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Posts Tagged ‘twitter url shortener’

Twitter Launches Internal URL Shortener, Throws Bit.ly A Bone

From the official blog:

Since early March, we have been routing links within Direct Messages through our link service to detect, intercept, and prevent the spread of malware, phishing, and other dangers. Any link shared in a Direct Message has been wrapped with a twt.tl URL. Links reported to us as malicious are blacklisted, and we present users with a page that warns them of potentially malicious content if they click blacklisted links. We want users to have this benefit on all tweets.

When this is rolled out more broadly to users this summer, all links shared on Twitter.com or third-party apps will be wrapped with a t.co URL. A really long link such as http://www.amazon.com/Delivering-Happiness-Profits-Passion-Purpose/dp/0446563048 might be wrapped as http://t.co/DRo0trj for display on SMS, but it could be displayed to web or application users as amazon.com/Delivering- or as the whole URL or page title. Ultimately, we want to display links in a way that removes the obscurity of shortened link and lets you know where a link will take you.

In addition to a better user experience and increased safety, routing links through this service will eventually contribute to the metrics behind our Promoted Tweets platform and provide an important quality signal for our Resonance algorithm–the way we determine if a Tweet is relevant and interesting to users. We are also looking to provide services that make use of this data, an example would be analytics within our eventual commercial accounts service.

Already using your own URL shortener for analytics? Don’t worry – they’ve got that covered.

If you are already partial to a particular shortener when you tweet, you can continue to use it for link shortening and analytics as you normally would, and we’ll wrap the shortened links you submit.

Sounds sensible. And the wrapping means that reports of bit.ly’s demise might have been greatly exaggerated. Which is good news for me, as my tailored URL shortener is ticking along nicely.

(Source: Twitter blog.)

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Twitter Tried (And Failed) To Buy Bit.ly (Who Had Already Turned Down Google)

Interesting report over at Business Insider that details a failed attempt by Twitter to buy bit.ly in January.

Why? Price, of course. Bit.ly’s was too high for Twitter. One source tells us Bit.ly’s asking price was under $100 million, but still a “big f—ing number.”

Twitter and Bit.ly were far apart on price in part because the people running Bit.ly view it as a service that extends beyond Twitter. One source close to Bit.ly tells us that of the 3.5 billion clicks on Bit.ly links in March, 100 million went to Facebook.com. This source tells us that only 30% to 40% of Bit.ly’s traffic is Twitter related.

Another reason Bit.ly probably felt like it could demand a high asking price is that four months prior to its talks with Twitter, it turned down an acquisition offer from Google.

Read more.

Bit.ly remains the network’s default shortened URL, but now Twitter has bought its own URL shortener, acquired Tweetie and made an official Blackberry app, turning down this acquisition might prove to be incredibly short-sighted.

I’m a huge fan of bit.ly, and would hate to see them disappear into the ether. But given that Twitter’s own shortener will inevitably have access to all the internal goodness (most of which one assumes Twitter keeps under wraps), it doesn’t look all that promising.