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Posts Tagged ‘Rob Sondik’

Jan is Preggers in New Toyota Mother’s Day Spots from Saatchi & Saatchi LA


Actress Laurel Coppock, who plays Jan the receptionist in Saatchi & Saatchi LA’s long-running campaign for Toyota, recently revealed that she’s pregnant. Instead of attempting to hide the expectant mother’s pregnancy or concocting some kind of weight-gain narrative, Saatchi & Saatchi LA embraces the change in their new Mother’s Day spots for the brand.

The new spots continue in the same vein as previous “Jan” commercials, this time with mothers seeking safe vehicles for their children. In one of the spots, a couple explain that they need a quiet ride because their baby is a light sleeper, only to wake him from their excitement over Toyota’s sales event. It’s the kind of safe, family-friendly approach you’d expect for Toyota, especially for Mother’s Day. Another spot, “Spelling Bee” features a family with a young Spelling Bee finalist, which plays out just as predictably. Stick around for credits and “Spelling Bee” after the jump. Read more

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Sprint Induces Seizures with ‘All Together Now’

Sure, this may not send people to the hospital like Kanye West‘s video for “All of the Lights.” But, if you’re hanging out on your office desktop, we recommend watching this new spot from Goodby, Silverstein & Partners on full-screen mode.

It seems that Sprint’s “Now Network” nickname is being dropped (at least in these spots) for “All. Together. Now.” A look at the campaign’s website reveals that Sprint’s Unlimited plan means a sad, blinking pug or a senior citizen smiling with floating balloons behind her. You can even call or text Veatrice to wish her a happy 100th birthday! While the site leans more toward the unlimited calling and texting aspects of the plan, TV spots like “Anthem” are more about viral video capabilities. Isn’t it time you used your HTC EVO to watch more people falling off of tables? Credits and the second spot, “Birthday,” after the jump.

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Goodby, Chevrolet Introduce Electric Car for ‘America, Man’

It’s been about a decade since Toyota launched their electric hybrid car, the Prius, worldwide. So, give Chevrolet credit for picking up on the idea and realizing that, “Hey, pretty much every other major car company has a hybrid electric vehicle. We should probably build one too.”

Enter the new Chevy Volt and its “Runs Deep” campaign done by the good folks at Goodby. Premiering during the World Series last night (Giants won FYI), the TV spot already has the audience Chevy needs to sell tons of earth-friendly cars stamped with an American seal of approval. The only problem is that ads like “Anthem” shown above might be too subtle for anyone to notice…at all. Unless, of course, you’re just a fan of Freelance Whales (and you should be).

Now, no one’s asking voiceover guy Tim Allen to overwhelm GM and Chevy with his trademark Home Improvement “man-grunt” noises. And, admittedly, the creatives as Goodby are much better at what they do than most, that being clean-cut simplicity. But, if you’re making a commercial about the “American Way” airing during “America’s Favorite Pastime,” why not use a bit more patriotic imagery? If your electric car is the kind that actually plugs into an outlet, why not show that onscreen for more than half a second so people can see what you’re doing? Also, if your car can run solely on an electric charge for 40 miles, more than 75 percent of the country’s daily commute, wouldn’t you include something about that other than some fine print at the bottom of your ad or mentioning “really far”? Maybe I just don’t understand why Chevy’s trying to sell spontaneity to the kind of people who are counted on to watch the World Series every year.

Credits after the jump. Read more