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Posts Tagged ‘Andre Pienaar’

DDB Canada’s Netflix ‘Pep Talk’ Falls Flat

While Netflix is absolutely everywhere in the US, the streaming service has had some trouble catching on in Canada, where “research showed that Canadians struggled to see the value in the service.” So how do you get Canadians to like something? Hockey, definitely hockey.

So, DDB Canada Vancouver whipped up (and it does feel whipped up) a locker room spot for the new Canadian brand campaign entitled “Pep Talk,” in which a coach tells his players to “remember that scene from that movie on Netflix” where “the coach…gave that speech…well that, gentleman, is what I am saying!” rather than provide a speech of his own. The whole thing is reminiscent of a Simpsons joke from the 1992 episode “Homer at the Bat” in which Mr. Burns tells his softball team, “So I want you to remember some inspiring words that someone else might have told you over the course of your lives, and go out there and win!” But, you know, a lot less funny.

The idea was to show “how stories you can find on Netflix stay with you anywhere, anytime.” It would have helped to create an ad that stuck with you, instead of one this forgettable. Credits after the jump. Read more

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Your Child Will Probably Die Because the BC Children’s Hospital Ceiling is Too Low

When I first watched this spot from DARE Vancouver, I thought, “Wait, if the BC Children’s Hospital is so full, then why do they need donations to help fund a new building? Shouldn’t they be rich?” Then, I realized “Oh yeah, healthcare is free in Canada. Well, this is what happens when you stick it to capitalism.”

Then, it all started making sense. Why did riots erupt so quickly in Vancouver after the Canucks lost the Stanley Cup? Because locals knew they could get terribly injured as the streets of British Columbia burned without any sort of monetary penalty for going to the hospital. I mean, if you’re the kind of person who isn’t quite a riot fanatic, but fancies the possibility of widespread looting and destruction every once in a while, doesn’t Vancouver sound like a great place to settle down?

It’s as though the hockey riots and Olympic riots were basically a billboard to the world advertising Vancouver, a nice place where you can cut loose once in a while. Next thing you know, you have population overflow, the hospitals get filled to the brim with injured kids out staging little riots about candy or stickers or whatever, and now the BC Children’s Hospital is forced to make the above spot. It’s as though Canada’s SOCIALISM is doubly screwing its hospitals. You guys, is this the kind of country you want your children to grow up in? Where hospitals’ ceilings are like four feet tall and kids DIE?

However, if you’re feeling charitable, you can give to the campaign for the BC Children’s Hospital here. One more spot, “Hospital Ward,” and credits follow after the jump.

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Leo Toronto Has Us Pegged

Check out this opening created by Leo Burnett, Toronto for the 2010 Advertising and Design Club of Canada (ADCC) Awards, which took place on Nov. 4. I love it in that that it “taps into an insight every creative feels – love for the business when things are going well, and hate, when things aren’t.” I love how it doesn’t mince words and actually uses the words “hate” and “love”. I love how we all really do have that moment when you’re sitting across from an asshole and you go from hate to love in one minute. Leo Burnett, you definitely get high fives for this one. If it so interests you, check out a full list of ADCC winners here.

Credits after the jump Read more