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Posts Tagged ‘social media policy’

70% Of Brands Response To Customer Complaints On Social Media Within 24 Hours [STUDY]

70% Of Brands Response To Customer Complaints On Social Media Within 24 Hours [STUDY]

As a brand using social media, how quickly do you respond to consumer complaints?

If your average response is an hour or less – and it pays to be honest here – you’re in pretty lofty company, as fewer than one in five (18 percent) of brands reply to customer complaints on channels such as Twitter and Facebook within 60 minutes, with 21 percent rarely or never responding at all.

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Just 45% Of Brands Have Policy For Dealing With Customer Complaints On Social Media [STUDY]

Just 45% Of Brands Have Policy For Dealing With Customer Complaints On Social Media [STUDY]

Less than half of brands have effective policy in place for dealing with negative posts on their social media channels, reveals a new study from Social Media Marketing University (SMMU).

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Can You Use Twitter At Work? Social Media And The Workplace [STUDY]

Does your business have a social media policy? While it’s certainly true that platforms such as Twitter and Facebook have become an integral part of the marketing campaigns for many brands, it seems like every other week we read about some publicity disaster because a disgruntled employee, PR firm or naïve CEO tweets something offensive or plain stupid from a corporate account.

This infographic from Mindflash looks at how companies are policing social media in the workplace.

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Your Company Doesn’t Need A Social Media Rulebook (Just Some Common Sense)

The New York Times has impressed me not once, but twice this week.

First, they’ve decided to experiment with turning off their automated (and very robotic) @nytimes Twitter feed in favour of having the updates managed by (gasp) real people. Which means (as you can see here) actual engagement.

(Although, being frank, it’s pretty fleeting at the moment. But still, they’re trying.)

Second, Liz Heron, The New York Times social media editor (and one of the scribes behind the new-and-human @nytimes account) spoke at the BBC’s Social Media Summit earlier this week and revealed that the Times has a satisfyingly laid-back approach to the management of their social media program, too.

“We don’t really have any social media guidelines. We basically just tell people to use common sense and don’t be stupid.”

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