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Posts Tagged ‘Johnny Cash’

W+K, Sofia Coppola Craft Holiday Efforts for Gap

Sofia Coppola (The Virgin Suicides, Lost in Translation) is the latest marquee Hollywood director enlisted for Wieden+Kennedy’s “Dress Normal” campaign for Gap, following David Fincher‘s efforts in August and taking the reigns of four holiday  spots — a pair each for broadcast and online.

The ads spin the “Dress Normal” tagline by showing some abnormal (and often cringe-inducing) family holiday moments. But then what’s more normal than pondering the family you’ll never understand? Each spot ends with the message “You don’t have to get them to give them Gap” preceding the tagline. It’s an interesting approach, positioning Gap as a gift for those family members you have no idea what to give to, but it sits well with the “Dress Normal” tagline and Coppola and company do a good job of making it work in most of the ads.

In perhaps the most successful of the spots, “Gauntlet” a girl returns home to her large, boisterous, and often odd family. Perfectly set to the Johnny Cash song “I Got Stripes,” she makes her way through the house greeting her relatives with an awkward expression on her face that says a lot about the effort she’s putting in to deal with these people. It feels like a telling glance into the lives of a particular family, which is the approach taken throughout these efforts and, along with some great song selections, what makes them charming. The other broadcast spot, “Mistletoe,” documents a particularly cringe-worthy moment under the mistletoe at a holiday party. It’s almost hard to watch, but then that makes it fit the “You don’t have to get them to give them Gap” all the more.

In addition to the two online ads — “Crooner” and “Pinball” — the campaign is supported by print and OOH elements, as well as digital banner ads launching on Gap’s social media channels and GapGiftGuide.com on November 3rd. Read more

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Friday Odds and Ends

-Deutsch LA and director Noam Murro (with a little help from Johnny Cash) have teamed up yet again for VW, this time showing how a hungry dog is no match for the Jetta’s keyless access (above).

-Lionsgate has launched a media agency consolidation review. link

-Nike designer Darrin Crescenzi, who created brand identity for the Livestrong campaign among several other projects, has re-imagined Game of Thrones’ sigils. link

-Former Dachis Group CSO Peter Kim has joined R/GA as managing director of business transformation. link

-Ogilvy CEO Miles Young says that brands’ emphasis these days is on harnessing ‘big data’ to get more creative. link

-Wonderful: All new Kindle Fires will be stuck with “Special Offers” aka ads. link

-Stuart Elliott at The New York Times spotlights KBS+P’s recent crowdsourcing competition. link

Nike Celebrates Title IX, Female Athletes with ‘Voices’

It’s been 17 years since Nike and W+K’s stirring “If You Let Me Play” campaign first put the spotlight firmly on young female athletes. And, almost two decades since its debut, there’s still something about hearing little girls recite facts like “If you let me play sports, I’ll be more likely to leave a man who beats me,” that can cut to the emotional core of viewers. Utilizing what would become a much-copied, shocking yet simple style of delivering statistics, “If You Let Me Play” is a standout among a brand-agency partnership that consistently turns out innovative work. And, while other spots came close (W+K’s Maria Sharapova-starring “Pretty” spot from 2006, for one), none would have the impact “If You Let Me Play” still has on female athletes.

Saturday marked the 40th anniversary of Title IX, the groundbreaking piece of legislation that established gender equality in educational programs that receive Federal funding. Since going into effect, Title IX is most often used to apply to school athletic programs, used to ensure that girls get as many opportunities to play sports as their male counterparts. In “Voices,” Nike and W+K celebrate this anniversary in a TV spot that immediately brings to mind “If You Let Me Play.” Shot by Mark Romanek, one of our favorite commercial, film and music video directors who’s no stranger to Nike, “Voices” features marathoner Joan Benoit Samuelson, boxer Marlen Esparaza and basketball stars Lisa Leslie and Diana Taurasi directly addressing the viewer about their own experiences with gender discrimination.

While it isn’t on par with “If You Let Me Play,” “Voices” does serve as strong rallying point for both female and male athletes, especially with the Summer Olympics just over a month away. The campaign will also feature a #MAKETHERULES hashtag on Twitter tomorrow for those in the social media realm that would like to spread the word.

JWT Debuts ‘Brand USA’ Effort. You’re Welcome, World

Nearly nine months after picking up global AOR duties for the Corporation for Travel Promotion, JWT has finally unveiled its first marketing campaign for the government-created entity that was set up to help spur more international travel to the US. Dubbed “Brand USA,” JWT’s campaign for the CTP includes the above 60-second spot, which features Johnny Cash‘s daughter Roseanne and her song “Land of Dreams” and takes us through beaches, bayous and cityscapes that make Murrica, well, Murrica.

The tune’s a bit too folksy/hokey for our tastes, but it seems to fit the spot, which will perhaps resonate in international markets (advertising will initially roll out in the United Kingdom, Japan and Canada on May 1). As expected, all the social/online components come into play in “Brand USA,” including Facebook, Twitter and, of course, Pinterest. Well, was it worth the nine-month wait? Guess we’re already in the good ol’ US of A, it’s not for us to judge. Credits after the jump.

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