TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote SocialTimes AllFacebook FishbowlNY FishbowlDC PRNewser 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Conor Fisher’

Tribal Worldwide Shows ‘How to Dad’ for Peanut Butter Cheerios

Tribal Worldwide, Toronto has a new Canadian online campaign for Peanut Butter Cheerios illustrating “How to Dad.”

The father in the spot is a welcome departure from the idiotic paternal human punchlines still typical in advertising. He gives a quick, ADD style lecture on fathering while touring his house, after being awoken by his son modeling his new horse mask (which he reacts to remarkably well). The product integration is at times a bit awkward, the word “awesome” appears too many times (including twice in one sentence in the line “Because being a dad is awesome, just like new Peanut Butter Cheerios are awesome,”delivered near the spot’s conclusion) and the ending really takes the goofiness level over the top. Still, it’s nice to see dads represented this way, so we’ll chalk it up as a step in the right direction and a sign that perhaps the idiot dad stereotype is finally on its way out.

The campaign also features a Tumblr with fathering advice for those who want to step up their dad game and a #HowToDad hashtag which the brand hopes will generate discussion amongst paternal consumers. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Here Are All the Black People

Here Are All the Black PeopleOn September 24, land your dream job in advertising and design at the premier multicultural career fair taking place at the Metropolitan Pavilion in NYC. Workshop your portfolio, attend mentoring sessions, learn from industry leaders, network with your peers, and most importantly, launch your career. Register now!

Toronto Shop Bemoans ‘Stupidification of Society’ in Short Films for TED Event

We here at the Spy couldn’t help but be reminded of Mike Judge‘s highly underrated 2006 film, Idiocracy, when checking out these shorts from Toronto-based agency, Capital C. The shop paints a bleak portrait of a social media-addled future hinged on 6-second sound bites versus long-form content and one which lacks any thought-provoking communique. Yes folks, behold the “Stupidification of Society,” which Capital C created pro-bono for the  TEDxColumbiaSIPA conference that took place in New York on May 8. According to the agency’s chief creative officer, Gary Watson, the films “The Vine Effect” (above) and “The Glass Era” (below) “…very much play into cultural and digital trends. Shortened attention spans. Technology overload. Things that get in the way of spending time with inspirational content that ultimately makes a difference in our lives.”

Short films lamenting the loss of longer-form content? Oh, the irony, but perhaps that’s the point of all this to begin with. Full credits after the jump.

Read more

john st. Launches ‘Surrogaid’ for War Child Canada

“What if you could help mother children in war-affected areas? What if you could virtually reach out and literally provide them the warmth of a mother’s hug?” These questions are the genesis of john st.’s new campaign for War Child, which attempts to dupe viewers into believing they can provide virtual motherhood services at the click of a button. The message they recieve — either tat the end of the campaign video (above) or after attempting to provide these services at the campaign website (where the interactive web experience was designed by Jam 3) — is “You can’t donate motherhood. But you can donate money.”

Arriving (obviously) just in time for Mother’s Day, the campaign attempts to raise money and awareness for War Child Canada, a charity helping children in war torn areas, while motherhood is on people’s minds. The campaign includes broadcast, online, radio, and out-of-home components.

“We wanted to make it seem plausible that you could donate the act of motherhood online”, explains Stephen Jurisic, ECD of john st. advertising. “But of course you can’t. Only real mothers in these war-affected countries can provide their children with that.”

James Topham of War Child Canada adds, “We thought this was a fresh way to remind people just how important mothers are to the healthy development of children – particularly in the context of war. And that the best way to support them is still the easiest – by donating money.” Credits after the jump. Read more

Grip Limited Raises Testicular Cancer Awareness with Ballsy Campaign


Toronto-based Grip Limited have a new campaign for Testicular Cancer Canada that’s, well, ballsy.

The agency employed risque humor to raise testicular cancer awareness and get more guys to self-examine regularly. Built around the tagline, “No one’s going to check them for you,” Grip’s two TV spots, directed by Matt Swanson, show men receiving testicular exams from unexpected sources, resulting in some pretty ridiculous (and funny) situations. In the first, and more successful spot, “Cop,” a guy is pulled over for a broken taillight. “Let me see your driver’s license,” says the cop, “….aaaand your testicles.” The humor in the spot comes from the resultant avoidance (and non-avoidance) of eye contact and awkward looks during the exam. “Mechanic” is basically the same idea, but with a mechanic in an auto body shop instead of a cop. It could just be that I viewed “Cop” first, but something about it just wasn’t as funny. Nevertheless, both spots make admirable use of humor to make a message that’s all too often forgotten memorable, an admirable accomplishment, especially when you consider the prevalence of testicular cancer.

“Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men ages 15-29”, explained Testicular Cancer Canada founder Cheryl Perry explained . “If you try to sit these guys down and teach them something, they might tune you out. But if you make them laugh, they’ll remember what you’re saying”.

In addition to the TV spots, the integrated campaign, which is timed to coincide with Testicular Cancer Awareness Month, also features radio advertising from Pirate Toronto and an online testicular cancer “remote scanner.” As you might have guessed, the remote scanner asks dudes to place their balls on their phone screen only to display an error message telling them to check their balls themselves. Stick around for credits and “Mechanic” after the jump. Read more

Production Duo Celebrates ‘Gran Turismo’ 15th Anniversary by Honoring its Creator

Producers Tamir Moscovici and Paul Proulx, the creative production team behind Urban Outlaw and Painting Coconuts , decided to mark the 15th anniversary of Sony’s landmark Gran Turismo series (and recent release of Gran Turismo 6) with a documentary profiling “the single-minded genius behind Gran Turismo’s birth and breathtaking 15-year evolution,” Kazunori Yamauchi.

KAZ: Pushing the Virtual Divide is a one hour, 24 minute documentary examining the drive and devotion Yamauichi has put into Gran Turismo from its birth through its incredible evolution over the past 15 years. Since the first Gran Turismo game in 1997, the game Yamauchi had wanted to make since he was fifteen years old, he has always gone above and beyond expectations in creating the best games possible. Yamauchi has been one of the most important and interesting figures in gaming over the past 15 years, with a singular devotion to giving gamers the ultimate driving experience. His insane devotion to detail in his racing simulation series can be traced to his love for racing and all things automotive — he really races himself, and often wins. This offers him a unique understanding of what racing is all about, something he brings into each of his games.

If you’re a gamer, and especially if you’re a fan of the Gran Turismo series, it’s a really intriguing — and sometimes nostalgic — look at one of Sony’s most iconic gaming series and the incredible man behind them. Check out the trailer above, and, if you’re interested, head on over to Hulu for the complete documentary. Credits after the jump. Read more

In john st.’s World, Fear is Key to Great Brand Experiences

WPP-owned, Toronto-based john st. continues in its great annual tradition of taking the piss out of the industry as part of its pitch for Strategy‘s Agency of the Year awards (we covered fellow Toronto agency Lowe Roche’s entry earlier today). In its follow-up to last year’s introduction of a “professional clicking service” called Buyral, john st. gets more aggressive, scaring the bejeezus out of total strangers (well, at least let’s play along) as part of the a new marketing strategy that the agency’s christened “exFEARiential.”

It’s just as absurd/amusing, if not more so, than previous john st. AOY videos including Buyral as well as predecessors, Catvertising and Pink Ponies. It looks like we aren’t the only ones that get a kick out of “exFEARiential” as it picked up Best Agency Video at the Strategy awards, where john st. also took home gold for Agency of the Year and bronze for Digital Agency of the Year. FYI, if you stick around til the end of the clip, you can click on separate videos of the stress tests featured above (or if you’re just unwilling to wait, go here and here). Credits after the jump.

Read more

Short Film Projects Scary Look at Future of Technology

What if people only interacted through text messaging? They could still meet up and walk around together, but is our world headed for non-verbal communication ruled by Autocorrect? These are the questions at the root of “The Dystopianest Dystopia Ever,” a short film written and directed by freelance copywriter Jon Murray, who most recently worked at Leo Burnett, Toronto.

In the short film, a guy and a girl meet outdoors with cell phones in hand, ready to talk by texting. People no longer communicate with eye contact or use their vocal cords, but the guy has his epiphany that will undermine the “dystopianest dystopia.” If our future is headed in that direction, doctors who treat Carpal Tunnel Syndrome should be patting themselves on the back.

The video is only two minutes, but it packs an efficient punch. And even if you don’t care about the future of technology, it’s a well-done creative project that you can watch for free, so why not support? Credits after the jump.

Read more