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Ogilvy

What Exactly is Ogilvy’s ‘Project Sunlight’ for Unilever?

Unilever, the international conglomerate producing over 400 products, hasn’t always had a sterling environmental and social record. In 2007, Greenpeace targeted the corporation for the deforestation of Indonesian rainforests linked to its sources of palm oil. The UN Environmental Programme called palm oil plantations the leading cause of deforestation in Indonesia. Then, in 2011, Unilver partnered with Proctor and Gamble in a European washing powder price-fixing scheme. About the best thing you could say about Unilever was “at least they’re not Nestlé.”

But in recent years Unilever has been doing a lot to change public perception and at least appear to work toward sustainability. They were a founding member of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil and in 2012 announced that its sustainable palm oil target would be reached three years ahead of schedule, as well as promising “100% palm oil from certified traceable sources by 2020.” But a report issued last week by the International Labor Rights Forum and Sawit Watch found ”flagrant disregard for human rights at some of the very plantations the RSPO certifies as ‘sustainable.’” These human rights violations included “labor trafficking, child labor, unprotected work with hazardous chemicals, and long-term abuse of temporary contracts.”

So here we are a week later, on Universal Children’s Day, and Unilver has a new campaign called “Project Sunlight,” which it describes in a press release as appealing to everyone, but particularly parents, “encouraging them to join what Unilever sees as a growing community of people who want to make the world a better place for children and future generations” and “a new initiative to motivate millions of people to adopt more sustainable lifestyles.”

At the center of Ogilvy London’s campaign is the video, directed by Academy Award-winning director Errol Morrisand scored with the worst Pixies cover you’ve ever heard, ”Why Bring A Child Into This World?.” which answers that question by stating that our grandchildren will live in a better place than we do. It’s a slick, well-produced 4:26 clip charged with sentimentality and promise, especially if you’re a new or expectant parent.

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Memac O&M Extends UN Women Campaign with ‘The Autocomplete Truth’

The latest in Dubai-based Memac Ogilvy & Mather’s campaign for United Nations Women is the affecting 1:30 video, “The Autocomplete Truth.” This short video comes on the heels of the virally successful print/online campaign launched this September that attempted to “start a conversation on the major barriers that are in place of women’s economic, political and social empowerment across the globe” — issues central to UN Women.

“The Autocomplete Truth” began, according to the Memac Ogilvy announce, when the team did a search for the term “women should” and were astounded by the sexist autocorrect results: “women should stay at home,” “women should be slaves,” “women should be in the kitchen,” “women should not speak in church.” The short video begins positively, with a montage of women’s rights achievements from women’s suffrage to Sarah Attar‘s appearance in the 2012 Summer Olympics. Then the video poses the question of where we are today, before answering with the troubling autocomplete results. It comes as a bit of a shock following the optimistic portrayal of women’s rights successes that precedes it, a perfect way to disrupt the impression that society has somehow advanced beyond sexism and illustrate the continued importance of women’s rights campaigns.

Although I don’t question the veracity of the team’s March 9, 2013 Google searches (location obviously has a significant impact on results), I wondered what my own Google search for “Women should” would bring up. The results were a bit more optimistic, with the top results: “women shoulder bags,” “women should be in combat,” “women shoulder exercises,” and “women should be allowed in combat.” I’ll take “shoulder bags” over “should be slaves” any day, of course. However, when I repeated the experiment with some of the other search terms from the print campaign, my results were pretty much in line with the those of the campaign. My “women shouldn’t” search had “go to business school” as the top result, go figure. Pretty depressing stuff, and ample evidence that discrimination against women is still a dominant force in 2013. Misogynistic commenters of AgencySpy, please stay the fuck out of this one.

Damn the Onions: Ogilvy Raises the Bar with New ‘Google Search: Reunion’ Spot

Wow. Google’s advertising has always been solid, irrespective of agency and market. But Ogilvy Mumbai’s new spot “Google Search: Reunion” for Google India has taken it to the next level. I’m a pretty sensitive guy, but this is probably the first spot I’ve ever seen that makes me so emotional that I actually have to hold back tears. It makes Pereira & O’Dell’s recent “Stay Together” spot for Skype seem tame in comparison. Not only is the spot emotionally affecting, it manages to address the India-Pakistan partition, “a moment that has left a deep imprint across many generations on both sides of the border.”

“Google Search: Reunion” begins with a man telling his granddaughter about his long-lost childhood friend Yousaf. The pair would fly kites together every day, and steal candy from the candy shop run by Yousaf’s family. The old man, Baldev, misses his friend, who he was separated from during the partition of India and Pakistan. It would appear hopeless that Baldev and Yousaf would ever see each other again.

But Baldev’s granddaughter, Suman, does the seemingly impossible. She uses Google to track down the sweet shop still run by Yousaf’s family, using clues from her grandfather’s stories of his childhood. Suman then arranges for Yousaf to reunite with her grandfather for his birthday. When the two see each other for the first time since their childhood, it’s so overpoweringly emotional that it’s almost too much to take. This is advertising as storytelling, and it puts to shame so many lesser attempts to do so. It’s sentimental (in a good way) without being melodramatic, and positions Google as the tool that makes the whole incredible episode possible.

According to Google India director of marketing Sandeep Menon, “India has well over 150 million Internet users, and most of them use Google in various formats, be it from desktops, or mobile devices. We wanted to strike up a conversation to showcase the different uses of Google, and at the same time, tell magical stories that show why ours users love the product. One of our core philosophies is that our users are smart and intelligent. Hence, the attempt was to have a conversation and tell users that they can do a lot more, and a lot quicker, by showcasing some of the innovations that allow the product to be used in different ways.”

The 3:32 video is tremendously popular, going viral on YouTube, where it’s already approaching two million views. We really can’t say enough good things about this spot. This is how you win at advertising. (Impending firebombing of comments section with bile hatred and jealousy to commence in an estimated five seconds.) Credits after the jump. Read more

Ogilvy’s ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ Video Series for British Airways Stokes Nostalgia


I grew up reading the classic Choose Your Own Adventure book series, so Ogilvy’s new Choose Your Own Adventure video series “Yourope” for British Airways has brought on a welcome rush of nostalgia.

The initial video positions you at a British Airways terminal with a choice of four destinations which you can choose to visit: Barcelona, Paris, Berlin, and Rome. The “choose your own adventure” aspect doesn’t end with choosing a destination, however. When you choose Barcelona, you’re given a choice between night and day; when you choose Rome you get to choose between “old” and “new”; in Berlin the choice is between “punk” and “posh”; and in Paris it’s “classic” and “curious.” A different video, each directed by Brandon LaGanke, will play based on which side of the destination you choose. Once it’s complete, you can choose to explore the other side of your destination or to travel somewhere new. For example, if you chose night Barcelona you could then check out daytime Barcelona.

It’s a fun idea, and the execution is well done. Not stopping at choosing a destination, but adding different aspects of the same city creates depth and really adds to the illusion that you’re choosing your own destiny. That each side of each city is given not only its own video, but a different feel — complete with a unique music selection — is the icing on the cake. I’m sure we’ll have haters in the comments section decrying this as a lame, digital gimmick, but I found it to be good fun. If this series left you hungry for more Choose Your Own Adventure style shenanigans, check out this kickass Freaks and Geeks interactive game. Credits after the jump. Read more

Ogilvy’s New ‘Separation’ Spot for KFC is Kind of Depressing

This is not what I needed on a Monday.

Ogilvy Johannesburg’s new spot for KFC, “Separation,” opens with a father picking up his son for a day. “Guess I’ll have him back by six,” he tells the mother. He asks his son what the plan for the day is, and the son says he doesn’t know. The two spend some time at the beach, until it starts to rain, and try to catch up. “You hungry?” the boy asks, and they drive to KFC, where the boy orders the “family treat” which elicits a questioning look from the father. When they drive back to the house, the boy asks again, “You hungry?” as the father accompanies him inside. The hashtag #familytime closes the spot.

While I appreciate Ogilvy and KFC highlighting a non-traditional family in their advertising, this one is just depressing. The poor kid uses a KFC meal to get his parents to eat a meal together? Aww man, that’s just so sad. Too sad for an advertisement, maybe? Perhaps? I don’t know, because it’s certainly a memorable spot. I’m going to remember this one for a while. But the next time I drive by my neighborhood KFC I’ll be tearing up, not thinking about how much I want fried chicken. Credits after the jump. Read more

And Now, Here’s the Memo Regarding the Addition to Ogilvy’s Aetna Biz

 

aetna

This memo, courtesy of OgilvyOne New York president Dimitri Maex announces the arrival of a bit more Aetna biz for the agency.

 

“ALL NEW YORK STAFF
AETNA

Last year Aetna appointed us as AOR for all their B2B communications. They have now decided to give us the consumer brand business. This is a terrific win and we owe it mainly to the Aetna team who has been working tirelessly to, first, onboard a very complex business and then, quickly turn it into a well oiled machine. A couple of weeks ago they launched Aetna’s first corporate campaign, “Our Healthy,” which was written up in the New York Times. The team’s work was the main reason Aetna awarded us the consumer brand work. A huge congratulations to Rebecca Barnard, Ben Levine, David Korchin, Stephanie Wai and the rest of the team for making this happen.

With the Affordable Care Act now in effect and the growing importance of public and private health exchanges, the health insurance industry is rapidly transforming from a pure B2B business to one that is primarily consumer driven. Consumer brand advertising, therefore, has become crucially important for Aetna and we couldn’t be more excited to be their main agency partner in this transformation. “

Gordon & Taylor Get CDW to Build Technologically Advanced Stadium, Forget to Hire Team

Ogilvy Chicago’s latest spot in their “People Who Get It” campaign for CDW features Charles Barkley, Doug Flutie, and a technologically advanced stadium without a team.

In the spot, Jim Gordon takes you on a tour of Gordon and Taylor stadium, a domed football stadium he touts as “the most technologically advanced stadium in the world,” thanks to CDW. Features include “3,000 screens, stadium-wide wi-fi, seamless POS systems and a cloud infrastructure solution.” The funniest moment of the spot comes right after this list of features. “Do I know what those are? Not exactly,” Gordon admits. “But they sound impressive.” This should hit home with a lot of people who fall a good deal short of IT expert, myself included.

Over the course of the spot it’s revealed that Gordon has the perfect stadium, a half-time show, cheerleaders, a mascot, Charles Barkley and Doug Flutie on board — basically everything he needs, except a team. He seems to get more and more panicked about this as the spot goes on. Looks like Flutie may have to QB himself. The spot is fun and lighthearted, although I wish Barkley had more lines as he has a good comic presence. I wouldn’t be too surprised to see a follow-up spot

Time Warner Cable Goes ‘Crazy’

Ogilvy and Mather NY’s latest spot for Time Warner Cable Sportscast, “Crazy,” directed by David Gray, asks if it’s crazy to love football so much that you do things that might be a little…unusual.

The simple :33 spot highlights a series of super-fan behaviors as a humorous way to advertise how missing a game is what would really make you crazy. The spot may have been more effective if they had went a little further out there with the “crazy” fan behaviors though, as most of them are pretty tame. The touchdown dance one, in particular, could have been replaced with something a little “crazier.” A lot of people don’t know how to dance.

Wearing the same outfit every game day? Setting up your daughter’s Brownie troop in shotgun formation? Growing a lucky beard?

No, Time Warner, that’s not crazy. But accidentally broadcasting porn on a children’s channel is. Credits after the jump. Read more

Ogilvy Cuts More Staff in Chicago

For the second time in as many months, Ogilvy Chicago has had to make some reductions. Here’s the statement from the agency: “Today Ogilvy Chicago reduced our staff by 1-2%. While we regret having to say goodbye to even one employee, this move is part of a plan to restructure the agency and serve our clients more efficiently.” From what we’re hearing from tipsters, anywhere from 10-20 staffers were affected by today’s move. Like last time, though, details including departments affected and reason for the matter have not been clarified, but we’ll surely let you know if and when we hear more.

Here’s the Ogilvy Memo Regarding E*Trade Win

By now, word is out and widespread that Ogilvy has taken the reins on the E*Trade account, which WPP sibling Grey NY of course resigned at the end of June. Whether they keep the baby or not is a story yet to be told, but according to the Spy line, O&M was one of the frontrunners on the business from the get-go. Anyhow, we’ve read recently installed E*Trade CMO Liza Landsman‘s perspective. Now, let’s pass the mic and read Ogilvy’s courtesy of New York COO Lou Aversano. Read on below and after the jump.

“ALL NA STAFF

July 23, 2013

E*TRADE

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