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Posts Tagged ‘social media politics’

#DearCongress Trends As Americans Weigh In On The Government Shutdown

#DearCongress Trends As Americans Weigh In On The Government Shutdown

After Congress failed to reach a resolution on a short-term funding measure, the U.S. federal government officially shut down Tuesday morning.

Evidence of how frustrated the American public is with Congress for failing to reach a compromise is rampant on Twitter.

To get a gauge of sentiment on social media surrounding the government shutdown, the TODAY show and Carson Daly asked the public to share their messages for Congress using the hashtag #dearcongress.

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Social Media 201

Social Media 201Starting October 13, Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 left off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

How Is Social Media Being Used By The Government? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Back on April 20, 2007, then U.S. Senator Barack Obama sent his first-ever tweet. A little over six months later, he was elected president.

Of course, it took a little more work than that simple (and, with hindsight, somewhat cock-eyed) tweet, but Obama’s savvy use of social networks to spur interest in his run for the U.S. presidency was absolutely a pivotal part of his campaign, and in the last five years social media has become a key component of the political messaging system, playing an important role in everything from defusing riots, forecasting elections and emergency response.

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Obama Vs Romney: Who Is The Real Commander In Tweet? [INFOGRAPHIC]

We’re just a few short weeks away from the 2012 U.S. Presidential Election, and suddenly it’s all getting very serious indeed.

On Wednesday (Oct. 3), President Barack Obama debated with Republican nominee Mitt Romney at the University of Denver, trading barbed remarks and facts (or “facts”, as some pundits have suggested of Romney) in a heated contest that could decide the next occupant of the Oval Office. But who won? How did Twitter react? What’s the word from the peanut gallery?

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Obama Vs Romney – A Social Slugfest [INFOGRAPHIC]

We’re just a few weeks away from the 2012 U.S. presidential elections, and social media has played an enormously important role in what is arguably the first time a digital election strategy has been employed by both candidates.

Did you know that, on average, President Barack Obama’s Twitter followers grow three times faster than his Facebook fans? Or that Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s engagement rate is eighteen times higher on Facebook than on Twitter?

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Democrats Think Social Media More Important For Politics Than Republicans, Independents [STUDY]

Social media is expected to play a significant role in November’s U.S. presidential election,  and a new study from Pew Internet has revealed the extent to which politically-minded users are engaged with channels such as Twitter and Facebook, and how importantly they rate them.

Pew have documented their findings in their Politics On Social Networking Sites report, which was published earlier today.

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What Is The Most Political Social Network? [STUDY]

Yesterday we took a close look at Social Networking Sites And Our Lives, the latest research from Pew Internet, with articles about the educational level and usage frequency of members of the major social networks.

Let me ask you a question: what is the most political social network? It’s Twitter, right? I mean, with the way that platform has interjected itself into the mainstream press and public consciousness around the world, becoming a de facto instrument in political revolution, with citizens from all corners of the planet making themselves heard, it simply has to be, right?

Right?

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