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Posts Tagged ‘Brian Smego’

Y&R Reveals Car Fox Den

If you’ve watched Car Fax’s spots featuring their Car Fox mascot and wondered where exactly he lives and how he gets his information (who are you?), Y&R’s new Car Fax spot will leave you one very satisfied, strange individual by answering both of these questions.

Y&R’s new 30 second spot, “Mole” introduces the Car Fox den, which acts as the center of the Car Fox’s elaborate operation (and presumably also his home). It also introduces another animal working in conjunction with the Car Fox and his team to “dig up” accident reports (I think you can guess this one). The spot builds on a character people immediately associate with brand (thanks, puns) to promote its selling points, which makes it easier to overlook its cheesiness. Also, I’m pretty sure fox dens aren’t 100 feet underground, but whatever. Credits after the jump. Read more

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Sears’ Diehard Batteries Will Survive the Zombie Apocalypse

Including a narrative is usually a good way for a commercial to hook the audience with creativity, but this Y&R Midwest zombie spot for Sears actually overdoes the narrative focus to the point where the  brand association is almost negligible. We know, zombies are popular, but it seems like the creatives put more time into the character development of the actors than organically integrating the product. Somebody really enjoys The Walking Dead.

The setup: a girl and a guy running from zombies try to escape in separate cars. The guy’s car won’t start, but the girl’s car has a Diehard battery that is still kicking even after the apocalypse, which is conceptually clever. But, the 70-second running time is too long for the two-second insert shot of a Diehard battery at the very end. If the first 35 seconds of the ad were cut, the relevant story points would still be in tact. There’s also a #SurviveZombies for brand engagement, but if you want or need a reliable car battery, you probably don’t care about hashtags or zombies. Credits after jump.

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