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Posts Tagged ‘Tim Stier’

DDB California, Kingsford Want You to ‘Get Off Your Gas’

With barbecue season right around the corner, DDB California has a new campaign for Kingsford Charcoal, complete with the new tagline, “Get Off Your Gas.”

In the 30-second broadcast spot, “The Social Grill,” DDB California pokes fun at the cultural obsession with social media. As attendees of a fun-looking  backyard barbecue look on, a man’s next door neighbor uses his “Social Grill,” a gas grill with social media capabilities. The man, grilling alone, takes a selfie and uses the grill’s speech activation and other goofy features, while the barbecue attendees simply relax and grill up some tasty grub. In addition to the TV spot, the campaign also features online videos and digital skins on About.com as well as Kingsford-owned social channels. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

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Here Are All the Black People

Here Are All the Black PeopleOn September 24, land your dream job in advertising and design at the premier multicultural career fair taking place at the Metropolitan Pavilion in NYC. Workshop your portfolio, attend mentoring sessions, learn from industry leaders, network with your peers, and most importantly, launch your career. Register now!

Microsoft Advertising, twofifteenmccann Talk to Unlikely Visionaries

Tapping into kids’ insight is no new tactic, but who can fault an agency for once again asking wide-eyed young “visionaries” to inspire the future? Kids are so charmingly stuttering, so clearly genuine, that they bring a persuasive power to any cause. San Francisco’s twofifteenmccann’s latest work for Microsoft Advertising is no exception.

The agency debuted this film at Cannes last week. Backed by uplifting piano notes, a handful of children talk about their visions for technological innovation, including smart refrigerators (“…Pizza! It’d be like, ‘whooosh!’”) and virtual dressing rooms (for ninja outfits in particular). As each child recounts their vision, an animated prototype of the technology floats next to them.

As hopeful as this ad is, there inevitably comes a point when kids stop thinking quite so big, and instead adopt trademark adult cynicism. Let’s hope Microsoft Advertising really can activate child-like wonder and imagination as they do their work. Many of these kids’ ideas are already on their way—what will they (adults and children) think of next?

Credits after the jump.

Read more