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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Pitchford’

Cutwater Brings Intel to the Coffee Shop

Agency Cutwater teamed up with production company Cap Gun Collective for a series of comedic shorts promoting Intel’s Chromebook.

Set in a coffee shop, the shorts are based around the premise of computer problems happening in the real world. Unfortunately, the scenarios presented seem a little bit dated. In “Monotaskers,” for example, a woman at a coffee shop won’t let a man do more than one thing at a time, taking his book while he sips his coffee. “Frozen Coffee” presents a glitchy barista, which is funny in a way, but also seems removed from the current technological climate (as is the case with “Monotaskers”). Since, at the end of these spots, Intel’s Chromebook is presented as the solution, it’s as if Intel’s competition is presented as computers from the previous decade, rather than modern competitors. That doesn’t do a whole lot to represent the Chromebook in a good light, and leaves viewers with little reason to pick it up over its real-world competition. Read more

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Microsoft Advertising, twofifteenmccann Talk to Unlikely Visionaries

Tapping into kids’ insight is no new tactic, but who can fault an agency for once again asking wide-eyed young “visionaries” to inspire the future? Kids are so charmingly stuttering, so clearly genuine, that they bring a persuasive power to any cause. San Francisco’s twofifteenmccann’s latest work for Microsoft Advertising is no exception.

The agency debuted this film at Cannes last week. Backed by uplifting piano notes, a handful of children talk about their visions for technological innovation, including smart refrigerators (“…Pizza! It’d be like, ‘whooosh!’”) and virtual dressing rooms (for ninja outfits in particular). As each child recounts their vision, an animated prototype of the technology floats next to them.

As hopeful as this ad is, there inevitably comes a point when kids stop thinking quite so big, and instead adopt trademark adult cynicism. Let’s hope Microsoft Advertising really can activate child-like wonder and imagination as they do their work. Many of these kids’ ideas are already on their way—what will they (adults and children) think of next?

Credits after the jump.

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