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Posts Tagged ‘Twitter behaviour’

The Tech Industry’s Most Obnoxious Tweeters [INFOGRAPHIC]

Moment of truth: are you an obnoxious tweeter?

Israel-based company Conduit created an infographic that examines 11 of the tech industry’s most annoying Twitter users.

Check it out below to self-diagnose, or point a virtual finger at an obnoxious feed-clogger you’ve unfollowed:

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Why Consistency Is The Key To Success On Twitter

One of the most important habits everybody using Twitter needs to adopt as early as possible is the habit of consistency.

This is true for personal accounts and brands, and it comes in two flavours – consistency in the things that you say, and consistency in how often you say them.

In other words: who you are, and what (and how often) you tweet about it, should be a constant.

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That’s Not Very Spiritual! Deepak Chopra Tells Twitter Critic To ‘Shut Up’

Deepak Chopra is, according to his official website, the author of more than sixty books translated into over eighty-five languages, fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Adjunct Professor of Executive Programs at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, and Senior Scientist with The Gallup Organization.

Time magazine credits Chopra as “the poet-prophet of alternative medicine”. Chopra typically writes on subjects such as the mind-body connection and spirituality, and recommends ridding oneself of negative emotions to improve health and wellbeing.

It was somewhat surprising, then, when he responded to some criticism on Twitter by publicly telling the person involved to ‘shut up’.

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Do You Know, Or Do You 'No'?

Nobody can tell you what to do. And for the record: that includes me.

My article yesterday triggered a lot of reaction. Mostly positive, but some people were upset and others reacted in a hostile manner.

The thing is, I’m not telling you what to do – I’m trying to help you not do the wrong things.

And yes: ‘wrong things’ is a relative term. And you may not care whether what your followers think about you on Twitter (several readers made that very clear). But for some people this stuff does matter (brands in particular), and they’re hurting themselves, and their prospects, when their behaviour isn’t optimal. Or at least consistent.

In all aspects of life there are better ways to perform specific functions. And there is nearly always a certain type of style or attitude that is more beneficial than another – or in some cases, everything else. It can never hurt to know these things. The information alone has tremendous value, as it then empowers you to make a decision. It’s fine if you decide you still don’t care, but there’s an important distinction between not caring and knowing, and not caring and being blissfully unaware.

On Twitter, Be Nice. Until It’s Time To Not Be Nice

For the most part, Twitter is a friendly place. There’s something about the connecting process between two strangers on a social network that encourages both of them to act in a polite and civil manner.

(As an aside, this can often contrast quite sharply with how our so-called real friends behave.)

However, from time-to-time, often regardless of how well you conduct yourself, things are going to get ugly. Indeed, it’s fair to say that the better you get at doing it right, the more likely it is that you’ll start to develop a sub-following of critics and haters, all of whom will gladly go out of their way to tell you that you’re actually doing it wrong. At least, in their opinion.

For you, this is actually a positive. It means you matter. As Colin Powell once said:

“Good leadership involves responsibility to the welfare of the group, which means that some people will get angry at your actions and decisions. It’s inevitable if you’re honourable. Trying to get everyone to like you is a sign of mediocrity. You’ll avoid the tough decisions, you’ll avoid confronting the people who need to be confronted, and you’ll avoid offering differential rewards based on differential performance because some people might get upset.”

While it’s often true that haters are actually some of your biggest fans in disguise, a growing number of them will be unpleasant, often seemingly bitter people, arguing endlessly and clearly for the sake of it. It’s a trap, and no matter how hard you try, sometimes you’re going to get caught.

It’s these folks I want to address in this article, and in doing so I’d like to pay homage to the words of the great philosopher James Dalton, whose guidance seems very appropriate here.

When push comes to shove, you'll need to ask yourself - what would Dalton do?

When push comes to shove, you’ll need to ask yourself – what would Dalton do?

All you have to do is follow three simple rules. Read more