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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Wolff’

Tuesday Morning Stir

-Former Adweek editor Michael Wolff tells us what he thinks the ad biz is sorely lacking. link

-A little bit of Halls adds plenty of swagger in a new effort from Ogilvy Cape Town (above).

-L.A.-based post-production company Therapy signed multi-disciplinary editor Lenny Mesina to its roster.

-Sir Martin Sorrell says “horizontiality” will be WPP’s focus come 2013. link

-Those damn bots are costing online advertisers $1.5 billion a year in wasted ad spend. link

-Ogilvy Chicago CD/copywriter Andrew Gall and freelance designer/Cramer-Krasselt alum Matt Webb are behind a new chooose-your-own-adventure book dubbed Make Your Own Bucket List. link

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So Long, Mr. Wolff

Well, we gave Michael Wolff until the end of the year, but it looks like Prometheus Global Media couldn’t wait that long. The parent company of Adweek has announced that the Murdoch-obsessed media maven will be leaving his post as editorial director of the trade and will be replaced by executive editor Jim Cooper, who will oversee day-to-day Adweek operations, effective immediately (here’s a letter from Cooper to Adweek readers).

A month back, the New York Post (along with Gawker) reported that Prometheus was looking to replace Wolff, which wasn’t too much of a shock considering the detour Adweek had taken under his watch after its relaunch. Of course, now that the parties are parting ways, the niceties come out. Wolff says in a statement, “I’ve had a fantastic time at Adweek. It’s been my privilege to be part of the brilliant transformation of the magazine and site. I can’t rave enough about Adweek’s remarkable staff. I am sad to leave but sure the talent here will continue to do great things. I’m grateful to everybody at Prometheus for giving me this opportunity and this wonderful year.”

What a year it’s been. Let’s take a stroll down memory lane and remember what Wolff told us six months back about the new Adweek.

 

So, Michael Wolff’s Time at ‘Adweek’ Has Apparently Come to an End

Hamilton Nolan at Gawker is reporting that the Michael Wolff era at Adweek is drawing to a close. Wow, we really didn’t see this coming. Actually, we gave Wolff the benefit of the doubt and said he’d last until December. Apparently, those 10 trillion Rupert Murdoch-related items were not enough to appease parent company Prometheus, which Nolan says is looking to bring on an editor with closer ties to the ad world. Let’s remember the good times below, shall we?

 

Michael Wolff’s Time at Adweek Might Be Up

How did we not see this coming? Keith Kelly and Claire Atkinson at the New York Post are reporting that Prometheus Global Media, parent of Adweek, is looking to replace our old pal and editorial director Michael Wolff because there seem to be some creative differences regarding Adweek’s direction. Sources tell the Post that “Jimmy Finkelstein, who hired Wolff to overhaul Adweek after several candidates turned him down, now thinks Wolff is a controversial highbrow who has alienated old-line Madison Avenue types.”

Wolff, though, seems surprised by the whole situation, telling Gawker, “I hope I don’t get fired. And nobody, except the New York Post, has yet told me I’m about to be.” If the situation does indeed turn out for the worst, at least we’ll always have the above and the bazillion Rupert Murdoch-related stories posted that have been posted on Adweek since the relaunch.

Wait, That’s Not Ben Walker

Here’s a classic sports news blooper that comes to us courtesy of the BBC, which mistakes our old pal, Adweek editor Michael Wolff, for Associated Press baseball scribe Ben Walker. Watch the awkward silence that ensues, then Wolff’s great comment and finally the awkward cut back to the newsman. As you see below, it’s easy to, um, confuse the two.

(via Daily What and Yahoo! Sports)

Adweek’s Michael Wolff: ‘The New York Times is a Bore’

In the final installment of our Media Beat interview with Adweek editorial director Michael Wolff, the veteran media man discusses his news aggregation operation, Newser.com, which is among Salon.com’s personal favorites. Wolff says among other things, that in his long history of starting businesses, “[Newser] is the best experience I’ve ever had,” adding that it serves its purpose because “people have a need for shorter information.”

Part 1: Adweek’s Michael Wolff: ‘We Really Bring Together Buyer and Seller’

Part 2: Adweek’s Michael Wolff Talks NYT Paywall, the State of News Corp


FYI, you can also watch this video and others in the Media Beat series on mediabistro.com’s YouTube channel
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Adweek’s Michael Wolff Talks NYT Paywall, the State of News Corp

In part two of our Media Beat discussion with Adweek editorial director Michael Wolff, the media vet discusses his thoughts on the New York Times paywall, saying among other things, if it doesn’t work, then “the Times is imperiled.” Of course, what discussion with Wolff wouldn’t include the topic of News Corp and its chief Rupert Murdoch, who our interviewee profiled in his 2008 book, The Man Who Owns the News. In this clip, Wolff offers his theories on what the future holds for the gigantic media entity.

Part 1: Adweek’s Michael Wolff: ‘We Really Bring Together Buyer and Seller’

Stay tuned for part three with Michael Wolff tomorrow. In the meantime, you can also watch this video on mediabistro.com’s YouTube channel.

Adweek’s Michael Wolff: ‘We Really Bring Together Buyer and Seller’

Though our time with Adweek editorial director Michael Wolff together came to a rather interesting end, the veteran journalist had plenty to say during our three-part Media Beat chat. In this first installment, Wolff, who took over the editorial reins at AdWeekMedia last October, discusses the relaunch of Adweek, its current role/purpose in the industry and the trade’s relationship with parent company, Prometheus Global Media. Regarding the revamp of Adweek, Wolff says, “It was a very necessary, obvious and even inevitable thing that had to happen.”

Stay tuned for part two with Michael Wolff tomorrow. In the meantime, you can also watch this video on mediabistro.com’s YouTube channel.

Adweek Becomes ‘The Voice of Media’

It looks like our sources were right. Starting the week of April 18, Michael Wolff’s version of Adweek will see the light of day and come with the tagline, “The Voice of Media.” Guess the “ad” part is basically rendered inessential at this point, but anyhow, the above image is part of the prototype for Prometheus Global Media‘s master plan with the brand. Now, let’s play a guessing game as to who that forehead and mop top belongs to.

We Hear: Wolff Cleans House at Adweek

It didn’t take long for Michael Wolff to make an impact at Adweek. Multiple sources are telling us that Wolff, who became editorial director of E5 Global’s Adweek Group in October, is looking to remake the magazine into more of a “media-focused” entity (still deciphering that one) and as a result, veteran industry scribes like Barbara Lippert (pictured), Jim English and Mark Dolliver have been shown the door (along with two others we’ve yet to identify).

Lippert, who had been with Adweek for over 20 years and was most recently editor-at-large, is perhaps the most significant cut, having been somewhat of a face for the publication via her appearances and opinions on shows like Oprah, CBS’ The Early Show, 60 Minutes and Charlie Rose. We’re hearing that Wolff, who has been a contributing editor and columnist for Vanity Fair, wants to start from scratch with Adweek. We’ll see if his roll of the dice pays off.