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Posts Tagged ‘Beth Fitzpatrick’

W+K NY Celebrates the World Cup’s ‘One Time Zone’ for ESPN

Yesterday we brought you news of Adidas’ World Cup spot from TBWA featuring Lionel Messi, a host of other international stars, and a Kanye West track. Now here’s a look at the latest in W+K New York’s World Cup campaign for ESPN.

The charming 60-second spot, entitled “Time Zone,” examines how the World Cup creates “one time zone,” as the whole world rearranges their schedule to watch the World Cup premiere. “Time Zone” opens and ends in Brazil, stopping over in destinations around the world as everyone prepares for the match. Some have an easier time adjusting to “Brazil time” than others. A businessman in Seattle is seen rushing out of the office while updating his voicemail to reflect that he will be “out of the office for the rest of the afternoon” — an accurate portrayal of kickoff times in the states — while an old woman falls asleep watching the game in Russia and in Japan a group congregates before the sun rises. The spot ends with the tagline, “Every 4 years the world has one time zone,” which is reminiscent of the earlier “Every 4 years the conversation starts again.” This newer spot reflects the heightened anticipation for the World Cup kickoff, which is just over two weeks away. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

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W+K NY Sparks World Cup Convo for ESPN

Wieden + Kennedy New York’s latest World Cup spot is a welcome departure from their previous World Cup work, foregoing focusing directly on the on-field action in lieu of the conversations and connections among fans sparked by the World Cup, leading into the “Every Four Years” tagline.

The new 30-second spot, called “Global Issues,” follows a linear conversation between soccer fans from diverse backgrounds. “Global Issues” stars real soccer enthusiasts — including a German butcher, an Italian barber, and a cab driver from the Ivory Coast, who support a vast array of teams, but all reside in the U.S. It’s a clever direction, executed well thanks largely to the precision editing, from editorial company Final Cut, necessary to pull off such an approach, and illustrates the excitement leading up to the World Cup well.

Wieden + Kennedy New York also debuted eight of its 32 original World Cup posters for ESPN, designed by Brazilian artist and graphic designer Cristiano Siqueira. Each features a likeness of key players and stories from the featured country competing in the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Stick around after the jump for a look at several of these posters, as well as campaign credits. Read more

Berlin Cameron Steals Dress for Gilt

Berlin Cameron United’s new campaign for Gilt features a chase scene and some unusual disrobing.

Upon sighting a model in a sleek yellow dress, a woman decides she can’t live without the outfit and chases after her. The model frantically runs away, because that’s what you do when you’re pursued by a woman with a crazy look in her eye. Appropriately set to the song “Suit” by Boom! Bap! Pow!, which features lyrics like “You’re so cute, I want to wear you like a suit. I think you’d look pretty good on me,” the chase concludes with the woman accessing Gilt’s site on her smartphone. This causes the dress to seamlessly slide off the model and on to the chaser, leaving the model in her underwear. While a tad on the ridiculous side, the spot shows off the instant gratification of shopping on the designer fashion site in a fun way. The 30-second ad, which went up on YouTube today, will spread to television on Monday, reports Adweek. Credits after the jump. Read more

What Exactly is Ogilvy’s ‘Project Sunlight’ for Unilever?

Unilever, the international conglomerate producing over 400 products, hasn’t always had a sterling environmental and social record. In 2007, Greenpeace targeted the corporation for the deforestation of Indonesian rainforests linked to its sources of palm oil. The UN Environmental Programme called palm oil plantations the leading cause of deforestation in Indonesia. Then, in 2011, Unilver partnered with Proctor and Gamble in a European washing powder price-fixing scheme. About the best thing you could say about Unilever was “at least they’re not Nestlé.”

But in recent years Unilever has been doing a lot to change public perception and at least appear to work toward sustainability. They were a founding member of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil and in 2012 announced that its sustainable palm oil target would be reached three years ahead of schedule, as well as promising “100% palm oil from certified traceable sources by 2020.” But a report issued last week by the International Labor Rights Forum and Sawit Watch found ”flagrant disregard for human rights at some of the very plantations the RSPO certifies as ‘sustainable.’” These human rights violations included “labor trafficking, child labor, unprotected work with hazardous chemicals, and long-term abuse of temporary contracts.”

So here we are a week later, on Universal Children’s Day, and Unilver has a new campaign called “Project Sunlight,” which it describes in a press release as appealing to everyone, but particularly parents, “encouraging them to join what Unilever sees as a growing community of people who want to make the world a better place for children and future generations” and “a new initiative to motivate millions of people to adopt more sustainable lifestyles.”

At the center of Ogilvy London’s campaign is the video, directed by Academy Award-winning director Errol Morrisand scored with the worst Pixies cover you’ve ever heard, ”Why Bring A Child Into This World?.” which answers that question by stating that our grandchildren will live in a better place than we do. It’s a slick, well-produced 4:26 clip charged with sentimentality and promise, especially if you’re a new or expectant parent.

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Steak ‘n Shake Deals May Bring Out Your Gluttonous Side

Call it a restaurant, diner or whatever you will, but as we’ve said before, Steak ‘n Shake was a late-night blessing during those hazy days of college. Though it’s been 10 years or so since our last visit to one of their locations (plus, we can’t even find one close by anymore), we’re not sure if these new ads from KBS+P have us ready to wax nostalgic just yet. Still, it’s hard to complain, if you’re starvin like marvin, about $3.99 all-you-can-eat pancakes as promoted in the ad called “Tear” above.

Besides, there’s only so far you can go when promoting a restaurant chain’s deals and we think these executions are somewhat of an improvement over what Zimmerman put forth during their time with Steak ‘n Shake. KBS+P, if you recall, took over the account in March. See two more deal-promoting spots and credits after the jump.

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Heineken Indicates When Handlebar Moustaches are Appropriate

“The Handlebar Moustache” is Heineken’s and W+K NY’s sequel to “The Snakeskin Jacket,” and like its predecessor, it takes a look a when certain bold fashion statements are appropriate. Of course, the handlebar moustache has become a hipster facial-hair fixture over the past few years, and Heineken has definitely been appealing to young 20-something urbanites since W+K Amsterdam’s “The Entrance” was released at the beginning of the year. Hell, they were even the official beer sponsor of Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago this past weekend, and plenty of Heineken Lite cups were devoured by indie rock snobs who indifferently listened to the offensive hate-rapping of OFWGKTA.

But, as has been the case with all of Heineken’s spots from 2011, we get memorable characters, a playful sense of humor and eye-popping cinematography. While “Snakeskin Jacket” was mostly about where not to wear your odd fashion of choice, “Handlebar Moustache” is about how awesome you could look entering into an early 1900s bare knuckle boxing match (and how a victory could snag you the dream girl). With Pabst Blue Ribbon on the brink of “selling out,” this brand has the foresight to target a market looking for an iconic beer of choice to rally behind, choosing to emphasize style over blue-collar credibility. Thus far, W+K is delivering in a big way. Credits after the jump.

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