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Posts Tagged ‘world cup social media’

Results, Goals And Player Performance Top #WorldCup Topics For Social Networkers [STUDY]

Results, Goals And Player Performance Top #WorldCup Topics For Social Networkers [STUDY]

73 percent of social networkers are posting comments to platforms such as Twitter and Facebook when a goal is scored during the World Cup, reveals a new study from GlobalWebIndex.

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WhatsApp More Popular Than Twitter, Google+ And Instagram For World Cup Chatter In Brazil [STUDY]

WhatsApp More Popular Than Twitter, Google+ And Instagram For World Cup Chatter In Brazil [STUDY]

94 percent of social networkers in the U.S., United Kingdom and Brazil are using Facebook whilst watching matches during the 2014 World Cup, compared to 59 percent who are using Twitter, reports GlobalWebIndex.

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More Women Than Men Are Using Social Media To Follow The World Cup (In Germany) [STUDY]

More Women Than Men Are Using Social Media To Follow The World Cup (In Germany) [STUDY]

Brazil 2014 is, without a doubt, the first truly social world cup, with study after study underlining the massive reaction to the tournament on platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.

Historically, football has received its most passionate following from men, but in Germany it’s women who are reaching for social media to following news and matches from the World Cup, according to new data from Tomorrow Focus Media.

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One In Three Are Using Social Media To Comment Live During The World Cup [STUDY]

One In Three Are Using Social Media To Comment Live During The World Cup [STUDY]

Brazil 2014 is the first truly social World Cup – while social media played an important role in football’s biggest occasion four years ago, platforms such as Facebook and Twitter were significantly smaller. Subsequently, the reaction online was relatively slight.

Four years is a long now. Now, 50 percent of users watching World Cup games say that they’re checking social networks to see what other people are saying, and one in three are commenting themselves, live, on social media.

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For Smartphone Users, Facebook Beats Twitter For World Cup Social Chatter [STUDY]

For Smartphone Users, Facebook Beats Twitter For World Cup Social Chatter [STUDY]

28 percent of smartphone users plan to use Twitter to discuss the 2014 World Cup simultaneously whilst watching live games, reveals new data from Peel.

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World Cup Marketing – Social Media, Facts & Statistics [INFOGRAPHIC]

World Cup Marketing - Social Media, Facts & Statistics [INFOGRAPHIC]

Did you know that 3.6 billion people are expected to watch the 2014 World Cup, and that $5.7 billion will be spent on sponsorships and ads?

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Six In 10 World Cup Fans Have A Twitter Account [STUDY]

Six In 10 World Cup Fans Have A Twitter Account [STUDY]

Last week we looked at data that revealed that 55 percent of top World Cup fans – that is, those who plan to watch as many live matches during the tournament as possible – follow brands on social media.

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World Cup Brazil 2014 – The Most Social Sporting Event In History [INFOGRAPHIC]

World Cup Brazil 2014 - The Most Social Sporting Event In History [INFOGRAPHIC]

The 2014 FIFA World Cup kicks off today in Brazil, and it’s all set to be the biggest, most-talked about social sporting event in history.

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Why Brazil 2014 Will Be The First Truly Social World Cup [INFOGRAPHIC]

Why Brazil 2014 Will Be The First Truly Social World Cup [INFOGRAPHIC]

The World Cup finals in Brazil are two months away and while social media played an important role in football’s biggest occasion four years ago, platforms such as Facebook and Twitter were significantly smaller. Subsequently, the reaction online was relatively slight.

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