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Posts Tagged ‘Liz Dussault’

One Twenty Three West Trades Montana’s BBQ for Goods/Services

What can you pay for with barbecue?

A massage, yoga and MMA lessons, flowers and a psychic reading, at least according to One Two Three West’s new spot for Montana’s Cookhouse & Bar. The agency supposedly only paid for the actor/host, while the rest of the people in the spot are real employees of businesses with whom they bartered barbecue for goods and services. They do add some believability by showing some people refuse the transaction, and if hungry and presented with a big plate of barbecue goodness it’s not hard to imagine agreeing to such a bargain. It’s a clever idea, regardless of authenticity, although they certainly could have trimmed some of the fat off the spot’s two minutes. “Paid For In BBQ” will run “in cinemas across Canada, on TSN and online pre-roll,” with a number of smaller spots showing the individual transactions hosted on the brand’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

“We thought the best way to create awareness of the new Best of BBQ Sampler Event at Montana’s would be to literally bring the BBQ food to people in a creative way,” said Scot Keith, founder and managing director, One Twenty Three West. “It allowed us to create a number of great content opportunities and was a lot of fun to do.”

Stick around for “MMA Paid For In BBQ” and “Psychic Reading Paid For In BBQ,” along with credits, after the jump. Read more

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john st. Launches ‘Surrogaid’ for War Child Canada

“What if you could help mother children in war-affected areas? What if you could virtually reach out and literally provide them the warmth of a mother’s hug?” These questions are the genesis of john st.’s new campaign for War Child, which attempts to dupe viewers into believing they can provide virtual motherhood services at the click of a button. The message they recieve — either tat the end of the campaign video (above) or after attempting to provide these services at the campaign website (where the interactive web experience was designed by Jam 3) — is “You can’t donate motherhood. But you can donate money.”

Arriving (obviously) just in time for Mother’s Day, the campaign attempts to raise money and awareness for War Child Canada, a charity helping children in war torn areas, while motherhood is on people’s minds. The campaign includes broadcast, online, radio, and out-of-home components.

“We wanted to make it seem plausible that you could donate the act of motherhood online”, explains Stephen Jurisic, ECD of john st. advertising. “But of course you can’t. Only real mothers in these war-affected countries can provide their children with that.”

James Topham of War Child Canada adds, “We thought this was a fresh way to remind people just how important mothers are to the healthy development of children – particularly in the context of war. And that the best way to support them is still the easiest – by donating money.” Credits after the jump. Read more

Jacknife, Stoli Go Back to the Original French Exit

For the new campaign for Stoli Vodka, Toronto shop Jacknife asked directors to tell an origin story of their choice. Stoli’s tagline is “The Original Vodka for Original People,” whatever the hell that means, but the origin-story theme can make for some interesting recreations. Director Sean Wainsteim decided to focus his efforts on the origin of The French Exit, when people leave a party without saying goodbye. We’ve all been there. A clingy come-on at a bar, friends of friends who you don’t really know that well, the weird Uncle. For the anti-social, goodbyes are unnecessary social conventions usually meant for people you don’t care about.

You’ve probably never heard of Bentley Theodore French, but he invented The French Exit while at a stuffy, waspy party that may be set in the 1930s, at least according to Stoli’s two-minute narrative ad. Bentley even passes up the chance to dance with two ladies at the same time on his way out the door. I’m not sure why he’s at this party if he dislikes everyone in attendance, but he is a social innovator who will never be forgotten. I still use his work to this day. Credits after the jump.

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Cossette Launches Bats**t Crazy ‘Competition Crunch’ Campaign for Oatmeal Crisp

People like crunchy cereal. Oatmeal Crisp is a cereal that is crunchy. Cossette took this idea and handed it to a bunch of deranged copy writers who escaped from a mental institution. The result is their batshit crazy new campaign, “Competition Crunch.”

The four spots that comprise the campaign all feature varying degrees of absurd, random humor. Think of recent Old Spice campaigns for a point of reference, though that only gives you the basic idea. For whatever reason, Oatmeal Crisp’s spokesman is a Scottish dude in a kilt, who introduces “Competition Crunch.” Each spot features a new opponent for Oatmeal Crisp — a hungry tortoise, a ginger wedding, an elitist marionette, and romantic robots. That should give you some idea of the kind of crazy we’re talking about. This is filed in our “What The…?” category for a reason.

The spot featured above (my favorite), “Hungry Tortoise Vs. Oatmeal Crisp” presents a hungry tortoise, for absolutely no apparent reason on a Japanese game show, eating a crunchy head of lettuce. Our Scottish spokesman admits that the hungry tortoise eating a head of lettuce is very crunchy, but it’s no match for Oatmeal Crisp. Believe it or not, this is on the less crazy side of the campaign. Out of all the spots, it comes the closest to making sense.The only tamer spot might be the “Romantic Robot” spot, in which two romantically inclined robots make a toast and break their glasses.

On the crazier side, we have “Elitist Marionette” and “Ginger Wedding.” What can even be said about these? “Elitist Marionette” centers around — you guessed it — an elitist marionette who flaunts his “100% Egyptian cotton” strings, and his overall superiority to a second marionette. Then the puppeteer controlling him loses his cool and repeatedly stomps on him. Yes, it’s as crazy as it sounds. “Ginger Wedding” almost matches its mishigas, when a wedding of gingerbread people is interrupted by the Aflack duck, who massacres the congregation. If you’ve ever wanted to hear a church full of screaming gingerbread people, this is probably your only opportunity.

These spots are worth a chuckle and/or befuddled stare, but I’m not sure what they’ll do to sell Oatmeal Crisp. Check out “Ginger Wedding” below, and “Elitist Marionette” (along with credits) after the jump.
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In john st.’s World, Fear is Key to Great Brand Experiences

WPP-owned, Toronto-based john st. continues in its great annual tradition of taking the piss out of the industry as part of its pitch for Strategy‘s Agency of the Year awards (we covered fellow Toronto agency Lowe Roche’s entry earlier today). In its follow-up to last year’s introduction of a “professional clicking service” called Buyral, john st. gets more aggressive, scaring the bejeezus out of total strangers (well, at least let’s play along) as part of the a new marketing strategy that the agency’s christened “exFEARiential.”

It’s just as absurd/amusing, if not more so, than previous john st. AOY videos including Buyral as well as predecessors, Catvertising and Pink Ponies. It looks like we aren’t the only ones that get a kick out of “exFEARiential” as it picked up Best Agency Video at the Strategy awards, where john st. also took home gold for Agency of the Year and bronze for Digital Agency of the Year. FYI, if you stick around til the end of the clip, you can click on separate videos of the stress tests featured above (or if you’re just unwilling to wait, go here and here). Credits after the jump.

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Skittles ‘Gif Raps’ the Holidays

Remove the “t” from “gift” and the “w” from “wrap” and you end up with “Gif Rap,” Skittles’ digital holiday card from BBDO Toronto.

Animated gifs have had quite a resurgence of popularity in 2011. Is it that hipsters enjoy gifs’ “vintage Internet” aesthetic? Is it that mobile apps like “Gif Shop” have made animated gifs easier to make than ever? Is it because quickmeme made adding personalized Impact text over images too easy? Whatever the case, we’ve already seen them used in two separate agency holiday cards so far.

Gif Rap the Rainbow” is exactly what it sounds like, allowing users to select between four Santa-themed animated gifs and four hip-hop beats to combine for a personalized holiday greeting. If you’re wondering what the above image looks like when animated, click here. Credits after the jump.

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