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Posts Tagged ‘online privacy’

How Burglars Are Using Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

With the rise of social media, burglars have easier access to specific information regarding homeowners than ever before.

More than 75% of burglars reportedly use Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare to target potential properties. But that doesn’t mean you can’t protect yourself.

The following infographic, issued by the UK’s Distinctive Doors, takes a look at all the ways burglars utilize social media, and therefore what you should be doing to secure your property.

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Internal Documents Reveal The FBI Can Read Your Twitter DMs Without A Warrant

The White House just hired its first Chief Privacy Officer – straight out of Twitter, no less – but the privacy they may be protecting is that of the FBI, not the American people.

According to new internal documents, obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) through a Freedom of Information Act request, the content of your emails, Facebook chats, Twitter DMs and all other forms of digital communication chould be at the disposal of law enforcement agencies, even without a warrant.

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Easy New Year’s Resolution: Clean Up Your App Permissions With One Handy App

The New Year is a great time to take stock of your Twitter account, making sure your bio is optimized, your avatar is a good reflection of you and the list of who you follow is honed.

One easy first Twitter New Year’s Resolution is to clean up your Twitter permissions – in fact, all your social media permissions – with an all-in-one app called MyPermissions.

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Twitter, LinkedIn, Google, Apple – A Year Of Online Security Breaches [INFOGRAPHIC]

Did you know that while three in five U.S. adults have said that they feel vulnerable to being hacked online, 69 percent of these same people reuse their password on more than one site?

Furthermore, 72 percent have said that they are concerned about their online data being used without their knowledge, but more than one-third (36 percent) store their personal information, such as credit card data, on certain websites for convenience.

You do the math.

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Are You Safe Online? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Did you know that the total size of the internet population has almost doubled in the past five years, from 1.319 billion in 2007 to 2.26 billion today?

This staggering rise in usage has had an exponential effect on everything we do online, including Google searches, emails sent, Facebook status updates, daily tweets and mobile data. And, over this same period, our willingness to share so much about ourselves on and in these platforms has also increased the risk of using them – the number of new unique threats per day has risen from 57 in 2008 to an eyebrow-raising 6,300 this year.

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Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest – Are You Sharing Too Much Online? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Are you sharing too much online?

Social media has empowered users to connect with friends and family, demand better products and customer service from brands and change the world, but as we become more comfortable with these tools we are exponentially relaxing any initial concerns we might have had with security.

Namely, as platforms such as Twitter and Facebook become an everyday part of our lives, sharing otherwise private information about ourselves to these channels becomes the norm which, in some cases, can be hazardous.

It pays to remember that with social media you’re always on camera, and anything you say or do can – and, unfortunately, often will – be used against you.

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What Do Twitter, Facebook, Google And Pinterest Know About YOU? [INFOGRAPHIC]

In case you haven’t heard, people love the internet.

And they really love social media.

Collectively, hundreds of millions of users generate billions of pieces of content each and every day on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Google and Pinterest.

So, here’s the big question… what do these social networks know about you?

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Politicians’ Deleted Tweets Are No Longer Safe Thanks To Politwoops

The Internet was never a private place, particularly not for politicians – but now they can’t even delete their tweets. It’s kind of sad really and one could feel bad for them, if this whole thing didn’t promise to be entirely hilarious.

Sure, anyone can delete a tweet, it’s not like politicians’ delete key won’t work anymore. And yes, anyone who moves fast enough can grab a screenshot before they get the tweet deleted – that’s nothing new. But the folks at Sunlight Foundation just created a handy little script that grabs only those tweets that politicians delete – and posts them. Tee hee.
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With Social Media, You’re Always On Camera

Social media is the virtual Big Brother. You get involved, you get comfortable, you get complacent, and suddenly you forget that you’re on camera 24/7, 365 days a year.

It’s very easy to make a mistake. We all do it. Everybody slips up from time to time.

Solution: be smart about who you invite into your online communities. If you’re mixing business (employer, associates, clients) with pleasure (friends, family, relationships) on the same network it’s disturbingly easy for something to go wrong. And even if you’re the very epitome of decorum, somebody else can very easily ruin things for you. This doesn’t have to be intentionally malicious – an innocent act like sharing a photograph where you perhaps don’t come off particularly well can do major damage to your status and reputation.

(This is particularly true on Facebook. Pay careful attention to your privacy settings.)

Twitter is an open network, and as such it doesn’t lend itself to being overly personal or bold. Be yourself, but be the best version of who that is. With more and more employers using social media to research job candidates, you cannot afford to be casual. Doing something stupid on the internet isn’t just for Christmas: it’s for life.

I’m not a fan of online anonymity, particularly in the comment sections of websites. But if you’re concerned about the implications of your personal life impacting on your professional it might be the right thing to do. You may also wish to consider protecting your updates on Twitter.

(It’s worth noting that both of these measures will likely have a negative impact on your potential to do business within social media.)

Let me be clear: it’s absolutely fine to friend your boss. Broadening your relationship beyond the limitations of the office can actually enhance your career. Enjoy the company of your colleagues? Want to impress your clients? Go ahead and friend them online.

But here’s the thing: you can never, ever forget that you’re being watched. All of the time.