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Posts Tagged ‘Miguel Salek’

Mullen, Psyop Somehow Make Yogurt Look Visceral, Sexy

Mullen has debuted its first creative effort for its new client, Greek yogurt brand FAGE, and suffice to say, this isn’t your average Dannon, Yoplait or Activia spot. The campaign has been dubbed “Plain Extraordinary” featuring a lyrical rhyme that tells the story of how “Plain became so much more than more than plain” or something to that effect which is mouthed from someone who may or may not be Willem Dafoe (if so, the man has found a second career).

Mullen Mark Wenneker says in a statement, “If our advertising is half as good as the yogurt, I will be pleased.” We’ll let you be the judge of that, but in addition to the broadcast component, there’s a website re-design included along with a Facebook page and Twitter stream. View full credits after the jump.

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LG Wreaks Havoc in Toyland

Taking a cue from Jaws, Y&R New York sets the scene in this spot for the LG Kompressor Elite vacuum cleaner. Everything is all fine and dandy, as all the toys are enjoying a day at the carpet until a couple gets separated from the group. They start, well, having fun until (cue the score) things go to hell real quick when some uninvited guests show up for dinner.

The team at Psyop (with the help of Smuggler) built a set on a stage, keeping the CG to a minimum and shot all the plastic toy soldiers, Barbie look-a-likes, designer toys, stuffed animals, etc on that set and implemented CG to give the dolls different facial expressions. The sharks and other subtleties were obviously generated as well.

Psyop CEO and CD Marco Spier says in a statement, “We of course got personally connected with the toys, their characters and the story. Carefully placing them personally on set to get the best performance out of them, kind of like actors. We also liked the idea of having unusual combinations of different characters because that’s how kids play – free form, mixing and matching, and grouping things together based on what they have no hand, or what their siblings or friends have.”

We think it’s safe to say this turned out to be a nice spot with some good imagination – much better than an infomercial of a vacuum sucking up coins and marbles. Credits after the jump.

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