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Posts Tagged ‘Journalists’

Journalists: Save $50 On Our Next Boot Camp, And Learn When To Use Twitter In Your Reporting

Mediabistro is offering readers of AllTwitter a $50 discount on our brand-new course, Journalism and Technology Boot Camp. In this 8 week course, you’ll learn (among other things) how and when to use Twitter in your research, reporting and promotion as a journalist in the digital era.
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71% of Irish Media Use Twitter as News Source

A recent poll suggests that the Irish media is having a love-affair with Twitter – 71 of 100 Irish journalists polled say they use Twitter as a news source or supporting material for articles they write.
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Why Twitter is Better for Journalists than Facebook

Last week, Facebook launched the “Journalists on Facebook” page to entice journalists to “reach their audience directly” and access over 500 million users. Despite the over 35,000 people who have “liked” the page, Twitter is still the superior vehicle for news gathering and article promotion – and it will always be, if the core of both networks remains the same.
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Texas Governor Rick Perry Blocks Media from his Twitter Account, Twitter Reacts

In a move that runs counter to the open nature of Twitter, Texas Governor Rick Perry has blocked several members of the Texas media from accessing his Twitter account.
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Twitter Scores During Super Bowl XLV

Last year, between 40 and 50 percent of all tweets during the height of the Super Bowl were related to the game. And this year Twitter will capitalize on this huge fan base by offering Super Bowl fans a new way to join in on the game-day excitement. Partnering with the Super Bowl and Visa, Twitter is creating an all-in-one location for the best of Super Bowl tweets from the fans, the players, the coaches and the commentators. So take off those foam fingers from time-to-time and get tweeting.
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6 Key Sports Journalists to Follow on Twitter for Breaking News

When it comes to an injury, trade, or scandal, sports stories can easily be broken in 140 characters or less. Most reporters head to twitter first where they can divulge the information before going through an editor to post on the web.

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Twitter Spreads the Word About New Journalistic Web Tool on New York Times

Twitter is a fantastic tool for journalists, as an exchange earlier this week proved. The New York Times quietly unveiled a new way to hyperlink to content – that, incidentally, could prove to streamline journalistic standards on the web – and it was first noted, and named, on Twitter.

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What Price A Truly Social Media?

Currently we are privy to a large amount of speculation about the future of the newspaper industry. Some pundits (and editors) are suggesting the only way that print can survive in anything like its existing format is to start charging for online content. Advertising, they say, as a consistent form of revenue, is not enough. This perception would seem timely; News Corp just announced a 97 per cent slump in profits in its newspaper division.

Others feel that charging for what has, with one notable exception, always been free content would actually have the opposite effect for the industry, and likely expedite its demise. The Guardian is currently running a poll asking their readers if they would pay to read newspapers online (any newspapers – not just The Guardian). At the time of writing, a commanding 87.4% say they would not.

In September 2005, The New York Times premiered its TimesSelect subscription model for part of its online content. The service was priced at $7.95 per month, or $49.95 per annum (while being free to existing print subscribers and students), and was a resounding failure. People hated it. Others subscribed, took the content, and then made it freely available to all. So is the way of the internet. Two years later, the Times announced it would stop charging for access.

I have to admit, I side with the majority on this issue. Unless it is priced at an absolute pittance – and I mean literally pennies a day – paying for newspaper content as is is not something I can see myself doing. Others, it appears, would agree.

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