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Posts Tagged ‘Friendfeed’

Twitter Traffic Falls -2.43% For November. Facebook -0.47%, LinkedIn -6.93%, Friendfeed -20.95%

This is a monthly series that looks at visitor data for all the major social networks as calculated by Compete.com. Compete is USA-biased, and certainly in the case of Twitter the visitor numbers are distorted by the openness of Twitter’s API and the numerous Twitter software clients, but on a like-for-like basis the numerics have value and warrant investigation. Please refer to previous installments in this series for a more detailed overview.

Unique visitors to Twitter.com fell for the third successive month, dropping 2.43% overall, to 22,481,568, according to Compete.com. More concerning for the network was a -7.24% dip in overall visits.

Twitter Traffic Falls -2.43% For November. Facebook -0.47%, LinkedIn -6.93%, Friendfeed -20.95%

(click to enlarge)

Overall, traffic to all social media fell, with Facebook losing -0.47% to 128,339,156 unique visitors for November, but gaining 3.51% to 2,601,399,595 visitors overall.

Twitter Traffic Falls -2.43% For November. Facebook -0.47%, LinkedIn -6.93%, Friendfeed -20.95%

Friendfeed fell sharply, down 20.95% to just 552,147 uniques, and has now lost almost half of its unique visitors since peaking at 1,044,326 in August. Overall visitors fell 26.62%.

LinkedIn, which has been the social media star the past five or six months, fell for the first time since May, losing 6.93% of unique visitors, and 11.53% overall.

MySpace dipped -2.64%, and -3.08% overall.

Plurk, which was once considered a rival to Twitter, saw just over two hundred thousand unique visitors for the month, and surely will not last much into 2010.

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Social Media 201Starting October 13, Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 left off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

Twitter Is, Facebook Is, Friendfeed Is…

A little bit of fun for the weekend: the most popular search definitions for Twitter, Facebook and Friendfeed, according to Google (the top-ranking terms are highlighted in blue).

Twitter Is, Facebook Is, Friendfeed Is...

Twitter Is, Facebook Is, Friendfeed Is...

Twitter Is, Facebook Is, Friendfeed Is...

Feel free to try it yourself.

Twitter Shows 16% Growth In June; Friendfeed, Plurk Stumble, Facebook Closes In On Google

After showing only marginal growth in May, Twitter resumed its impressive upward run with a 16.57 per cent gain in unique visits for June to 22,997,148, and over 150 million visits overall (up 12.05 per cent).

Twitter Unique Visits

(click to enlarge)

Facebook was also solid, rising 8.45 per cent to 122,559,672 uniques, and +9.02 per cent in overall visits, which are now closing in on two billion. Indeed, Facebook’s growth rate is staggering – it’s rapidly gaining ground on Google.

Facebook, Google Unique Visits

Once-rival MySpace also grew, up 7.19 per cent to 60,973,908 uniques.

Friendfeed lost a little ground in uniques (-0.26 per cent), but dropped 20.26 per cent in overall visits.

Plurk lost 11.48 per cent of uniques and 12.68 per cent of overall visitors.

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Twitter, Friendfeed Growth Stalls For May; LinkedIn drops, Facebook Climbs 8.5%

It couldn’t last forever. According to website traffic tracker Compete.com, unique visitors to Twitter.com rose less than 1.5 per cent, from 19,443,286 to 19,728,619.

Twitter

(Click all charts to enlarge)

Facebook, meanwhile, gained over 8.5 per cent, boasting 113,014,638 visits in May, and further widened the gap over once-rival MySpace, which also saw minimal growth.

Facebook, MySpace

Indeed, Facebook was the only social networking platform that gained any considerable ground. Friendfeed was up marginally, Plurk dipped a little, and Linkedin dropped over 3 per cent.

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Anonymity On The Internet Needs To End

You’ve probably been following the drama that occurred between Mike Arrington of TechCrunch and Leo Laporte on an episode of The Gilmor Gang on Laporte’s TWiT.tv network.

Earlier today, Robert Scoble opened a discussion about this issue on Friendfeed. You can read it here – be warned, there are some 744 comments, and like any huge thread on Friendfeed, it’s a laborious process to follow.

This is the incident in a nutshell. Laporte had a new Palm Pre on his show, and Arrington asked if he paid for it. Leo replied that he did not and that it was a ‘one-week review unit’, which means that after seven days you’re meant to return it. Laporte then, rightly or wrongly, assumed Arrington was implying that his opinion on the Pre was compromised, and went ballistic.

Thanks to this very popular YouTube snippet of the incident, it was quickly all over the internet and large conversations began to take place on Friendfeed, Twitter, Laporte’s IRC chat room, and Techcrunch itself.

The latter was where most of the damage was done – many commentators, mostly anonymous, chose to attack Arrington repeatedly, and many threats and allegations were made. Arrington has heavily edited his ‘Ouch’ post on several occasions, but still intact is his reference to an incident that occurred at a conference in Munich earlier this year, where somebody walked up to him and deliberately spat in his face. After the spat with Laporte, who has a very strong following, Arrington was the recipient of a lot of negative and overly hostile comments on his blog and around the internet. (He mentioned at one point that TechCrunch deleted over 600 of these comments).

Here’s the thing: Arrington and Laporte are both well-seasoned pros and should have known better. I think they share equal blame for their behaviour on the show, and it’s to their credit that they’ve mostly resolved their differences (although Arrington has done a few strange things in the aftermath, such as deleting TechCrunch’s Friendfeed account, which has subsequently been recreated in an unofficial capacity.)

The problem here isn’t these guys – it’s the reaction. And it isn’t that the public doesn’t have a right to respond and comment on issues like this. That’s unavoidable, and if you’re a public figure, which Arrington is, certainly in the tech world, then you have to expect the good with the bad. If you do something that makes people unhappy, then expect to be called out on it. I don’t think Mike would assume otherwise.

The problem lies with anonymous feedback. Anybody can be a big hero and call somebody else a POS when they’re hiding behind a proxy and an alias. What does that prove? What does that mean? Nothing.

Dickwad Theory

I’m all for having a strong opinion, and voicing it. As long as they’re not defamatory or outright lies, I’m 100 per cent behind freedom of speech when it comes to those opinions. But if you have something to say, then you need to stand up and be counted. You need to accept that for your comment to matter – for it to mean something – it needs to be backed up with a verifiable account. We need to know it is you making that statement.

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Have We Connected?

Twittercism is only a few months old but has already built a strong number of subscribers and regular visitors, with folks taking advantage of the different ways to read the content of this blog, via RSS reader, email, the Kindle, and of course the website itself.

A lot of my readers have come to this website thanks to my presence on Twitter, where through the @Sheamus account I share a lot of great content from my travels around the internet.

Others have arrived at Twittercism from social media bookmarking portals, such as Digg, Reddit and Stumbleupon, thanks to the kindness of those who have been generous enough to submit my articles to these sites.

And I’ve been fortunate enough to be mentioned and quoted on many great sites such as Mashable, ReadWriteWeb, ZDNet and Techmeme.

This is all fantastic, but because of the different paths that lead everybody to this site, there’s an element of disparity about these connections. This is the time to rectify that!

Connections

The key word in social networking is, of course, social. Here are the ways we can socialise!

Twitter

As mentioned, you can follow me on Twitter by hooking up with @Sheamus (http://twitter.com/Sheamus). That’s me. :)

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In Defense Of The Re-Tweet

There’s been some talk of late in blogs and on Friendfeed that the humble re-tweet might be, in fact, at best stupid, worse, a nuisance. As Louis Gray writes in his piece:

“Twitter is a land where 140 characters is all you’ve got to express yourself. If you think you don’t have enough interesting data to share 140 characters of your own, but instead need to piggyback on someone else’s tweet, then maybe you should rethink why you’re using the service.”

Louis earlier suggested that begging for re-tweets is lazy; that repeating what somebody else has said doesn’t add anything to the conversation.

He isn’t alone; Dave Winer and others this week have been beating the re-tweet into submission, suggesting that what Twitter needs is the ‘like’ service that other social networks use (Friendfeed, Digg, Reddit etc).

While I agree that there are right and wrong ways to re-tweet submissions – or, indeed, to ask for them to be re-submitted from your followers – I think completely dismissing the re-tweet is misguided. It serves a purpose on Twitter that makes it unique to that platform.

The Re-Tweet

The Re-Tweet Gives Credit

However you choose to re-submit a tweet – using RT, re-tweet or via (I will address the differences later) – it’s important that credit is given to the original poster. The re-tweet does this effectively and with a minimal waste of characters.

Additionally, the re-tweet is (or should/can be) an endorsement of the person, too. When I re-tweet somebody I’m fairly mindful about whom it is I’m re-tweeting. Even the most obnoxious ass is capable of at least one good tweet, much like every amateur is capable of one pro golf shot. It doesn’t mean the rest was up to par. I take that into consideration when I RT; I’m saying to you, this content is good, and this is a good guy.

Because you give credit, the original poster has an excellent chance of picking up some new followers and meeting some new folk. And vice versa.

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