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Wires

AP Makes Changes Within Its Video Leadership

Vaughn Morrison

Vaughn Morrison

Denise Vance

Denise Vance

The Associated Press today announced several changes within its video leadership. Denise Vance, deputy director of U.S. video, will be head of U.S. video and radio, and Vaughn Morrison, a former CNN and Fox executive, was named earlier this month head of U.S. video production. Both are based in DC.

The announcement also named Derl McCrudden, previously head of video newsgathering, head of international video news for The Associated Press. He is based in London.

Debora Gorbutt, head of video content development, will now have a hand in the AP Middle East Extra, a new video service offering video content centered on news most relevant to the region.

For the full announcement, click here.

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40 McClatchy Tribune Information Services Positions to be Cut

layoffsAs many as 40 McClatchy Tribune Information Services (MCT) employees will lose their jobs as Tribune Publishing takes over the second largest supplemental photo wire in the U.S.

“A portion of the jobs based in Washington will be part of the ongoing wire service or remain with the bureau,” said McClatchy vice president for news and Washington editor Anders Gyllenhaal in the memo posted to Poynter. “But a majority of the Washington positions will be phased out over the course of the summer as the move to Chicago is complete.”

A source among the 40 being laid off said that two positions – an IT professional and a visual editor – are among those being filled in the McClatchy Washington bureau, which will remain in place but with photo content instead coming from the Tribune Content Agency. Since pursuing this story, we’ve received a position description for Visual Editor. A request for confirmation to McClatchy’s Washington bureau chief regarding positions being filled has yet to be answered.

We’re told the layoffs will be phased in over the coming weeks with the first group’s last day being May 28, and second group departing July 3. A third and final group’s last day is slated for August 1.

While many are likely on the brink of unemployment, we hear from our source that morale is still high, and that employees are still doing everything they can do “because they love doing it.”

3:00pm Update: McClatchy Washington bureau management confirmed that a total of four positions are currently being filled in the bureau - two positions as part of the digital team, an IT professional, and a visual editor. A clarification has also been made that McClatchy Washington bureau photo content will now be provided by Tribune Content Agency, rather than no longer from MCT.

AP Expands Washington, US, and International Investigative Reporting

ap_logoThe Associated Press announced today an expansion and reorganization of its Washington, US, and international investigative reporting efforts.

Their revamped mission will be “to develop investigations around breaking news events across the globe and produce exclusive reports that expose wrongdoing and illuminate social issues,” according to the announcement. The wire service also said that they plan to share some of the data from their investigative reporting with member news orgs to help them produce their own local content.

Joining the Washington team will be Ronnie Greene, currently a senior reporter at The Center for Public Integrity, and Jeff Horwitz, who’s on a Knight-Bagehot fellowship at Columbia University.

US investigations will focus on state and local data-driven projects with AP journos  David B. Caruso, Michael Kunzelman, Garance Burke and Holbrooke Mohr joining the team.

And International investigations will be led by Washington-based editor Trish Wilson with a team including Frank Bajak, based in Lima, Peru; Erika Kinetz in Shanghai; Richard Lardner in Washington; and Raphael Satter in London.

Bloomberg News Announces Promotions in DC Bureau

Bloomberg News Editor-in-Chief Matthew Winkler and Senior Executive Editor Laurie Hays announced this week a series of promotions to lead its Washington bureau.

Winnie O’Kelley was named executive editor for all U.S. government, legal and regulatory stories, Craig Gordon will be managing editor for Washington news and Jonathan Allen was named Washington bureau chief. In addition, Michael Shepard and Nicholas Johnston were named new deputy managing editors, and will work together with current Deputy Managing Editor Jeanne Cummings to run the coverage.

Allen and Gordon both came to Bloomberg from Politico -Allen was Washington Bureau Chief and Gordon was Managing Editor, while O’Kelley joined Bloomberg from NYT last year.

AP Taps David Scott As Political Editor

The AP announced today that David Scott, a long time Regional Editor, has been named Political Editor for the news agency. Scott had been based in Chicago overseeing the AP’s Central Region. He will move to Washington to take over his new duties and report to Washington Bureau Chief Sally Buzbee.

“The political editor job is a critical one for AP — directing our national political coverage, advising states on political reporting and working with colleagues on our race-calling, accountability, vote count and polling operations,” Buzbee said. “It requires superb news skills, keen interest in both politics and policy, and strong competitive instincts. We are thrilled David is taking it on.”

Scott joined the AP in 1999 as a staff reporter before being elevated to North Carolina News Editor in 2005. He has been a Regional Editor since 2009.

And the Pulitzers Go To…

A complete list of all the 2014 Pulitzer Awards for Journalism announced today:

Public Service
The Guardian US
-for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.
The Washington Post -for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.

Breaking News Reporting
Staff of The Boston Globe -for its exhaustive and empathetic coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings and the ensuing manhunt that enveloped the city, using photography and a range of digital tools to capture the full impact of the tragedy.

Investigative Reporting
Chris Hamby of The Center for Public Integrity, Washington, DC -for his reports on how some lawyers and doctors rigged a system to deny benefits to coal miners stricken with black lung disease, resulting in remedial legislative efforts.

Read more

AP Reporter Wins Michael Kelly Award

Rukmini Callimachi is this year’s recipient of the Michael Kelly Award for her work as the West Africa bureau chief for the Associated Press, Atlantic Media announced yesterday. The award is given each year by Atlantic Media to a reporter who “exemplifies the fearless pursuit and expression of truth,” and is named after the former editor of The Atlantic and National Journal who was killed while reporting in Iraq in 2003. Callimachi was honored at a dinner last night in Washington hosted by Atlantic Media CEO David Bradley.

 

To read more about the award and about Callimachi’s work, go here.

AFP Moves MacMillan from DC to Tehran

Arthur MacMillan, senior news editor in Washington at Agence France-Presse, has been appointed Tehran Deputy Bureau Chief, and will take up his new post next month. Arthur previously served as a correspondent in Baghdad and as an Asia editor for AFP based in Hong Kong. He is on Twitter @arthurmacmillan and moves to Iran after nearly three years in the United States.

Good luck on the new gig, Arthur!

UPI Sues Greek Websites Over Domain Names

United Press International has sued a couple of Greek websites in federal court—UPIPhoto.org and UPIPhoto.com—for cybersquatting and trademark infringement.

UPIPhoto.com is actually the website for an organization that calls itself United Photographers International and it’s just what it sounds like, a group of international photographers sharing their photos. It’s been active for years. UPI owns the domain UPIPhotos.com, with an added ‘s’ and they say the likelihood of confusion is too great. UPIPhoto.org is unused at the moment.

UPI has sued the websites, not the owner of the websites, because the news organization says it can’t find an actual person to sue. They claim the domain registrations list fictitious organization names that don’t correspond to any legal entities or persons. Well, they probably should’ve looked a little closer, because United Photographers International’s chairman is listed on its websites, in numerous calls for entries in internationally regarded photo competitions and he’s also listed as the domain’s administrative and technical contact. The website also lists a board of governors and the names of the organization’s co-founders. At least one of these people presumably has control of the domain, right?

What UPI probably should’ve said in its suit, if it wanted to be honest, is that it’s just easier and less costly to sue a website in rem, the legal term for filing suit against a piece of property, than it is to serve and obtain jurisdiction over the foreign people in control of that website. But the idea that they couldn’t find an actual person to sue just doesn’t stand up.

And while they claim that UPIPhoto.com is obviously trying to trade in bad faith on the good will of UPI’s name, United Photographers International actually has… Read more

Attribution Problem: AP Swipes Story From The Hill

It takes a certain amount of clumsiness to break something that’s already broken.

The Hill‘s Alexandra Jaffe broke the news yesterday that Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) was distancing himself from remarks made by Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. “As someone who grew up in tough circumstances, I know that being on public assistance is not a spot that anyone wants to be in,” Brown told The Hill. He was referring to Romney’s recently surfaced comments that labeled “47 percent” of Americans as people who feel “entitled” to government benefits.

Jaffe’s story was picked up by HuffPost, Political Wire and Politico, all of which attributed The Hill for breaking it.

The AP also picked it up.

Shortly after Jaffe’s story broke, AP reporter Steve LeBlanc wrote the same story, correctly paraphrasing Brown’s quotes. What was missing, however, was any attribution to The Hill.

LeBlanc’s story was updated later with actual quotes from Brown, the same quotes from Jaffe’s story. But LeBlanc’s article attributed them to a statement from Brown’s office. The first version of his story did not attribute to any statement.

Pictured is a screen capture of LeBlanc’s original story.

The Boston Herald‘s Hillary Chabot wrote the same story, attributing the same quotes to a statement. NYT did the same.

We requested comment from the AP media relations, LeBlanc and Chabot. A publicist is looking into it.

We’ve also sought comment from Brown’s campaign office to clarify if they sent out a statement with the same quotes after The Hill‘s story was published. But even if that is the case, the paraphrased version of LeBlanc’s story still did not cite The Hill for breaking the news.

UPDATE: AP’s Paul Colford explains…

Read more

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