a comment from those in the know:

“The multi- award-winning creative director of Ogilvy Paris would he desires elsewhere? If the rumor begins to swell in advertising world, it is because it is founded. According to our information , a transfer of the “chief creative officer” to Ogilvy New York is under consideration. It could be done ‘ by the end of the year ,’ said a spokesman for the agency , insisting on the “quite natural” character of this movement, in an international group where “offices in New York Paris and work closely in the management of brands”.

In fact , functions and especially the title of Chris Garbutt in the New York cousin had not yet been determined, as well as the conditions for eventual succession in the Paris office. If this departure became effective – he is still there to manage teams, Ogilvy would have to work hard to find the equivalent of South African hunter Lions (18 in 2013, including a Grand Prix Outdoor) , like a fish in the water with the digital , which led twice Ogilvy France on top of Eurobest . It is for this young successor of Bernard Bureau that the function of “chief creative officer” for all of Ogilvy France had been specially created in mid-2012 . He knows O & M long : it started at Ogilvy and Mather MTSR , South Africa in 1995 , before joining France and especially TBWA \ G1 on Nissan budget. Then return Ogilvy in 2008 as Creative Director of Ogilvy Paris. .

Laurentino to Assume Global ECD Role on Unilever at O&M

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After spending the last three years at TBWA\London, where he currently serves as executive creative director and global CD for McDonald’s, Andre Laurentino is heading to Ogilvy to assume the global ECD post on Unilever, effective February 2014. The Brazilian native will remain based in London when he joins O&M, whose U.K. office serves as the global hub for Unilever brands including Dove and Hellman’s. Laurentino (pictured alongside his new boss, O&M worldwide CCO Tham Khai Meng) succeeds Gerry Human, who has now been bumped up to CCO at Ogilvy London.  During his career, the new Ogilvy global ECD worked for several years at the likes of AlmapBBDO and Lew’Lara\TBWA, picking up Cannes Lions, D&AD and One Show Pencils along the way.

O&M Japan Illustrates Kids’ Dreams for Konica Minolta

Here’s a cheery Monday item: Ogilvy&Mather Japan’s created a “Dream Printer” project for Konica Minolta, asking children what they dreamed of being when they grew up and then showing them what it would look like if their dreams came true.

Playing off the brand’s core concept of “Giving Shape to Ideas,” Ogilvy&Mather set up shop in Gantry Plaza State Park in New York, placing their “Dream Printer” in the middle of the park. The printer asked curious children what to write down their dream. Within minutes, the “Dream Printer” dispensed an illustration of the child fulfilling his or her dream, much to their delight. Ogilvy&Mather and Konica Minolta spread a lot of smiles during the process, and you can check out the project in the video above. At the end of the video, as night falls, the printer’s true identity is revealed.

“We wanted to encourage children by showing them that the more you imagine, the more your dreams take shape,” explained Yuki Kobayashi, general manager of Konica Minolta’s CSR, Corporate Communications & Branding Division. “Dream Printer” is a cute little project, part of a larger campaign employing the ”Giving Shape to Ideas” concept in different ways. Whether or not it helped spread brand awareness, “Dream Printer” made a bunch of kids happy, which we think is a great accomplishment in itself. If you can spare the 3:26 to watch “Dream Printer,” it just might be the positive start to the week that you need. Credits after the jump.  Read more

What Exactly is Ogilvy’s ‘Project Sunlight’ for Unilever?

Unilever, the international conglomerate producing over 400 products, hasn’t always had a sterling environmental and social record. In 2007, Greenpeace targeted the corporation for the deforestation of Indonesian rainforests linked to its sources of palm oil. The UN Environmental Programme called palm oil plantations the leading cause of deforestation in Indonesia. Then, in 2011, Unilver partnered with Proctor and Gamble in a European washing powder price-fixing scheme. About the best thing you could say about Unilever was “at least they’re not Nestlé.”

But in recent years Unilever has been doing a lot to change public perception and at least appear to work toward sustainability. They were a founding member of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil and in 2012 announced that its sustainable palm oil target would be reached three years ahead of schedule, as well as promising “100% palm oil from certified traceable sources by 2020.” But a report issued last week by the International Labor Rights Forum and Sawit Watch found ”flagrant disregard for human rights at some of the very plantations the RSPO certifies as ‘sustainable.’” These human rights violations included “labor trafficking, child labor, unprotected work with hazardous chemicals, and long-term abuse of temporary contracts.”

So here we are a week later, on Universal Children’s Day, and Unilver has a new campaign called “Project Sunlight,” which it describes in a press release as appealing to everyone, but particularly parents, “encouraging them to join what Unilever sees as a growing community of people who want to make the world a better place for children and future generations” and “a new initiative to motivate millions of people to adopt more sustainable lifestyles.”

At the center of Ogilvy London’s campaign is the video, directed by Academy Award-winning director Errol Morrisand scored with the worst Pixies cover you’ve ever heard, ”Why Bring A Child Into This World?.” which answers that question by stating that our grandchildren will live in a better place than we do. It’s a slick, well-produced 4:26 clip charged with sentimentality and promise, especially if you’re a new or expectant parent.

Read more

Memac O&M Extends UN Women Campaign with ‘The Autocomplete Truth’

The latest in Dubai-based Memac Ogilvy & Mather’s campaign for United Nations Women is the affecting 1:30 video, “The Autocomplete Truth.” This short video comes on the heels of the virally successful print/online campaign launched this September that attempted to “start a conversation on the major barriers that are in place of women’s economic, political and social empowerment across the globe” — issues central to UN Women.

“The Autocomplete Truth” began, according to the Memac Ogilvy announce, when the team did a search for the term “women should” and were astounded by the sexist autocorrect results: “women should stay at home,” “women should be slaves,” “women should be in the kitchen,” “women should not speak in church.” The short video begins positively, with a montage of women’s rights achievements from women’s suffrage to Sarah Attar‘s appearance in the 2012 Summer Olympics. Then the video poses the question of where we are today, before answering with the troubling autocomplete results. It comes as a bit of a shock following the optimistic portrayal of women’s rights successes that precedes it, a perfect way to disrupt the impression that society has somehow advanced beyond sexism and illustrate the continued importance of women’s rights campaigns.

Although I don’t question the veracity of the team’s March 9, 2013 Google searches (location obviously has a significant impact on results), I wondered what my own Google search for “Women should” would bring up. The results were a bit more optimistic, with the top results: “women shoulder bags,” “women should be in combat,” “women shoulder exercises,” and “women should be allowed in combat.” I’ll take “shoulder bags” over “should be slaves” any day, of course. However, when I repeated the experiment with some of the other search terms from the print campaign, my results were pretty much in line with the those of the campaign. My “women shouldn’t” search had “go to business school” as the top result, go figure. Pretty depressing stuff, and ample evidence that discrimination against women is still a dominant force in 2013. Misogynistic commenters of AgencySpy, please stay the fuck out of this one.

Damn the Onions: Ogilvy Raises the Bar with New ‘Google Search: Reunion’ Spot

Wow. Google’s advertising has always been solid, irrespective of agency and market. But Ogilvy Mumbai’s new spot “Google Search: Reunion” for Google India has taken it to the next level. I’m a pretty sensitive guy, but this is probably the first spot I’ve ever seen that makes me so emotional that I actually have to hold back tears. It makes Pereira & O’Dell’s recent “Stay Together” spot for Skype seem tame in comparison. Not only is the spot emotionally affecting, it manages to address the India-Pakistan partition, “a moment that has left a deep imprint across many generations on both sides of the border.”

“Google Search: Reunion” begins with a man telling his granddaughter about his long-lost childhood friend Yousaf. The pair would fly kites together every day, and steal candy from the candy shop run by Yousaf’s family. The old man, Baldev, misses his friend, who he was separated from during the partition of India and Pakistan. It would appear hopeless that Baldev and Yousaf would ever see each other again.

But Baldev’s granddaughter, Suman, does the seemingly impossible. She uses Google to track down the sweet shop still run by Yousaf’s family, using clues from her grandfather’s stories of his childhood. Suman then arranges for Yousaf to reunite with her grandfather for his birthday. When the two see each other for the first time since their childhood, it’s so overpoweringly emotional that it’s almost too much to take. This is advertising as storytelling, and it puts to shame so many lesser attempts to do so. It’s sentimental (in a good way) without being melodramatic, and positions Google as the tool that makes the whole incredible episode possible.

According to Google India director of marketing Sandeep Menon, “India has well over 150 million Internet users, and most of them use Google in various formats, be it from desktops, or mobile devices. We wanted to strike up a conversation to showcase the different uses of Google, and at the same time, tell magical stories that show why ours users love the product. One of our core philosophies is that our users are smart and intelligent. Hence, the attempt was to have a conversation and tell users that they can do a lot more, and a lot quicker, by showcasing some of the innovations that allow the product to be used in different ways.”

The 3:32 video is tremendously popular, going viral on YouTube, where it’s already approaching two million views. We really can’t say enough good things about this spot. This is how you win at advertising. (Impending firebombing of comments section with bile hatred and jealousy to commence in an estimated five seconds.) Credits after the jump. Read more

Ogilvy’s ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ Video Series for British Airways Stokes Nostalgia


I grew up reading the classic Choose Your Own Adventure book series, so Ogilvy’s new Choose Your Own Adventure video series “Yourope” for British Airways has brought on a welcome rush of nostalgia.

The initial video positions you at a British Airways terminal with a choice of four destinations which you can choose to visit: Barcelona, Paris, Berlin, and Rome. The “choose your own adventure” aspect doesn’t end with choosing a destination, however. When you choose Barcelona, you’re given a choice between night and day; when you choose Rome you get to choose between “old” and “new”; in Berlin the choice is between “punk” and “posh”; and in Paris it’s “classic” and “curious.” A different video, each directed by Brandon LaGanke, will play based on which side of the destination you choose. Once it’s complete, you can choose to explore the other side of your destination or to travel somewhere new. For example, if you chose night Barcelona you could then check out daytime Barcelona.

It’s a fun idea, and the execution is well done. Not stopping at choosing a destination, but adding different aspects of the same city creates depth and really adds to the illusion that you’re choosing your own destiny. That each side of each city is given not only its own video, but a different feel — complete with a unique music selection — is the icing on the cake. I’m sure we’ll have haters in the comments section decrying this as a lame, digital gimmick, but I found it to be good fun. If this series left you hungry for more Choose Your Own Adventure style shenanigans, check out this kickass Freaks and Geeks interactive game. Credits after the jump. Read more

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