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Posts Tagged ‘Dave Gibson’

The Martin Agency Introduces ‘The Hopsons’ for Benjamin Moore

The Martin Agency would like you to “Meet the Hopsons,” a family who live in a giant bouncy house.

The Hopsons fell in love with their neighborhood but, since all the houses have vinyl siding, they assumed they couldn’t paint theirs. Since they love color, this was a problem. The Hopsons came up with an unusual solution and decided to live in a giant bouncy house. And so begin the whacky adventures of “Meet the Hopsons.” At over two minutes the premise, which might have made for a fun 30-second spot, feels stretched far too thin, and it’s not until the last 30 seconds or so that the idea is tied to Benjamin Moore’s Revive paint for vinyl siding. Still, “Meet the Hopsons” is not entirely without some degree of quirky charm. It’s just hard to believe anyone would stick around long enough to see Benjamin Moore’s product presented as the solution. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

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Martin, Benjamin Moore Scare the Crap Out of Contractors

Some good Halloween fun for you today…

Martin Agency client Benjamin Moore, and Tool director Jason Zada wanted to show that their Ultra Spec 500 paint goes on quick to get the project finished when you need it most — like when you’re scared shitless.

So they gave a group of painters a nightmare assignment: painting a wall in a “haunted” hotel. Upon arrival, the painters are told that “Years ago people with mental diseases were kept here for a period of time.” Once they start working, Benjamin Moore starts making all kinds of spooky things happen: strange noises, a rocking chair moving on its own, a chandelier rocking back and forth. “I don’t fool with no ghosts,” says one perturbed contractor.

The prank reaches its climax when the lights go out and a woman dressed as a ghost emerges, screaming. Predictably, the contractors freak out before the elaborate hoax is revealed. Their reactions are pretty priceless, and you’ve got to appreciate a prank like this in October. That the painting job was never finished does take away from the spot’s supposed intention, although most people probably won’t notice. There’s more horror-styled fun at Benjamin Moore’s “Scary Good Job” website, where contractors (or just people who need a lot of paint?) can enter to win a 500-gallon supply of Ultra Spec 500.

You can check out the “Testimonials” video after the jump, in which painters share their own horror stories of “nightmare” jobs. Credits follow. Read more

Toyota Development is Rather Bombastic, Fueled by Nazareth

There are industry secrets us laymen will always have questions about.  For filmmakers, how do you make it look like one actor is playing twins?  For McDonald’s employees, what exactly is in your special sauce?  And for laundresses, where the heck are all my socks?

I have to admit, how Toyota thermal tests their cars during development isn’t high on my list of curiosities.  Though I suppose it’s always good to know.   Aussie agency Publicis Mojo’s latest spot for Toyota shows a procession of cars on a track, in a giant warehouse, being alternately frozen and heat-blasted by machines resembling an X-treme carwash set-up.

“During development, we’ll thermal test a car to see how every part of it reacts when pushed to its limits,” says the Aussie voiceover.  ”It may seem excessive, but that’s how we test for quality.  That’s what makes it a Toyota.”

I often think of the Prius as the emblem of my generation: my parents were the first to baby-proof their houses, and my friends and I are the first to buy hybrid cars.  But, I wonder if the company is still fighting to recover from last year’s bad press amidst rumors of slipping standards and poor quality production. I get it, when we think Toyota, they want us to think quality, hence the technician in the Eskimo suit and vehicle-rotisserie. But, do they also want us to to think heavy metal because they are playing Nazareth in the background? Toyotas are sensible. They’re just not that rock and roll. Credits after the jump.

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