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Posts Tagged ‘Al Gore’

Who Is This 40 year old?

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Morning Reading List, 09.19.08

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Good morning Washington.

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We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 07.18.08

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Good morning Washington. Above, Luke Russert and James Carville spearhead XM radio’s coverage of the MLB All-Star Game.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 11.14.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You find NBC’s Green Week theme journalistically troubling.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of November 5-9, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ won among Households (6.3/12) and tied for first place among the Adult 25-54 rating (2.3/9). Among Total Viewers, the ABC broadcast averaged 9.18 million, with just 50,000 separating ABC and NBC for the week. This marks ‘World News” best delivery among Total and key demo viewers in more than eight months (week of February 26, 2007).”

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the No. 1 network evening newscast, winning the week of November 5-9, 2007 in both total viewers and among the key demographic adults 25-54.”

  • Gannett Blog reports, “Gannett disclosed that revenue at its U.S. newspapers rose just 11% in the third quarter from the year-ago period, a Gannett Blog reader reminded me today. That’s down from 12% growth in the first and second quarters — a rate that was already below the industry average.”

  • WorldScreen.com reports, “According to a report by Global Media Intelligence in association with its partner Merrill Lynch, movies no longer make money in large part because of the ever-growing participation deals studios make with stars, directors and producers.”

  • AP reports, “About 500 unionized news writers could soon join their creative colleagues on the picket line. The writers, employees of CBS News television and radio, are expected to overwhelmingly approve a strike authorization. Represented by Writers Guild of America East, the writers were scheduled to vote Thursday.”

  • “With the exception of the war in Iraq, international affairs tend not to generate major media interest. But General Pervez Musharraf’s Nov. 3 declaration of emergency rule in Pakistan proved to be a dramatic exception to that rule — and there may be several disquieting reasons why,” according to the Pew News Coverage Index for November 4-9.

  • The Susan B. Anthony List Candidate Fund, “a national pro-life Political Action Committee, officially launched its online 2008 campaign efforts with the unveiling of a new website to highlight pro-life candidates.” According to the release, “The website, www.sba-listcf.org, allows Susan B. Anthony List members to bundle contributions for pro-life Congressional candidates, access political updates about key Congressional races, register to vote and engage in pro-life advocacy efforts.”

  • TVWeek reports, “An online powerhouse is getting ready to take on TV. Twentieth Television has entered a deal with Internet mega-site Yahoo! to develop a series featuring popular Web videos for syndication that could air next year.”

  • The Washington Social Diary reports on “the gala affair that was held to honor the Iraq and Afghanistan wounded who reside at Walter Reed Army Hospital.”

  • A release announced, “Navy TV, a new online TV network featuring the U.S. Navy 24 hours a day on demand, was launched today at www.navytv.org. Hosted by the United States Navy Memorial and created for all to use and enjoy, Navy TV plans to showcase a variety of cutting-edge short videos highlighting today’s Navy at sea around the world as well as classic clips from the service’s proud history.”

  • The University of Maryland announced, “Award-winning journalists will discuss the techniques, hazards and rewards of covering the most difficult stories of our time when they gather in Shoemaker 2102 beginning at 2 p.m. Nov. 19. D.C.-area anchor Mike Walter of WUSA-TV will join Australian journalist Gary Tippet of The Age and Natalie Pompilio, a writer based in Philadelphia who has provided on-the-ground coverage of the war in Iraq and Hurricane Katrina. All are members of The Dart Society, an organization that provides outreach to journalists who cover trauma.”

  • AP reports, “News Corp., the media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch, spent $1.7 million to lobby the federal government in the first half of 2007, according to a disclosure form.”

  • CNET News.com reports, “no one should be surprised that newspapers are struggling and that newspaper alliances springing up to tackle online ads have that whiff of desperation.”

  • washingtonpost.com’s new music blog Post Rock recapped Bruce Springsteen’s concert at the Verizon Center. Check it out here.

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins reports, “Bob Schieffer’s big weekend get? GOP presidential contender Mike Huckabee! He’s surging! Dynamic! And how best to play up your guest’s surging dynamism? Well, it’d probably be wise to avoid asking questions that were posed to the candidate just days before on Hardball. Unfortunately, Schieffer spent a lot of his time covering the same well-worn ground on Sunday morning.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Earlier this year, Google quietly added a new feature to its maps program, a tool that allows users to customize driving directions by clicking and dragging on a map to create a detour. A few months later, the developers of Gmail, Google’s free e-mail program, unveiled an upgrade to allow messages to synchronize with other e-mail systems. The alterations to these popular programs are minuscule compared with two larger recent news events: Google’s announcement of a partnership, called Android, to make it easier to navigate the Web on cellphones, and its introduction of OpenSocial, a cooperative effort to make it easier for developers to create tools for social networking sites such as MySpace.”

  • New York Daily News reports,Dan Rather was in Cuba Monday, hoping for a gift from above in the form of an interview with Fidel Castro. He’d been told it wasn’t going to happen, but he’s not giving up. ‘I have no expectations,’ said Rather. ‘Do I have hope? I always have hope. You drive to the heart of the story and give yourself your best chance.’ It’s been that way for the past year, since news legend and former CBS anchor Rather joined Mark Cuban’s HDNet.”

  • AP reports, “News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said Tuesday he intends to make access to The Wall Street Journal’s Web site free, dropping subscription fees in exchange for anticipated ad revenue.”

  • The Daily Record reports, “Sandy Hillman has resigned as vice chairman of Baltimore ad agency Trahan Burden Charles to start her own public relations agency.”

  • The Fayetteville Observer has a “Q&A with Bob Woodward”

  • Wired reports,Barry Diller Says He Might Like to Buy AOL”

  • Richard Benedetto writes in Politico, “In wartime, low death toll is news, too”

  • The San Francisco Chronicle reports, “The crowd of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs making big bets on a global revolution in green technology added one more big name Monday: Al Gore. The former Democratic vice president and recent Nobel Peace Prize winner announced he is joining the prestigious Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers as a partner in the firm’s effort to finance global warming solutions.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin is expected to unveil his plans for reforming the agency’s media ownership rules as soon as Tuesday, which could pave the way for the proposed sale of Tribune Co. (TRB) to receive regulatory approval.”

  • Martin writes in the New York Times, “If we don’t act to improve the health of the newspaper industry, we will see newspapers wither and die.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Cable-television companies including Comcast Corp. are fighting a plan by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to claim new regulatory powers.”

  • B&C reports, “MSNBC Monday launched its redesigned msnbc.com Web site. Surfers will be able to customize the site to reorder the stories any way they like, says the news channel, including tabs that allow them to access up to 15 stories in each section. Those stories will also have more videos, photos, and slide shows.”

  • CNBC reports, “News Corp Chairman Rupert Murdoch said on Tuesday the company had made a strong start to the second quarter with the global credit market squeeze so far not having much affect on forward advertising.”

  • Huffington Post’s Alex Leo asks, “When Is a Scandal Like a Gate?”

    Jobs

  • Post-Newsweek Media, Inc. is looking for a Publisher.

  • DBC Public Relations Experts is looking for a New Media AE.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.13.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think The Washington Post’s reaction to Tim Page was too harsh.

  • Mitt Romney Loses Coveted Endless Simmer Endorsement”

  • Is that CBS’s Matthew Felling hosting the Kojo Nnamdi Show today?

  • Get ready for tomorrow’s Meet the Press party…and Rush Limbaugh?!?

  • New York Times presents, “Stray Questions for: P.J. O’Rourke

  • New York Post reports,Jack Ford, the son of the late President Gerald Ford, is teaming up with magazine entrepreneur Don Welsh to launch a new publishing company, Mountain Time Publishing.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Presidents and candidates have graced the covers of men’s style mags going back to John F. Kennedy, who posed in the Oval Office for the March 1962 issue of GQ. … For men, these magazines offer an opportunity to shape their images. … So why is a women’s fashion magazine a minefield for Hillary Clinton? It’s a double standard to be sure. A male candidate appearing in a men’s magazine is getting his message out. A female candidate appearing in a women’s magazine is falling into a stereotype and opening herself up to criticism for caring more about her looks than the issues.”

  • Reuters reports, “Investors punished shares of the Walt Disney Co and other large media companies on Friday after U.S. consumer sentiment hit a two-year low and sparked worries about cuts in advertising, analysts said.”

  • AP reports, “AOL, a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc. said Monday it purchased Yedda Inc., a social search question and answer service.”

  • Tech Check reports,Marc Andreessen Warns ‘Old Media’ Over Writers’ Strike”

  • Mel Karmazin, chief executive officer of Sirius Satellite Radio, met with the Tribune editorial board Wednesday to discuss the proposed merger of Sirius with XM Satellite Radio, shock jock Howard Stern and the intense competition in media markets.” Check it out here.

  • Andrew Sullivan speaks candidly” to Jennie Rothenberg Gritz “about why he supports Barack Obama, how he became a blogger, and why he’s not afraid to change his mind.”

  • Ad Age reports,Peggy Northrop is leaving her post as editor in chief at More magazine to become editor in chief of Reader’s Digest”

  • Washington Times reports, “Hollywood producer Joel Surnow dismissed as ‘nuts’ the notion that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton can be elected president and said he and other conservatives in the entertainment industry are leaning toward supporting Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani’s presidential campaign.”

  • Redding News Review won its first “Black Web Award.” Congrats!

  • The PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of Oct. 28-Nov. 2, 2007 shows, “Thanks in part to the Democrats’ spirited debate in Philadelphia, last week was the biggest week of the year for the presidential campaign in the universe of radio and cable talk shows. The main course was the Democratic front runner who got carved up by hosts and pundits of various political stripes.”

  • The Independent reports, “The editor of ‘Time’ magazine, Richard Stengel, tells Ian Burrell why even his publication can’t afford to stand still if it wants to compete in an increasingly hi-tech industry.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “Ifra will launch a vertical search engine for the newspaper industry in January, its CEO claimed.”

  • AP reports, “The first lead story on MinnPost.com, a new daily news site, is a 1,400-word report on the Minnesota Democratic Party’s finances. It’s not the kind of flashy tidbit guaranteed to goose online traffic. But flash isn’t the idea at MinnPost, a venture staffed mostly by recent casualties of newspaper downsizing.”

  • Internet News reports, “A few years ago, it might have seemed far-fetched to imagine representatives from traditional media stalwarts like The New York Times and MTV Networks urging others to follow their lead in adapting to survive an evolving online environment. But the times, they are a-changing.”

  • Check out Nick Sweezey’s contestant interview from Jeopardy!

  • Reason’s Marty Beckerman interviews Matt Taibbi, “Rolling Stone’s controversial chief political reporter on Campaign 2008, following Hunter S. Thompson, and his new book.”

  • WTTG launched a new Web site. Check it out here.

  • CNN reports, “The man who revealed that Valerie Plame worked for the CIA said that he was ‘extraordinarily foolish’ to leak her name. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage was a source of the CIA leak to columnist Robert Novak. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer in an interview broadcast Sunday that he did not realize Plame was a covert agent when he discussed her with syndicated columnist Robert Novak.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “As the television writers’ strike slowly gnaws its way through the TV grid, the question arises: What else is there to watch? Doesn’t Al Gore have some kind of television channel, among his many worthy pursuits? Maybe nobody there’s on strike.”

  • The New Republic’s Michael Crowley writes about, “Clinton’s strategy for crushing the media.”

  • Randy Bennett, Vice President of Audience and New Business Development for the Newspaper Association of America writes about the new Imagining the Future of Newspapers Blog. “We asked 22 of some of the more insightful thinkers we know to provide their perspectives on how newspapers can shape their own future. Some are currently employed by newspapers, but most are outside observers (analysts, futurists, academics, customers, etc.) without a vested interest in the success or failure of new business or journalistic approaches. There were no restrictions. All were free to write on any aspect of the newspaper business and offer up positive or negative prognoses. The goal: stimulate ideas and discussions about the newspaper franchise 5-10 years from now. We will be posting several commentaries a day (to give you time to digest) over the next week.”

  • The New York Times’ Public Editor writes,Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers the White House for The Times, gets a steady stream of complaints from readers about a curious issue. These readers, like Susan Lonsinger of Bakersfield, Calif., object to the fact that The Times refers to President Bush as Mr. Bush on second and later references in news articles. They think that’s disrespectful and that he should always be called President Bush.”

  • Deborah Howell writes, “A new president will be elected a year from now. Voters will look to the mainstream media, to alternative bloggers and to the candidates’ Web sites to help decide who that president will be. A perennial complaint is that the media cover politics too much as a horse race instead of reporting more on the candidates’ backgrounds, where they stand on issues and how they would lead the nation. But is it true? I intend to find out — at least at The Post — and report back to readers.”

  • The Columbia Tribune reports, “Consider the name: Pulitzer. Joseph Pulitzer and the prize named after him enjoy recognition and respect, especially in this town, home to the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism. But how many people, including working journalists, know and appreciate the rich stories — both human and historical — behind those coveted gold medals? As it turns out, not very many, said Roy Harris Jr. — the author of ‘Pulitzer’s Gold’ — whose book fills a huge gap of knowledge about the coveted Public Service awards given for coverage of some of the biggest stories of the past 90 years, including the Ponzi scheme, the Great Depression, civil rights, Watergate, the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and Hurricane Katrina.”

  • “FBNY discusses Slovenia, the age gap in comedy, the profitability of print media and a few other things” with The Onion’s Scott Dikkers.

  • CNN.com reports, “So, what exactly is news in a virtual world? CNN has opened an I-Report hub in the virtual world of Second Life. CNN aims to find out by opening an I-Report hub in Second Life, a three-dimensional virtual world created entirely by its residents.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to impose significant new regulations to open the cable television market to independent programmers and rival video services after determining that cable companies have become too dominant in the industry, senior commission officials said.”

    Jobs

  • Home Front Communications is looking for a Media Specialist.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Writer.

  • New Media AE is looking for DBC Public Relations Experts.

  • The Atlantic Media Company is looking for a Staff Correspondent to cover the White House for National Journal.

  • Home Front Communications is seeking Detail-Oriented Web Project Manager.

  • WUSA9 is looking for a Producer and an Executive Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.18.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • It’s a close one, but it looks doubtful that Stephen Colbert’s presidential bid in SC will do any major damage.

  • Roll Call announced that Jay Heflin is going to be joining the CongressNow staff full-time beginning today. He will be covering taxes and trade.

  • An ACLU release announced, “The American Civil Liberties Union today expressed disappointment with the version of the Free Flow of Information Act of 2007 that passed in the House last night, but believes the reporters’ shield legislation is a step in the right direction. H.R. 2102, introduced by Rep. Mike Pence (R-IN) and Rick Boucher (D-VA), will lessen the chance that reporters will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources.”

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on the House floor on Tuesday, “Nearly all states have some form of a press shield protecting the confidentiality of journalists’ sources. However, that protection is lacking at the federal level and in federal courts. ‘It is for this reason that I have long supported a federal press shield law, without which freedom of the press is threatened. The federal government’s policies and actions should protect and preserve the press’s ability to speak truth to power. And this legislation does so with appropriate national security safeguards, striking a careful balance between liberty and security.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Today the U.S. Congress is slated to act on H.R. 2102, a proposed federal shield law. Not surprisingly, the White House has vowed to veto it, citing a fear of increased leaks. Here’s the full statement from the White House Office of Management and Budget, which has been circulated to reporters but not yet posted on OMB’s site.”

  • John Curley, the first editor of USA Today, and the man who succeeded Al Neuharth as president, chairman and CEO of Gannett Corporation and now a professor and distinguished professional in residence at Penn State University, and co-director of PSU’s Center for Sports Journalism, “says it’s time newspapers, instead of moaning and groaning about falling numbers, went back to doing more ‘enterprise reporting’ that they used to do and many still do.”

  • The Horses Mouth reports, “NY Times Editorial Board Announces New Group Blog”

  • Radar Online reports, “Was Rowland Evans, Robert Novak’s conservative lifelong reporting partner, secretly gay? Richard Nixon and his chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, thought so, and according to internal memos obtained by Radar through the Freedom of Information Act, they tasked the FBI with proving it.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Morgan Stanley has sold its 7.2 percent stake in The New York Times Company, people close to the matter said today.”

  • Daily Northwestern reports, “The Medill School of Journalism is forming a committee to explore a possible name change. Dean John Lavine said the committee will consider altering the name to better represent the school and what it offers.”

  • Check out a new tool on the Kaiser Family Foundation’s health08.org website that allows for comparisons of the presidential candidates health care proposals.

  • There’s a game called Whack-A-Murdoch.

  • Huffington Post has “Video Proof: Bill O’Reilly Doesn’t Care About Black People”

  • Check out TNR’s The Stump. “We’ve conceived The Stump as the campaign blog you can consult to stay current without drowning in ephemeral detail.”

  • Roll Call reports, “With the House passage of a media shield bill yesterday, reporters across the country secured a legislative victory most were too uncomfortable to actually ask for.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The representatives voted by an overwhelming margin of 398 to 21 in favor of the bill. A similar bill in the Senate (S. 1267) was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee and is now awaiting a vote by the full Senate. President Bush said yesterday he would veto the bill, but the margin of the House vote is wide enough to override a veto in that body.”

  • Oliver Willis writes, “Is it any wonder that the same publication that argued so strongly against Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King now attacks Al Gore?”

  • Washington Post reports, “The House yesterday overwhelmingly passed first-ever federal protections for journalists pressured to reveal confidential sources, as lawmakers from both parties backed legislation that advocates for the news media have sought for a generation.”

  • TVNewser reports, “It has hosted Britney Spears, the Bachelorette and the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition launch party. Tuesday morning New York City’s Gotham Hall hosted a political convention of sorts; a sales pitch for advertisers to buy time or space on CNN and CNN.com.”
  • Steven Webber joins the First Friday Collective as a guest blogger.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Extending an olive branch to restless TV and film writers, the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers said Tuesday that it had withdrawn an unpopular proposal on residual payments that had threatened to derail contract talks.”

  • IWR reports, “Google has damped down speculation that it will extend its Google Book Search platform to include magazines with an ISSN number. Technical difficulties with digitising magazines and a lack of existing archives were cited as the main reasons”.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “As much as one-fifth of the audience for television’s most popular shows are skipping the commercials, according to the first round of commercial data for the new fall season, released yesterday by Nielsen Media Research.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Obama Girl has found a new friend in Herb Scannell, whose online video startup Next New Networks has acquired BarelyPolitical.com, the site behind the viral-video hit.”

  • The BBC reports, “Plans for sweeping changes at the BBC over the next six years are being discussed on Wednesday by the BBC Trust, which represents licence-payers.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Murdoch To Times: I Will Bury You! Keller Bristles”

  • A Comcast release announced, “Comcast Corporation (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK), the nation’s leading provider of cable, entertainment and communications products and services, announced today that David Krone will join the company as Senior Vice President for Corporate Affairs, effective January 2, 2008.”

  • Compete reports, “Nearly a month after the New York Times shut down TimesSelect, the subscription-based service for premium content on NYTimes.com, traffic to areas of the site that were previously members-only is flowing fast and free. With popular columnists like Paul Krugman and Maureen Dowd drawing thousands of curious readers and fans, the Opinion section has more than doubled unique visitors, while the overall NYTimes.com site has grown by roughly 10% in the same period.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, said third-quarter profit fell 10 percent as classified advertising sales and television revenue dropped.”

  • TVNewser reports, Tom Shales: ‘Matt Lauer Is No Mike Wallace’”

  • WWD.com reports, “Former Men’s Journal and Details editor in chief Michael Caruso signed on last year as a contributing editor at large at Portfolio and came back as planned from a two-week vacation on Monday, but by the end of the day, staffers were told his contract hadn’t been renewed.”

  • AP reports, “Gannett Co., the largest newspaper publisher in the country and owner of USA Today, said Wednesday that third-quarter earnings fell 10.5 percent, fueled in part by slumping real-estate ads and a tough comparison to year-ago results boosted by heavy political advertising.”

  • Media Newsline reports,Jefferson Morley, a 15-year veteran at the Washington Post, has joined the Center for Independent Media as its National Editorial Director, with overall responsibility for guiding the Center’s fast-growing network of 40 journalists, and overseeing the launch of a new Washington DC-based online news site with 10 reporters in late 2007.”

  • New York Post reports, “Time Managing Editor Rick Stengel once again is shuffling the deck among the magazine’s top brass now that Priscilla Painton, one of his three deputy editors, has opted out.”

  • Arts Technica reports, “House passes federal journalist shield, includes bloggers”

  • Washington Post reports, “Government repression in some countries has shifted from journalists to bloggers, with the vitality of the Internet triggering a more focused crackdown as blogs increasingly take the place of mainstream news media, according to Lucie Morillon, Washington director of the advocacy group Reporters Without Borders.”

  • New York Times reports, “Internet companies with funny names, little revenue and few customers are commanding high prices. And investors, having seemingly forgotten the pain of the first dot-com bust, are displaying symptoms of the disorder known as irrational exuberance.”

    Jobs

  • Atllantic Information Services, Inc. is looking for a Health Care Reporter/Editor.

  • The Frederick News-Post is looking for a Page Designer.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Freelance Writer for Telecom/Media.

  • Bloomberg is looking for an Economy Editor.

  • American Diabetes Association is looking for a Health & Wellness Staff Writer, a Science Writer and a Health & Wellness Features Editor.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for an Assistant Producer.

  • The Chronicle of Philanthropy is looking for an editorial intern.

  • The Progress-Index is looking for a sports reporter.

  • American Chemical Society is looking for Product Coordinators, Publishing.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.25.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think Jon Stewart could totally take Tucker Carlson in a fist fight.

  • CBSNews.com’s Matthew Felling — fresh back from his stint on “Morning Joe” — is hosting today’s “Kojo Nnamdi Show” on WAMU 88.5FM from noon to two.

  • Printing poll on Iraqi deaths would be irresponsible

  • Keith St. Clair, an AME at the Examiner since March 2006, is joining the Associated Press as a Night Supervisor based in Los Angeles.

  • Webpro News reports, “This hot little rumor has been bouncing around through the weekend: Google could be willing to purchase satellite radio provider Sirius.”

  • Brokaw Honored for ‘Taking a Stand for Press Freedom’

  • CNN Election Bus Rolls Through NYC

  • FCC proposes ‘fake news’ fine

  • Market Watch reports, “Shares of Google Inc. hit an all-time high Friday, amid a flurry of upbeat news including new share rankings for the Internet-search market and an analyst’s report on ways the company may one day reach $100 billion in annual revenue.”

  • On “tomorrow’s newsrooms.”

  • Scotsman.com reports, “Peter Chernin, the president of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation, promised the media giant will ‘crush’ the Financial Times after acquiring its big rival in America.”

  • Sage advice for aspiring journalists

  • Clinton campaign kills negative story

  • FT.com reports, “Online advertising spending is widely predicted to continue its strong growth even if a US economic downturn squeezes the advertising sector as a whole.”

  • Mediabistro.com “will mark its 10th anniversary with a gala celebration on Thursday, October 4th at The Plumm, 246 West 14th Street in New York City. To celebrate mediabistro.com’s remarkable growth over the past decade, mediabistro will honor ten individuals whose media careers have skyrocketed during the same period with Golden Boa Awards in the 10 verticals that mediabistro.com serves. Festivities will begin at 7:00 pm.” For more info, click here.

  • Test your news IQ with Pew!

  • A ICFJ release announced, “Anton Kazarin, editor-in-chief of the business magazine group Delovoy Kvartal, has been named winner of the 2007 Paul Klebnikov Fund Prize for Excellence in Journalism. Kazarin will be honored at ICFJ’s Annual Awards Dinner at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., on November 13.”

  • AFF “announced a contest for the best college blog with a grand prize of $10,000. The purpose of the contest is to encourage original liberty-minded blogger journalism on college campuses and to identify young conservative and libertarian talent who wish to pursue careers as journalists and writers. The contest is open to all graduate and undergraduate bloggers age 25 and younger.” For more info, click here.

  • Poynter Online reports, “This week, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee will take up the Free Flow of Information Act of 2007, sponsored by senators Arlen Specter R-Pa. and Charles E. Schumer D-N.Y. There are 10 co-sponsors from the Senate and 71 from the identical House version.”

  • A tipster tells us, “BBC World News America is building a new set in Washington at the moment. They are also preparing for World News Today on Oct. 1.”

  • A Sierra Club release announced, “A former vice president, a New York Times reporter, and a California Assemblyman who have helped raise awareness of global warming are among those receiving awards from the Sierra Club this year.” They include former Vice President Al Gore, Tom Friedman and Congressman Mike Thompson.”

  • Media Matters is calling on readers to contact their local papers and “help end the conservative advantage” of syndicated columnists.

  • The 2007 MacArthur Fellows, awarded by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced on this morning. For more information, click here.

  • Center for American Progress says, “Know Your Sources: The Mainstream Press Keeps Finding Wacky Immigration ‘Experts’”

  • “The Moving Picture Institute will host the world premiere of Indoctrinate U at the American Film Renaissance Film Festival in Washington, D.C. on Friday, September 28, 2007, at 7:30 pm ET at the Kennedy Center’s Terrace Auditorium.” Tickets are available for $10 and can be purchased by calling 877-933-4730 or clicking here.

  • The AP reports, “An experimental online ‘mashup’ — a build-your-own Democratic presidential debate — attracted more than 1 million viewers in the past 10 days, many of them young people drawn to the interactivity of the Internet. … Yahoo, HuffingtonPost.com and Slate.com conceived the format as a way to give online viewers the ability to build a debate with video blocks of each candidate answering different questions on education, health care and the war from PBS host Charlie Rose.”

  • Amy Doolittle is covering transportation issues for DCist.

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “With only one new non-heterosexual regular character this coming season — Bonnie Somerville’s bisexual Caitlin Dowd on ABC’s drama ‘Cashmere Mafia’ — the number of portrayals of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people on scripted network series declined for a third straight year, according to the annual ‘Where We Are on TV’ study by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation.”

  • Guardian reports, “BBC News is to join the media stampede for integration by merging its TV, radio and online newsrooms, although the new set-up will immediately face an annual budget cut of 5% over the next five years.”

  • Ad Age’s Simon Dumenco writes, “Internet Company’s Headed to Big Apple, and This Columnist Is Rooting for the Suddenly Agile Giant”

  • Media 3.0 reports, “MySpace recently announced a deal with Marshall Herskovitz and Edward Zwick, the team behind Thirtysomething and My So-Called Life to create Quarterlife, an online show about post-college twenty-somethings. Unless it was a very slow news day, this would not be on most people’s radar — at least not until the show was a hit. However, what makes this particular press release interesting is that the producers have announced that the hour long show (which will be broken up in to segments for online viewing) will have ‘TV-level production values’ and ‘TV-level production costs.’”

  • New York Times reports, “Media consumers have said, loudly and repeatedly, that they want to watch what they want, when and where they want it. Last week NBC called that bluff, saying that its prime-time broadcast schedule would be there for free downloading for a week after being shown on television. In doing so, the network is leaving behind a business model that is as old as “I Love Lucy”: audiences who make appointments with their favorite shows and who then show up in numbers that open up advertisers’ wallets.”

  • “‘What would students do,’ one journalism researcher wondered, ‘if they got to create a media by them, for them — to create whatever they want, and not have to worry about what’s always been?’” Curious? Insider Higher Ed has the answer.

  • Market Watch’s John Dvorak writes, “With the recent discussions of various news organizations eliminating subscription or paid services, whether it’s Dow Jones & Co. or the New York Times Co., it might be time for shareholders to evaluate the future prospects of all the newspaper-publishing companies.”

  • Boston Globe reports, “Among the investments that Jim Savage, a Waltham venture capitalist, is considering is a North Carolina company introduced to him in an unorthodox way: The entrepreneur posted a comment on Savage’s blog.”

  • AP reports, “The social networking Web site MySpace is launching a free, advertising-supported cell phone version Monday as part of a wider bid by parent News Corp. to attract advertising for mobile Web sites.”

  • Media Week reports, “The Week, Felix Dennis’ tightly edited news digest, has launched a new Web site that will attempt to do every day what the magazine does on a weekly basis.”

  • B&C reports, “PBS is looking to avoid airing profanities ‘in the teeth’ of the Federal Communications Commission’s enforcement regime. While the commission’s crackdown on cussing has been called into question by a federal court, PBS is taking no chances, or at least fewer than it could, with Ken Burns’ documentary, The War.”

  • Yesterday was “National Punctuation Day”

  • ABC Digital Chief: The Network Still Matters

  • The AP reports, “Starbucks Corp. plans to give away 50 million free digital songs to customers in all of its domestic coffee houses to promote a new wireless iTunes music service that’s about to debut in select markets.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.18.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think the Yankees will make it to the playoffs.

  • Starting on Friday, C-SPAN Radio 90.1 FM in the Washington/Baltimore area is now broadcasting three channels in HD. If you have an HD radio, you’ll be able to hear these three C-SPAN Radio stations for free at 90.1. For more info, click here.

  • A release announced, “In an effort to ensure transparency and accountability in the continuing debate over the future of media ownership in America, Representatives Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Bart Stupak (D-MI), Louise Slaughter (D-NY) and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) … wrote to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Kevin Martin to request his immediate attention to a number of controversies surrounding the FCC’s activities on ten scientific studies released by the agency in late July.”

  • Shelly Palmer, “award-winning inventor, technologist, composer and television producer” will be the featured speaker at a seminar hosted by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. “Mr. Palmer’s presentation takes place 7- 9pm, Wednesday, September 26th at the Intelsat Building, 3007 Tilden Street, NW, Washington. Admission is free to students and NATAS members, $15 for non-NATAS members, payable at the door.”

  • Cable Takes A Ratings Hit

  • TheGarance has a guide to Iowa every political reporter should check out.

  • New York Magazine reports, “Denizens of the Wall Street Journal’s genteel newsroom were in need of smelling salts last Wednesday after reports surfaced that the paper’s new owner, Rupert Murdoch, brought Col Allan, the editor-in-chief of the New York Post, to a kick-the-tires meeting with their bosses.”

  • Al Neuharth, USA TODAY founder and former chair and chief executive officer of Gannett Co., Inc., addressed more than 1,200 guests and staff at a reception at USA TODAY’s headquarters in McLean, Va., on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the nation’s newspaper. Founded in 1982, USA TODAY’s launch was the most expensive and closely watched newspaper debut in history; 25 years later it is the nation’s top selling newspaper.” Check out his remarks here.

  • FishbowlNY reports, “The Kurt Eichenwald underage porn/cash payment story just got a hell of a lot more creepy.”

  • “PoliticsOnline and the World E-Gov Forum are proud to announce the list for nominations of the Top 10 Who Are Changing the World of Internet and Politics.” Check it out here.

  • Portfolio’s Jack Flack has “10 things that Rupert Murdoch may need to do with Dow Jones”

  • The International Center for Journalists announced, “Three leading journalists with long experience in business journalism will join the international faculty of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program at Beijing’s Tsinghua University. They include Robert J. Dowling, former managing editor of BusinessWeek International; Ann M. Morrison, former editor of Time Europe; and Nailene Chou Wiest, who was a Knight International Journalism Fellow in China and had worked for Reuters there. Wiest also will serve as the program’s co-director.”

  • The Etelos Ecosystem has partnered with the Web application company Entrecore.

  • Reuters reports, “Fears that a possible U.S. recession will sap advertising spending have soured investors on the media industry, but some entertainment companies just might be more resilient than Wall Street thinks.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The New York Post is about to find out whether a glossy magazine can lift the fortunes of a gritty tabloid. Hoping to increase Sunday circulation and high-end advertising, the Post is introducing Page Six Magazine starting this Sunday.”

  • Fox Business Network has a new logo.

  • Connecticut Post’s Paul Janensch writes, “Q: Professor News, why did many journalists call USA Today ‘McPaper?’ A: Because, they said, it was the news equivalent of fast food — easy to swallow but not very nourishing. The criticism may have been warranted in its early years. But ‘The Nation’s Newspaper,’ which turned 25 last week, has proven to be enormously successful and widely imitated.”

  • At 25, ‘McPaper’ Is All Grown Up

  • Reuters reports, “Six months after grabbing Oscar glory for his eco-documentary ‘An Inconvenient Truth,’ former Vice President Al Gore collected an Emmy Award on Sunday for his fledgling youth-oriented cable network, Current TV.”

  • Economist leaves news fluff to others

  • The Associated Press reports, “Shares of New York Times Co. hit a 52-week low for the second day in a row Thursday as a Goldman Sachs analyst cut his price target and lowered some earnings estimates, citing disappointing August ad revenue results.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “NYT Has Seen Future: It’s All the Blogging That’s Fit to Print”

  • WAMU 88.5 announced, “Senior Commentator and Washington, D.C., radio veteran Fred Fiske will celebrate 60 years on the airwaves in Washington, D.C., on September 27.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Reed Elsevier Plc and Wolters Kluwer NV, two publishers that abandoned a merger in 1998, should again consider combining because of the ‘compelling’ strategic and financial logic of such a step, Merrill Lynch & Co. said.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Dow Jones & Company and its main labor union have moved close to agreement on a contract for reporters and other employees at The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires, union officials said yesterday.”

  • From the Houston Chronicle, “Hardly a day passes without a reader (or two) accusing the paper of having an unabashed affinity for the opinions of ‘liberal’ columnists — eschewing those of conservatives. It’s a spurious assertion to which I reply: ‘What paper are you reading?’”

  • Chicago Tribune’s Michael Tackett writes, “The president lost another member of his senior staff Friday when Tony Snow ended his stint as White House press secretary. Snow is the third man to hold that job for President Bush, and by almost any measure, the best. His loss may be felt even more directly than that of the talented Mr. Rove.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “A newsroom without news editors might be the dream of many a trod-upon reporter. But if that really were the case, and it was online users instead who set the news agenda, a new report from The Project for Excellence in Journalism suggests the stories they’d choose to lead the day, and the sources of news to which they’d pay attention, would put us in a very different world of news.”

  • Check out Andrew Sullivan’s first reader contest and vote for the best movie line ever.

  • Daryn Kagan’s documentary film, “Breaking the Curse”, aired last night on WETA and will re-air tonight at 5PM.

  • Laura Rozen reports, “The network says it acted quickly when it discovered consultant Alexis Debat had misrepresented his credentials. But sources say a real investigation of his work is beginning only now.”

  • Gawker reports, “Times deputy managing editor Jonathan Landman, in one of his weekly memos to the staff about ‘Innovation,’ lays this deepness on you (emphasis ours): ‘Times have changed. Our online storytelling skills have evolved to the point where you really can get the whole story without reading a newspaper article.’”

  • The cover of Alan Greenspan’s new book, The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World, features a cover portrait shot by U.S. News & World Report’s Jeff MacMillan several years ago for the magazine.

  • The Washington Post’s Frank Aherns writes, “The head of a burgeoning Afghan media empire looked down at his new BlackBerry, vibrating against a table in Washington earlier this week. ‘Afghan civilians injured in Gereshk suicide bombing,’ read the e-mail headline. Another day, another suicide bombing in another town. Another too-typical news event for Saad Mohseni’s stations to broadcast across a country where prime-time programming is scheduled to fit the nighttime hours when electrical generators are switched on.”

  • “News media organizations must become portfolio entrepreneurs that make experimentation and ‘iteration’ a way of life and that ‘put risk and speed at the center of the corporate altar,’ a new report from the Media Management Center concludes.”

  • A tipster tells us, “hotline is having a party, just later this fall. or so i hear.”

  • Variety reports, “News Corp. topper Peter Chernin has urged British TV chiefs to adopt innovative, risk-taking strategies and embrace new media — or risk extinction.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc is testing an experimental social network service called Mash that makes it easy for Yahoo users to share tidbits of their lives with friends and family online, the company said on Sunday. Mash, to which a limited number of public users began being invited as testers on Friday, was described by a spokeswoman as a new, next-generation service that is independent from the company’s 2-1/2 year-old Yahoo 360 degree profile service.”

  • NY Post reports, “By the time many of this fall’s new TV shows premiere later this month, a number of Web-savvy viewers will have already given their thumbs-up or thumbs-down. That’s because networks including NBC and Fox are offering free sneak peeks of the pilot episodes of their new shows online.”

  • Slate reports, “Why the WSJ Exodus Is Good for Murdoch”

  • New York Times reports, “Next year, The Wall Street Journal will introduce Pursuits, a glossy monthly magazine about the lifestyles of the rich, in hopes of drawing more ads for expensive consumer goods”

  • A reader writes in, “From a fan: Is Jose Antonio Vargas bumping fogies like Woodward off the front page? Vargas has had 9 front page stories on his online political beat. Where’s the NYT and WSJ?”

  • Forbes reports, “How’s USA Today celebrating it’s 25th anniversary this weekend? With shares of parent company Gannett at their lowest closing level in 10 years.”

  • AP reports USA Today “starts its second quarter century with plans to expand its brand beyond the world of journalism.”

  • E&P reports, “In another Web first, The New York Times has posted on its Web site a video Letter to the Editor from Charles Ferguson, the anti-war filmmaker, responding critically to L. Paul Bremer’s recent Op-Ed defending his order to dismantle the Iraqi Army in 2003 after the U.S. took Baghdad.”

  • Reuters reports, “Your cell phone may be one of the last spots around that’s relatively free of advertising — but not for long. Media and advertising companies have found a way of latching on to people’s handsets by beaming ads to them via Bluetooth, the same technology used in some hands-free headsets.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Screen Actors Guild announced Friday that it signed a contract to cover performers on “quarterlife,” a Web series that will debut Nov. 11 on MySpaceTV.com”

  • Need to Know News, LLC is looking for a Financial Markets Reporter.

  • The Guardian is looking for an Online Journalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Medical Writer.

  • The American Institute of Physics is looking for a News Reporter/Writer.

  • Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine is looking for a higher ed reporter.

  • ThinkTalk is seeking a Smart Dynamic Host.

  • UCG is looking for a Medical Coding Reporter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Social Policy Editor.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for a Photo Graphics Technician.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

  • The Washington Center for Politics & Journalism is offering a Politics & Journalism Semester Internship.

  • Campaign for America’s Future is looking for a Senior Communications Associate.

  • Spitfire Strategies is looking for a Senior Associate.

  • US Newsventures is looking for an Editor.

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Experienced Editor.

  • Girls’ Life is looking for an Online Editorial Director and Online Editorial Assistant.

  • TeamPeople is looking for a General Manager: Media Support, AV.

  • Legal Times is looking for an Advertising Director.

  • The Distilled Spirits Council is looking for a PR Manager.

  • The Hill newspaper is looking for a production designer/web assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.06.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think tattoos are low rent.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the just-completed Memorial Day to Labor Day period (May 28-September 2), ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54. In summer 2007, the ABC broadcast averaged 7.7 million Total Viewers and a 1.9/8 among key demo viewers, compared to NBC’s 7.41 million Total Viewers and a 1.8/8 and CBS’s 5.87 million Total Viewers and a 1.5/6.”

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the No. 1 network evening newscast, winning the week of August 27-31, 2007 in all categories. For the week, the NBC broadcast attracted 7.815 million total viewers, +219,000 more than ABC ‘World News” 7.596
    million, and an impressive 1,927,000 advantage over CBS ‘Evening News” 5.888 million.”

  • New York Times reports, “NBC Universal significantly deepened its relationship with Amazon’s digital video download service after a dispute with Apple over the pricing of television shows on iTunes. The media conglomerate, part of General Electric, said yesterday that Amazon had agreed to give it something that Apple would not: greater flexibility in the pricing and packaging of video downloads.”

  • Slate’s Jacob Rubin writes, “So Many Exclamation Points! A new style guide says we should pepper our e-mails with them. Really?”

  • “The Intelligence and National Security Alliance is commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the National Security Act of 1947 and the creation of our nation’s modern intelligence and national security establishments with a series of events during the week of September 17th-21st.” Sign up for events here!

  • The Bivings Group just released a study about American magazines’ use of the Internet. Check it out here.

  • NewsHour’s Margaret Warner is reporting from Pakistan. Check out here reports here.

  • From a release, “Ray Abernathy, a Washington, DC-based speech writer and communications consultant to labor unions, this week launches From the Left Bank of the Potomac, a wide-ranging commentary with weekly screeds from the political left as well as from left field. The blog, at www.rayabernathy.com, also showcases and sells Abernathy’s often offbeat fiction and invites author wannabes to help co-write the first ‘blogged beach book’ –a novel set in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.”

  • Poynter Online explores the, “Who’s on First? Online/Print Publishing Dilemma”

  • Check out the new blog that launched last week — DVMMoms.com, a W*USA 9 & Gannett Co. blog.

  • Come celebrate the first year of GOOD Magazine this Friday at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. The event is by R.S.V.P. only! Click here for more details.

  • Slate reintroduces “Build Your Own Slate”

  • Lesley Lopez, former hottie, created Guerilla Gourmand, a Washington D.C.- based cooking show for college students and young professionals, and is hosting a launch party for the show tonight from 5:30-8:00 at Jack’s Restaurant, at 1527 17th St NW.

  • Vanity Fair’s Evgenia Peretz writes, “Al Gore couldn’t believe his eyes: as the 2000 election heated up, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other top news outlets kept going after him, with misquotes (‘I invented the Internet’), distortions (that he lied about being the inspiration for Love Story), and strangely off-the-mark needling, while pundits such as Maureen Dowd appeared to be charmed by his rival, George W. Bush. For the first time, Gore and his family talk about the effect of the press attacks on his campaign—and about his future plans—to the author, who finds that many in the media are re-assessing their 2000 coverage.”

  • Media Matter’s Eric Boehlert writes, “The Iraq news blackout: how the press spent its summer vacation”

  • NY Post reports, “Investors sent Yahoo! shares up more than 5 percent yesterday after a Bear Stearns analyst said the Internet giant is a “top pick” in the technology sector and could be a possible takeover target for a company like Microsoft.”

  • AP reports, “Newspaper publisher McClatchy Co. said Tuesday it will keep its 14.4 percent stake CareerBuilder after resolving differences it had with the two other owners of the online job search site, Gannett Co. and Tribune Co.”

  • Human Events’ Capital Briefs reports, “The Republican-controlled board of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting could not bring itself to mandate the showing of Frank Gaffney’s documentary Islam vs. Islamists nor did it make any attempt to block the prime-time return of leftist Bill Moyers, but the board is very decisive when it comes to tax-paid junkets. The board’s latest trip was to Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, reports Al Kamen in the Washington Post. Prior to that, the board traveled to Alaska and Arizona.”

  • The New York Observer reports on, “MSNBC’s Dan Abrams’ War of Faith Against CNN. He attacks Anderson Cooper, Larry King, calls opposition ‘the Paris Hilton network’”

  • BBC reports, “Google’s Blogger site is being used by malicious hackers who are posting fake entries to some blogs.”

  • The Independent reports, “The Economist’s new quarterly lifestyle spin-off magazine, Intelligent Life, will be more than a guide to expensive stuff aimed at the super-rich, says its editor, Edward Carr.”

  • NY Post reports, “Niche Media Expands in New Office Space”

  • From The Hollywood Reporter, “CBS sticking with Couric for whole game”

  • AP reports, “ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’ Expanding, Although Not to Many TV Viewers”

  • E&P reports, “President Bush’s surprise trip to Iraq on Monday, which included just five White House reporters, marks the fourth time in the past month or so that Bush has made surprise news in one location while the White House press corps was en route to another. And that has at least a few veteran reporters perturbed.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The promotion of penny stocks, for years a staple of Internet spam and ‘boiler rooms’ running illegal pump-and-dump schemes, has recently burst forth in splashy full-page ads in major daily newspapers.”

  • A tipster writes in, “i would be interested in reading some reporting on why the Post didn’t reprint the Sunday Source that featured a full width picture of Dana Perino. It seemed foolish to feature a story about her buying dried mangoes with no mention of her being named WH Press Secy nearly 48 hours earlier.”

    Jobs

  • Association of Governing Boards is looking for Editorial Assistant.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Mutual Funds Freelance Writer.

  • The Brookings Institution is looking for a Online Communications Specialist.

  • Science News is looking for a Associate Publisher/Ad Sales Director.

  • Gridskipper is looking for contributors.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Obama First Pol To Grace GQ Cover In 15 Years

    First on FishbowlDC

    GQ asks: Does “the new star of the Democratic Party” have “the nerve, the political spine, and the will to do the (sometimes dirty) work it takes to get to the White House?”

    That was then (Nov. 1992)…

    1992gq.jpg

    …this is now (Sept. 2007)…

    septgq.jpg

    FishbowlDC has learned that Sen. Barack Obama will grace the cover of September’s GQ magazine. Ryan Lizza authors the cover story, which begins:

      We already know that Barack Obama has what it takes–the crowd-pleasing charisma, the outsize ambition, the audacity of hope–to be a serious candidate for president. But does he have all the rest–the nerve, the political spine, and the will to do the (sometimes dirty) work it takes to get to the White House? That is the question. A journey with the new star of the Democratic Party.

    Obama is the first politician to appear on GQ’s cover since Bill Clinton and Al Gore appeared on the men’s magazine cover nearly fifteen years ago (Nov. 1992). But the cover story almost didn’t happen. Writes Lizza:

      They struggled for weeks before deciding to agree to let him grace the cover of this magazine. “Frankly, I could do with fewer cover stories generally,” David Axelrod, Obama’s top strategist and adman told me during a recent visit to his Chicago office. “He’s an incredibly magnetic and also photogenic person, and so he lands on the covers of a lot of magazines. And that had its utility at one point, but it can get overdone. This is a really profound guy in many ways, and you don’t want him trivialized.”

    Lizza calls Obama “more of an old-fashioned pol than you think.” and says that, “underneath the inspirational leader who wants to change politics…is an ambitious, prickly, and occasionally ruthless politician.”

    septgq11.jpgseptgq22.jpg

    Other notes:

  • Obama has been trying to lower expectations of his candidacy…

  • On Hillary:

      I asked [communications director Robert] Gibbs if his understanding was that, despite the campaign’s rhetoric, Hillary had to be actively taken down. Gibbs looked at me and smiled. “We’re not running the race thinking we’re the horse in second,” he said, “and that ultimately the horse in first is just going to stop running.”

  • On Howard Dean:

      But Obama also offers a cautionary note. He leans back in his chair and crosses his legs. “Movement without organization,” he says, “without policy, without plans, will dissipate. Howard Dean, one could argue, back in 2004 helped to engineer a movement, a movement in opposition to the war. But there wasn’t a structure there and a set of policies and plans that would then lead to governance.”

    And yet…

      Obama is on his way to raising more money from a larger pool of donors than any presidential candidate in history. He will out-raise Hillary by an astounding $10 million for the quarter. He can parachute into almost any city in America and attract a crowd of thousands. But his poll numbers, both nationally and in the early primary states, still aren’t budging, and the whispers about Obama being the next Howard Dean are growing louder.

  • Lizza notes “Obama’s reputation for being a little thin-skinned.”

    septgq33.jpgseptgq44.jpg

  • “Few politicians are better than Obama at speaking about the most polarizing issues.”

  • “Pollsters are beginning to talk about Obama’s “beer problem.” Survey after survey shows that he appeals to the college-educated, “wine sipping” Democrats but isn’t reaching less educated “beer drinkers.”

  • “Personally, for me,” Obama says, “I think the story of my campaign is the ongoing struggle to maintain my voice and my compass in a process that in a lot of ways is slightly ridiculous.”

    (We also hear that one of those “50 Most Powerful People in Washington” is the Washington Post’s national news head, Susan Glasser).

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