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Posts Tagged ‘Brian Quinlan’

Pitch Does Disco Flashback for Burger King

Burger King made headlines earlier this year after deciding to leave global AOR Mother for David just as it had left CP+B for mcgarrybowen.

David’s most prominent work for the client to date concerned the debut of an especially colorful Whopper at San Francisco’s Gay Pride parade, but this new campaign reminds us that the chain continues to work with other agencies. The spot comes from Culver City shop Pitch, which has been working with BK for over a decade and was the only creative agency to survive Burger King’s January purge.

How many dated references appear in this ad?

Yes, the Yumbo is — or was — a real thing. Like the McRib, it appeared briefly and then grew tastier by virtue of its own absence.

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Mediabistro Course

Copywriting: Creative Ad Writing

Copywriting: Creative Ad WritingWork with a freelance copywriter to build your advertising portfolio and land more copywriting jobs! Starting January 12, Kim Taylor will teach you how to make a complete ad using graphics and photos, write strong headlines and body copy for various advertising media, work from a creative brief, and jumpstart your ad portfolio. Register now!

Innocean Debuts New Work for NRG

NRG recently announced that the energy company has chosen Innocean as its full-service advertising partner, and the agency debuted its first campaign for the brand in time for the opening of the NFL season.

Its 30-second broadcast spot imagines an old-time football team — complete with leather helmets — preparing to take on the (modern day) Philadelphia Eagles. “Let’s go out there and give ‘em heck,” says the team’s captain, adding “We’re going to go out there and really give them the business.” When the team, emerges from the locker room and sees their competitors, however, they quickly turn and run. “The old game just can’t compete,” says the voiceover, “especially when it comes to energy. Solar power is here.”

It’s not a bad analogy for old forms of energy, many of which have been around since the leather helmet days, in comparison with clean solar energy. The basic concept and approach also seem pretty adaptable to future applications, so more in this same vein from Innocean in the future.

“NRG chose Innocean because they understood that we aren’t bound by convention,” said Brad Fogel, chief operating officer, Innocean USA. “We are young and agile enough to break rules and create a spot-on integrated brand campaign that shows consumers, you actually have a choice in who you want to supply the energy to power up your day-to-day lives. And if you have that choice, why don’t you choose a company that believes in doing the right thing instead of the same thing?”

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TBWA\Chiat\Day Taps Peyton Manning, Cam Newton for Gatorade

The late comedian Mitch Hedberg had a joke that went: “You don’t have to be sweating and holding a basketball to enjoy a Gatorade, you can just be a thirsty dude. Gatorade forgets about this demographic. I’m thirsty for absolutely no reason, other than the fact that liquid has not touched my lips for some time. Can I have a Gatorade too, or does that lightning bolt mean no?” Well, the brand seems to have finally issued its response to this question in a new campaign from TBWA\Chiat\Day, entitled “Sweat it to Get it,” with a resounding “No, you can not have a Gatorade, thirsty dudes.”

“Gatorade was invented to replace what athletes sweat out, Brent Anderson, executive creative director at TBWA\Chiat\Day in Los Angeles, explained to Adweek. “So the intent was to create something that might cause someone who reaches for a Gatorade to think, ‘Hold up…have I earned this?’” In other words, that lightning bolt does mean no.

In the campaign, starring Rob Belushi (son of Jim) and featuring cameos from Peyton Manning and Cam Newton (who also stars in an ongoing Under Armour campaign), customers at a gas station are told they can’t purchase Gatorade because they haven’t broken a sweat. The ads all follow the same basic formula, with Belushi as the straight man denying the customers and Manning or Newton appearing as either the manager or a fellow customer. The agency told Adweek that the ads were all “shot on location at an actual convenience store with over 15 hidden cameras” and directed by Jody Hill (Eastbound and Down). Stick around for credits and a few more spots after the jump. Read more

McRib is Back, Alright!

Disclaimer: We were given the above spot from Arnold Worldwide on April 1, though were kindly asked to take it down as it was sent to us “in error” (which explains some of the older comments). As it turns out, the McRib was not quite back, as some had falsely speculated, at the time. However, now that the word is out that the McRib has, in fact, been officially resurrected as of today, we offer the TV commercial (which aired last November and was only released to media for “archiving purposes” on sites like our sibilng, AdsoftheWorld, months later) for your viewing pleasure. Party on.

The. McRib. Is. Back. Just when you thought it was gone forever, it returns, just like it does every spring (or fall or summer, depending on Mac Doh’s whims) and will continue to until the world ends or until McDonald’s merges with Subway to take over the world. And, you know what? People are going to talk about the McRib around your office. “Did you hear?” someone will ask, eyes wide with eager anticipation, McDonald’s grease-smelling sweat dripping onto your desk. “The McRib. It’s back dude. Just like the Backstreet Boys.” Indeed, it’s back.

But, before you throw over your work desk and “run” your out-of-shape self over to the nearest McRib feeding facility, we should mention that the McRib’s limited run is set to expire on Nov. 14. That gives you three whole weeks to gorge yourself on this 500-calorie combination of boneless patty, pickle slices, onions and BBQ sauce (aka McSlop), so if you want to make it all 21 days, proceed with caution. Last year’s McRib spot by Arnold Worldwide marked the end of a 16-year “hiatus” of the agency doing McRib work for the esteemed fast-food chain. It remains to be seen if the agency will get to launch America’s favorite sandwich again this time around. Credits after the jump.

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Method Man, Sour Patch Kids Roll Deep

You know what’s a real thug-ass candy? Sour Patch Kids, that’s what. Know how I know? Because Method Man, the 40-year-old rapper and actor of Wu-Tang Clan and How High fame, made a music video co-starring Sour Patch Kids running around his crib and messing around in his recording studio. If you don’t think teens and young adults can connect with this sort of product/celebrity placement on an emotional level, well, you just don’t get it.

From Mother NY comes the greatest Method Man-related collaboration since he teamed up with Mary J. Blige for the 1995 hit, “I’ll Be There for You/You’re All I Need to Get By.” This new track from Meth, “World Gone Sour (The Lost Kids),” will also be featured in a new Sour Patch Kids video game. However there’s no word as of now as to whether or not it will be featured on Method Man’s new album, The Crystal Meth, expected to be released this year after a string of delays.

To be perfectly honest, I’m amazed that Mother NY got a rap legend like Method Man to be the new spokesperson for this Kraft Foods candy brand, and I applaud Method Man for doing something more child-friendly as his focus is shifting from being a hardened representative of East Coast rap to being a family man. But, as has happened with names like Ice Cube, the target audience for this campaign doesn’t remember 36 Chambers or the impact that album had on the pop music landscape.

So, it’s kind of bittersweet that today’s youth might only think of Method Man as “that Sour Patch Kids guy,” as they probably already think of Ice Cube as “that TBS sitcom guy” or Dr. Dre as “that Dr. Pepper guy.” Admittedly, I saw Ray Charles play live before he passed away, and though I had heard of his impact on music (which was obviously much more significant than any of the aforementioned rappers) and in some way understood it, it was hard not to think of him as “that guy from the Pepsi commercials.” But, at the end of the day, maybe that’s alright. At least a new generation of consumers will know the stars of yesteryear in some way. Credits after the jump.

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