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Posts Tagged ‘Bryan Holt’

DDB California, Kingsford Want You to ‘Get Off Your Gas’

With barbecue season right around the corner, DDB California has a new campaign for Kingsford Charcoal, complete with the new tagline, “Get Off Your Gas.”

In the 30-second broadcast spot, “The Social Grill,” DDB California pokes fun at the cultural obsession with social media. As attendees of a fun-looking  backyard barbecue look on, a man’s next door neighbor uses his “Social Grill,” a gas grill with social media capabilities. The man, grilling alone, takes a selfie and uses the grill’s speech activation and other goofy features, while the barbecue attendees simply relax and grill up some tasty grub. In addition to the TV spot, the campaign also features online videos and digital skins on About.com as well as Kingsford-owned social channels. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

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Drugfree.org, DDB SF Attempt to ‘Rise Above’ the Influence

From DDB’s San Francisco office come three new TV spots for The Partnership @ Drugfree.org’s long-running “Above the Influence” campaign.

Before we dive into these, I’d like to draw your attention to the recent, horrifying anti-meth PSAs we saw from Darren Aronofsky. On a surface level, the PSAs couldn’t look more different, with Aronofsky employing heavy fear tactics and DDB SF attempting to communicate with teenagers using messaging that hinges on positive reinforcement. However, what the two series of PSAs have in common is the fact that each depicts an unrealistic portrayal of drug use. In Aronofsky’s PSAs, a single taste of meth leads to a suicide attempt, and in the above spot, a lack of drinking and smoking weed leads to a teen leaping to school on rooftops a la Spider-Man. Sure, it’s a “visual metaphor,” but as a teen, I viewed this sort of advertising as condescending. After all, it doesn’t take a pharmaceutical degree to know that it’s actually the kids smoking weed that are, in a sense, “flying.”

Here’s the thing, teenagers who read AgencySpy (I know you’re out there): Trying a drug once is not going to kill you, nor will it make you immediately addicted to said drug. However, do too much of a drug, ANY drug, and it will have a substantial negative impact on your life. From a teen’s perspective, though, most things in the world are black and white. To them, drugs have to be either good or bad, so the logical marketing strategy is to portray them as evil vices that will lead to a teen’s untimely demise. We’ve come a long way from “This is Your Brain on Drugs,” but is there a honest, realistic way to depict drug use so teens can make an informed decision their own? So, dear commenters, do we do so through positive reinforcement, fear, or a combination of the two?

Two more spots from DDB SF (including one that employs the “fear factor”) and credits for the one above after the jump.

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