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Posts Tagged ‘Al Roker’

Q: Where Were You on Sept. 11?

Today we ask Washington, D.C. journalists one question:

Where were you on Sept. 11?

Politico‘s Roger Simon: “I was just climbing in the car to drive to work when my wife came rushing into the garage to tell me of the attack on the first tower. Made phone calls and scribbled notes while driving into work, by which time second tower had been hit. Began making more calls, taking more notes and writing when the plane hit the Pentagon. More calls, more notes, more writing. Journalism can be a great anesthetic…until it wears off.”

The Hill‘s White House Correspondent Sam Youngman: “I was in college at Western Kentucky University. We had put the school paper to bed the night before, so I was sleeping in when my roommate woke me up. We sat there in silence watching the TV as the towers burned. He got up to get a beer, and I walked to the newsroom. A couple days later, my hillbilly buddies and I were ordering hundreds of bourbons at an all-you-can-drink bar. It seems silly, but listening to my drunk country buddies talk about what they would do to bin Laden gave me hope for the future of the country.”

Roll Call‘s John Stanton: “I was at the Inside Washington Office news room in Crystal City, which had a pretty great view of the Potomac and Pentagon. My desk faced out of a window, and I was just sitting down to check Drudge to see if he had any stories on the plane crashing into the building in New York. Something caught my eye over the top of my monitor. When I looked up you could see smoke and then flames coming from the Pentagon.”

HuffPost‘s Ryan Grim: “I was working at Chestertown Middle School on the Eastern Shore as an aide in a classroom of kids with behavioral problems (the same middle school I attended, actually). I remember giving a lesson about who Osama bin Laden was and why al Qaeda hated us. They actually sat and listened quietly to the entire thing, unpersuaded by my promises that Osama had no designs on Chestertown. My girlfriend, now wife, Elizan, was in Manhattan, and I was able to get a hold of her in the afternoon. Three weeks earlier, I’d turned down a job with Morgan Stanley on the 42nd floor of the second tower, a decision I’m very pleased with on a number of levels. Though I suspect I’d have been fine because I’m not one to be in the office by 9 a.m.”

Politico’s Julie Mason: “I drove with a coworker in a berserk, hurtling panic in a rental car from D.C. to NYC and covered the story from there for the Houston Chronicle for about 10 days. The thing that no one likes to say is that it was really the story of a lifetime — a huge challenge to try to understand and explain. And the trickiest part was writing about it clearly, without being overwrought — especially when you felt overwrought. I can’t believe it’s been 10 years.”

NBC and MSNBC “The Daily Rundown” Host Chuck Todd: “I was at ‘The Hotline,’ our offices at The Watergate on the third floor. We decided to publish, didn’t know what else to do. We turned it into a public service of sorts. Just loaded it up with every bit of info we could get our hands on, whatever every network was reporting. I’ll never forget the visual of my staff racing to the big windows we had overlooking the Potomac and simply staring in the sky wondering if another plane was coming – total frozen fear. I wouldn’t let anyone take the Metro home. A few of us with cars took everyone home. The four issues of that week 9/11,9/12, 9/13 and 9/14 are the proudest issues I oversaw during my days there. I still have them, framed.”

WaPo Opinion Writer Jonathan Capehart: “On Sept. 11, I went to vote in the Democratic Primary and then headed to my desk at the Bloomberg for Mayor campaign. At one point, I looked up at the bank of televisions and said, ‘Look, the World Trade Center is on fire!’ The rest of the day was a literal nightmare.”

C-SPAN Communications Director Howard Mortman: “Ten years ago I was still with ‘The Hotline,’ writing my online column.  Sept. 11, 2001 was the day of the New York City mayoral primary.  That morning, I boarded an Amtrak train to go cover the primary.  I even had an invite to Michael Bloomberg‘s election-night party.  The train left Washington around 8:30 a.m.  As I approached Baltimore headed north, my cell phone went off twice.  My wife of four months and a good friend both told me that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. Both warned me not to continue on to New York.  A minute later, the train arrived in Baltimore.  I decided to abandon the trip and got off.  The train left the station (I learned later that that train was one of many that became stranded that day).  In Baltimore, I saw on TV what was happening.  There were already huge lines for taxis.  No real options to head back south to D.C.  Back down on the train tracks, the light rail was still operating.  I got on a deserted light rail train. But it terminated at BWI airport.  About 30 minutes later I arrived at BWI airport.  By that point airports had stopped operating.  BWI was full of stranded — and dazed — travelers.  I saw on TV that the twin towers were gone.  I had no way of getting home, so I called my parents. They drove from Greenbelt and picked me up.  They took me back with them, where my wife met me.  We drove back to DC (we lived then at 22nd and L Streets, NW).  An eerie feeling getting into the city, when so many were leaving.  The city was empty.  Outside our building was a humvee and soldiers holding machine guns. We went out for a walk, toward the Pentagon, saw the fire and smelled the smoke, saw more soldiers, walked near the State Department and White House, then returned home and watched TV the rest of the day and night.”

Slate’s Dave Weigel: “No great story here — I was in my parents’ house in Delaware, a few days before heading back to school. My granddad was watching TV while I was upstairs updating my HTML blog. He called me down, and then we watched TV, and then my mother called from a barber shop to ask if we were watching. We picked up my dad from his evacuated building, and later my friends who’d also gotten the day off hooked up with me for a trip to buy the new Dylan album. Returning from that, I updated my blog again.”

The Washington Examiner‘s Nikki Schwab: “Sept. 11, 2001 was a day of immense sadness, but for those of us living in Southwestern Pennsylvania, it was also a day of massive confusion. I was a senior in high school at the time, having lived in the small town of Ligonier, Pa., my entire life. After the World Trade Center had been hit in New York City my friend Brea ran into Ms. Barr’s jazz band homeroom and said, ‘We’re being attacked.’ We threatened a mutiny against music that morning and informed Ms. Barr that we wanted to watch CNN. She finally obliged. We watched the Twin Towers collapse and heard the news about the Pentagon. I always carried my cell phone, what we nicknamed ‘the contraband,’ to school even though it was against school rules. Using that phone my friends secretly called their parents from the instrument storage room. That’s when we found out about how close Flight 93 was to where we lived. My friends’ moms had seen the plane wobbling through the air before it finally came down about 30 miles away in Shanksville, Pa. At the time we didn’t know why one of the hijacked planes was flying through our backyards. Rumor on the street was that it was on its way to attack Pittsburgh. (Yeah, right). Now we know that it was the heroism of the passengers and flight attendants that most likely saved countless lives right here in D.C.”

AP’s Phil Eillott: “I was a junior at Ohio University on Sept. 11, 2001, and the managing editor of our independent student-run daily newspaper, The Post. It was our first week of publishing for the academic year and I was the late editor the day before. I was at the office until after 4 a.m., making sure the edition got to print by the 6 a.m. deadline. I was still asleep when the first tower was hit. An early editor called with few details to wake me. I was getting ready for work when a second phone call came in with news of a second plane. Not quite understanding what was going on, I made a quick stop at the bookstore to pick up a textbook on my way to The Post. By the time I arrived in the newsroom, the significance of what had happened started to sink in.”

HuffPost‘s Christina Wilkie: “I was an intern at The Brookings Institution, and I arrived at work just after the first tower was hit. Twenty of us crowded around a TV in the conference room as we tried to absorb what was going on. There was another new intern, Tracee, who had never been in a big city before and didn’t know where to go, so I took her with me and we walked up Massachusetts Ave in the middle of the street, 30 blocks to my house. We sat together, virtual strangers, for the next six hours.”

Politico‘s Keach Hagey: “I was in Manhattan, on my way to work. I ran into a friend coming out of the subway at 23rd St. who said, ‘Turn around.’ I looked down Broadway and saw the first tower fall. People were just standing in the middle of the street, screaming.” [Hagey was writing for non-profits at the time.]

C-SPAN’s Steve Scully: “I was on C-SPAN doing a segment on President Bush’s education agenda when I received a note about a plane hitting the first tower of the World Trade Center. It was approximately 8:47. The House was in at 9 a.m. so I was off the air at 9. I turned the corner and saw the 2nd plane hit the 2nd tower LIVE at 9:02. Then immediately mobilized because I knew, we knew, this is not just an accident. We stayed on air for days after that.”

ABC White House Correspondent Jake Tapper: “I was in my apartment in Adams Morgan trying to figure out what I would write about that day when my then-boss at Salon.com, Kerry Lauerman, called. He told me to turn on the TV. I did just as the second plane hit. No one knew what was happening. Kerry soon called again because there were rumors that the Mall was on fire. In reality, it was smoke from the Pentagon. I hopped on my bicycle to go check it out; I didnt want to have to worry about traffic. Rumors were swirling — there was a bomb at the State Department, a car bomb at Treasury. At the Mall, traffic was insane, cars were at a standstill. I ran into a friend, Ellen Gamerman, then of the Baltimore Sun. Car radios were blaring news and people would gather around to listen. I decided to get out of there and gave Ellen a lift on the bike. When we got near the White House, a panicky policeman told us to get out of there as soon as possible since there were reports that a fourth plane was headed to the White House. Right around then is when the towers started to fall. The whole world had changed. No one knew what to do. I called around and made sure everyone I knew and cared about in NYC and New Jersey was OK.  My little brother was living in Cairo, so there was a whole new worry I immediately adopted. I was glued to the TV for hours. No one knew
how many people had died. Peter Jennings was great that day. A friend of mine and I went to go give blood. We just needed to do something. We walked to the Red Cross but they were overwhelmed so they sent us away. I think all that blood ended up getting spoiled anyway. Kerry kept calling me to ask me what I was going to write. [Read the story here.] It wasn’t easy to write that day. Looking back on it, I’m amazed at how dispassionate the story seems. I was overwhelmed with grief. The next day I went to the Capitol — I
worked in the Senate Periodical Press Gallery — and called Gary Hart
and Warren Rudman, who had chaired a commission warning of a terrorist
attack. Their warnings had been ignored. That day I got angry. It was a weird time to be a reporter.”

WaPo‘s Aaron Blake: “Getting ready for my first day of college at the University of Minnesota. I still went to class for some reason. I think that’s proof that this didn’t set in right away.”

Poshbrood Travel Blog Founder and blogger Elizabeth Thorp: ” On 9-11, I had a plane ticket to fly from IAD to Denver around 11 am. I was Executive Director of the National Campaign for Hearing Health and we had a board meeting in Denver. A few colleagues had gone out Monday. I don’t love to fly (ironic, huh since I’m a travel writer and founder of travel website and consultancy Poshbrood?) My grandfather was killed in a small plane crash and I grew up in a family of nervous fliers. Almus and I had been married a year and lived in a condo near the Cathedral. I had gotten up early to exercise, had come back and was making coffee, reading the paper and watching the news. I was extra nervous about flying that day, just had a bad feeling and was dragging my feet. My insomniac mom called from LA around 8:30 a.m. and I told her I was going to Colorado but really didn’t want to fly…she said the weather’s great today, you’ll have a smooth flight! Later I was watching the Today Show (way pre-George on GMA which is our new morning show) and they broke in to say a small plane had it the Tower and showed the footage. I had been in the building recently for a client meeting and thought ‘the building is huge, there is no way that’s a small plane.’ I got online (dial up!) and checked to see how many other United flights there were to Denver as I didn’t want to head to the airport yet (but should by 9:30 am). There were more flights and I decided to wait a bit before heading to airport. I kept watching the TV and live (I remember it was Katie Couric and Al Roker talking) watched as the second plane hit the Tower. My blood ran cold and I knew something deliberate, horrible and evil was happening and it didn’t matter if I went to the silly board meeting or not. My husband came in from his run and he said he knew by my face something was very, very wrong. My parent’s called me to make sure I didn’t get on the plane (duh!) and several people thought I might be going to LA from IAD and couldn’t get through to me because lines were jammed. We watched live as Jim Miklaszewski reported an explosion at the Pentagon which was the other IAD plane and got a text that the rest of the office downtown at 17th and K were evacuating. We went to the roof of our condo and saw the plume of smoke at the Pentagon and I couldn’t get my head around the malicious evil of “people” who would deliberately crash a plane of innocents. I still can’t. We then started hearing about the PA plane crash and acquaintances or classmates who were in planes or the Tower. I cried and watched TV all day. In the afternoon, I walked over to the Cathedral with our dogs and met some nice out of town visitors. They were seeking comfort because a colleague of theirs had been on the flight that went into the Pentagon. It was so very sad. Still is. I have my unused 9-11 plane ticket somewhere in a box of keepsakes. After that day for awhile I was always given extra searches, pulled out of line and had bags searched. Even when 8 months pregnant! Maybe because I was flying on 9/11?”

Roll Call‘s Paul Singer: “I was the head of AP’s bureau in Cleveland — we were in our statewide morning news conference call when the second plane struck, and everybody just said ‘Well, OK, scrap everything else we were planning’ and hung up. Shortly thereafter we got an alert that there was a hijacked plane with a bomb aboard that was being forced to land at the Cleveland airport. Apparently flight 93 was on the same flight path as another plane headed west, and there was air traffic confusion as they passed into Ohio (the regional FAA station is in Oberlin). Flight 93 did a buttonhook and went down in Shanksville; the other plane was sent to land in Cleveland. The airport is about 15 miles out of town, but the mayor decided to evacuate downtown Cleveland. It’s a small city with a few major roads and bridges which all instantly became parking lots with panicked people trying to flee. The mayor held a press conference and I had to basically climb over cars to traverse the four blocks from the AP bureau to city hall. I had taken the Cleveland job in May and I am pretty sure that the ‘hijacked plane/bomb/evacuation’ series was my first experience filing an URGENT series for the AP; I had no idea what codes to use or what format. I had our veteran sportswriter standing behind me basically dictating to me while I hammered on the keyboard. It was very nearly Sept. 12 before I was finally at my neighborhood bar with a drink in my hand watching reruns of the collapsing towers over and over again, and wondering what we had just lived through.”

The Daily Caller‘s David Martosko: “I was on my way up I-395 on my way to work in DC, listening to the radio with my wife Susan — who had a dentist appointment downtown that morning, when Flight 11 hit the North tower. By the time we made it to my office, the Pentagon had just been struck. It took me two hours to get to my where Susan was, just 6 blocks away. She was waiting on the curb since the dentist’s building had been evacuated. We spent another four hours in the car trying to cross the 14th Street Bridge. Eventually, when the bridge was opened to (outgoing only) traffic, we made our way home. Along the way we offered to pick up several people who said they were too scared to go underground into the Metro tunnels. I learned later on that some of my co-workers had gotten home to Virginia much faster by abandoning their cars and walking. As luck would have it, I was due for a blood donation — I had been giving a pint every two months since high school, since my own life was saved by an emergency transfusion when I was very young. I stood in line that night at a Red Cross donor center in Arlington, along with dozens of others. Many were first-time blood donors.  There simply wasn’t much else we could do at that point. Susan and I had  several lunches and dinners at the Afghan restaurant on Route 1 in Alexandria, since the owners had (literally overnight) covered the building’s roof-eaves with red, white, and blue bunting. It was the first of many signs that our neighbors of Middle Eastern descent would suddenly have to work twice as hard to demonstrate their love of country, and that they would need our support. The only other thing I remember vividly about that day was holding on to Susan, and she to me, and wondering if World War III had just begun.

A special note of thanks to all who responded.

Chuck Todd: ‘Al Roker Can Stuff It’

MSNBC’s Savannah Guthrie appeared on “The Daily Rundown” this morning alongside co-host Chuck Todd and told viewers she was moving on. The network officially announced the news Monday morning.

Todd’s reaction? Territorial. He even took a shot at NBC “Today” Show weatherman Al Roker, saying, “Al Roker can stuff it right now. We’ve got you for another month.” Roker, whose ears were apparently burning all the way from Mississippi, later appeared on the show in his weatherman flood gear. He was up to his waist in water.

After Roker reported on the flooding, Todd expressed rage toward the weatherman. “Alright Roker, I’ve got issues with you,” he said. Roker fired back twice, “What, because I’m taking Savannah from you? What, because I’m taking Savannah from you?”

Todd: “Let’s just say you’re just Roker to me now, Roker.”

Roker blamed facial hair discrepancies for Savannah’s departure. “Here’s the thing, Savannah likes her men clean shaven,” Roker said, belting out big, continuous laughter.

A Young David Gregory Shows off Red Hair and Freckles

NBC’s “Today” Show played an embarrassing game of show and tell on Friday by showing school pictures of the hosts.

“My little girl who is at school now, she will not smile, not even on the retakes, she refuses,” NBC “Meet the Press” host David Gregory told the other hosts that included Meredith Viera, Jenna Bush, Tamron Hall and Al Roker. Bush made fun of herself midway through the segment as a picture of her younger self with glasses appeared on screen. “I mean, okay, I can’t even take myself seriously,” she said as the others laughed.

Gregory went temporarily silent as his picture flashed on the screen. “Hey Freckles!” Roker shouted out. Gregory, who didn’t look overly thrilled to have the picture on display, remarked, “That’s Encino Little League. In the valley.” Bush razzed him, saying, “You were a ginger! You were a ginger! You look like a valley kid.”

Watch here on HuffPost from a post earlier today.

Afternoon Reading List 01.04.11

* Today’s advice column in The Daily Caller has it all. 1. Al Roker makes fun of Tucker Carlson for saying Michael Vick should be executed. He questions the oxygen in Carlson’s brain and calls him “an idiot. ” In turn, the advice columnist suggests that ridiculing Tucker’s ancient bow tie-wearing ways is comparable to making jokes about Roker’s former fat physique since his stomach stapling. 2. Necrophelia 3. Bo Obama 4. Whoopi Goldberg.

* Politico‘s Patrick Gavin writes on Carlson’s “clarification” regarding Vick. Maybe “execution” was a little strong after all. Read full item here.

* A huge drama could unfold on Capitol Hill if congressional aide Aharon Freeman doesn’t unbind the chains and give his wife Tamara Epstein a divorce. NYT‘s Mark Oppenheimer tackles this fascinating piece about an Orthodox Jewish aide who won’t give his wife “a get.” Best line: “Like most marriages that end badly, this one began hopefully.”

‘Dynamite’ Karaoke: The Competition Blows Up

It’s incurable. The song is stuck in our heads — “I like to move move move move….Cause I told you once/I told you twice…”

Taio Cruz‘s “Dynamite” is now horrifyingly burned into our memories. But it’s not Cruz’s voice we hear — it’s Matt, Al, Meredith, Ann — and Ed. Earlier in the week, NBC’s Today Show hosts Matt Lauer, Al Roker, Ann Curry and Meredith Viera sung the tune. Of course some think their polished version pales in comparison to the recent live performance by CNN’s Senior White House correspondent Ed Henry. He belted out, let’s say, a brave, uninhibited performance, with his son and daughter at Capitol Karaoke at the Rock N Roll Hotel.

Henry offered an American Idol type critique of the NBC hosts: “It was a good effort by Matt, Meredith, Ann and Al but their cover version is just a little too slow tempo for my kids. The Today Show team should keep their day jobs because they can’t hold a candle – or a stick of Dynamite I guess – to my Mila and Patrick.”

Watch NBC’s performance here.

Morning Reading List 07.15.09

Good morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Happy Birthday to Arianna Huffington and Paul Kane! What we know and what we’re reading this Wednesday morning…

TV | ONLINE | AWARDS | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

Arthur Sulzberger and NYT Co. CEO Janet Robinson have issued a memo to the newsroom about the company’s debt, and explains the steps that the company is taking to ensure its ability to pay back approximately $1.1 billion to creditors.

TV

Cable ratings from TVNewser: Fox News Channel ranked at #3 in prime time and #6 in Total Day in all of all of cable last week.

And from 10am-3pmET Monday, when the Sonia Sotomayor confirmation hearings were ongoing, Fox News was the most-watched network for coverage. FNC even beat CNN and MSNBC combined, in younger viewers during that time period. Check out the numbers here.

Also, Evening News ratings.

Both Al Roker and Willie Geist will be getting up even earlier– starting July 20th, Roker will host “Wake Up With Al” on the Weather Channel from 6-7amET and starting July 27th, Geist will host “Way Too Early” on MSNBC from 5:30-6:00amET.

ONLINE

HuffPost comes to Dan Froomkin‘s defense, pointing out that Nielsen numbers suggest he wasn’t the only one at WaPo to lose some audience online.

AWARDS

Nominations for the 30th Annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards were announced yesterday. PBS picked up the most nominations with 41. CBS News followed with 23; ABC News has 13; NBC 10; CNN 8; BBC America with 3; and MSNBC has 2. “60 Minutes” leads all shows with 15 nominations. “World News with Charles Gibson” has the most nominations for the evening newscasts with 7; “Nightly News with Brian Williams” picks up 5, including for Breaking News coverage of the death of Tim Russert; and the CBS “Evening News with Katie Couric” has 3 nominations, including for Couric’s “Campaign Questions” series during the 2008 election. More details via TVNewser.

NEWS NOTES

More on Judge Sotomayor’s confirmation hearings in Howard Kurtz‘s Media Notes today.

WEST WING REPORTAGE

Politico points out the proposed WaPo “salons” wouldn’t have violated White House ethics rules.

HAT TIPS: mediabistro, Politico

THE REVOLVING DOOR and JOBS after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 01.20.09

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Happy Inauguration Day Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Today is the birthday of Sam Dealey. Yesterday was the birthday of Ann Compton, Robert MacNeil and New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller. Check out the TamCam’s photos from The Root party and Mark Knoller‘s invaluable “Bush presidency by the numbers.” Washington Monthly has some suggestions on “What Obama Should Read.” Check out the recommendations here. The New York Times provides a game plan for “36 Hours in Washington, D.C.” Amazon’s Newsstand Blog shows us “a few of the newest entries into the Obamamania group of magazine covers.” TV Anchor Babes looks at “A Hot Norah O’Donnell on The Late Late Show.” Viva Chuck Todd tells us, “Chuck Todd Valentine’s Day e-Cards Now Available!” Check out today’s White House Photo of the Day from Time. Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “It found it rather ironic when the company, after laying off 20 people and announcing there will be no raises, distributed the United Way pledge cards and asked us to give.”

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • This week’s mediabistro.com classes include Intro to Magazine Writing, Health and Medical Writing and Writing and Editing for the Web.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Portfolio contributing editor Matt Cooper has joined Talking Points Memo as the site’s new editor-at-large. There, he will be covering the White House — a job he’d done previously at Time and Newsweek — and helping to launch TPM’s new politics blog, TPMDC.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Bloomberg reports, “Newspapers that scrambled to print extra issues after Barack Obama‘s election are ramping up presses to ensure they don’t miss out on an inauguration day windfall.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The embattled New York Times Co., trying to wriggle out from under a pile of debt as advertising revenue dries up, is talking to Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim about making a sizeable cash investment in the company.”

  • Big Think reports, “The founder of the Huffington Post blog says old media can survive.” Check out the video here.

  • Jeff Jarvis‘ Buzz Machine reports, “The World Association of Newspapers and the World Editors Forum just canceled their annual convention, which had been scheduled to take place in India in only two months”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “WaPo adding to White House team”

  • The Daily Cartoonist has a round-up of “Cartoonists covering the Obama Inauguration”

  • Matt Taibbi takes on porn-stached New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman‘s greenish ways.”

  • Ann Althouse writes, “Oooooh! Maureen Dowd goes to some Florida spa, and, I ask you: Was anything ever more ready-made for Stuff White People Like?”

  • Larry Kramer writes, “Newspapers are still the best-staffed news organizations and remain journalism’s brightest hope — if they can only break their addiction to print.”

  • FamousDC reports, “CQ Today: Correction, We Meant Public Not Pubic”

  • “The Gannett Company, publisher of 85 daily newspapers across the United States, is making all its employees take a weeklong unpaid furlough to avoid layoffs.” The Onion asks, “What do you think?” Check out some responses here.

  • Political Animal reports, “Barack Obama stopped by the Washington Post’s offices yesterday and covered a lot of ground with reporters and editors. There was one subject of particular interest — the Post’s front-page headline read: ‘Obama Pledges Entitlement Reform.’”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone asks, “Will WaPo close Book World?”

  • The Corner reports, “Somewhere along the way, Bob Woodward decided to transition from being a newspaper reporter to a Big Thinker. We see evidence of this in Woodward’s piece in the Washington Post ‘Outlook’ section, ’10 Take Aways From the Bush Years,’ in which Woodward informs us that ‘There’s actually a lot that President-elect Barack Obama can learn from the troubled presidency of George W. Bush.’ Rather than bore Cornerites with a point-by-point rejoinder, it might be instructive to take just one of Woodward’s ten take-aways and examine it with a bit of care.” For more, click here.

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    TV

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “Own a piece of history with this two DVD set commemorating the inauguration of Barack Obama. This special DVD set will include highlights from Inauguration Day 2009 and a compilation of Barack Obama’s speeches delivered on his road to the White House. The DVDs will contain nearly eight hours of programming. The speech compilation features Barack Obama’s 2004 Democratic National Convention address, his speech on race relations, the 2008 convention address, his election night victory remarks, and more. The inaugural highlights DVD will capture events from Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration, including the traditional arrival of the president-elect at the White House, the departure to the Capitol, and the complete inaugural ceremony. Pre-order the two disc collection for $19.95 online now.”

  • A release announced, “As part of ABC’s Presidential Inauguration coverage on January 20 ABCNEWS.com will live stream the ABC TV network’s special coverage beginning at 9:30AM EST/6:30AM PT. The comprehensive reporting will be embedded directly on ABCNEWS.com’s Homepage. Charles Gibson, Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos will anchor coverage of Barack Obama‘s Inauguration. Broadcast from the Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue, coverage will include all events from the swearing-in ceremony and Obama’s Inaugural Address to the Inaugural Parade, as well reaction from around the nation and the world to this historic event. Gibson, Sawyer and Stephanopoulos will be joined by a team of ABC News anchors, correspondents and analysts covering the day’s events. The live streaming coverage, the first of its kind to be directly embedded on the Homepage, will be presented in 16 x 9 widescreen format and will be available on some ABC Affiliate stations’ websites.”

  • Johnny Dollar’s Place writes, “With six showings of Hannity into the record books, it’s clear that the original debate concept of Hannity & Colmes has been abandoned. Now Sean interviews like-minded folk who won’t challenge his points: Jonah Goldberg, Pat Buchanan, Fred Thompson, Elizabeth Hasselbeck, etc. Oh there was an interview with Don Imus (neither conservative nor a Republican) but it was a celebrity-style chat, barely touching on any political issues. This is all straight out of the playbook of Keith Olbermann. Or for that matter Rachel Maddow who, aside from an infrequent appearance of Buchanan, also proffers a parade of ideological soulmates.”

  • The New York Times reports, “When the White House changes occupants this week, it may also change channels. Barack Obama‘s inauguration on Tuesday marks the end of an era for the Fox News Channel, the cable news network of choice during the George W. Bush years.”

  • A Livestation release announced, “Our partner channels have lined up special inauguration coverage which you can flick between in your Livestation player to sample the different perspectives being offered. Livestation chat lets you interact with other viewers and some of the programme producers who might send your comments through to the studio to be read out and discussed live on air. To take part in a discussion you need to have your Livestation player open, click the downward pointing arrow at the top of the screen and enter the chat room.” For more information, click here.

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens reports, “John King Gets 1/6th of CNN Sunday”

  • WUSA reports, “As the nation looks forward to a historic inauguration, 60 years ago Friday night another historic inauguration took place. That’s when Channel 9, ‘Washington’s Eye on the World,’ began regular television service as the new CBS affiliate.”

  • Time reports, “Barack Obama wasn’t the only winner to emerge from last year’s historic presidential race. Chuck Todd has surged to TV prominence and Beltway influence since being tapped as NBC’s political director in 2007. For millions of NBC and MSNBC viewers, Todd’s analysis of election arcana, especially during the drawn-out Democratic primary, was an invaluable guidebook on the campaign trail. Recently named NBC’s chief White House correspondent, Todd has written a book on the race along with NBC’s Sheldon Gawiser, How Barack Obama Won. He spoke with TIME about where the media’s election coverage went wrong, how bloggers make him nicer and why his famed facial hair isn’t going anywhere.” Check out the full interview here.

  • Did you catch it? That was Al Roker broadcasting live from the plaza outside of NBC News at 400 N. Capitol Street on Monday.

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “Do you want to know what Fox News’ Megyn Kelly ate last week? She gives a detailed account to NYMag.com’s Grub Street blog.”

  • Mark your calendars. The 65th Annual Radio & Television Correspondents’ Dinner will be held on Thursday, June 4th, 2009 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington.

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens reports, “Blitzer: We Have ‘Some New Technology.’ Cooper: ‘Is This A Hologram?’”

  • Yesterday, NBC News’ Matt Lauer was the first to sit down live with Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III, in his first interview since he piloted the crash landing of US Airways Flight 1549 on the Hudson River in New York City. The interview aired on “Today,” Monday, January 19.

  • WTOP reports, “A Prince George’s County jury has reached a verdict in the case of a reporter who sued the county. A jury has found Prince George’s County Police used excessive force when they detained Channel 7 investigative reporter Andrea McCarren.”

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens reports, “Juju Chang Goes Guerilla Journalist For Inauguration”

  • A release announced that CNN replayed Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech in its entirety on Monday, Jan. 19, at noon (ET) as part of the network’s MLK Day programming.

  • Check out TVNewser’s Live Chat with Chuck Todd.

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “MSNBC held their Television Critics Association panel yesterday in Los Angeles, and the questions ranged from comparisons of MSNBC and FNC to comparisons of Obama and Bush. Variety’s Brian Lowry writes that MSNBC president Phil Griffin fielded questions about the network’s ‘windshield-wiper act’ of having Keith Olbermann and Chris Matthews again anchoring political coverage, Tuesday at the Inauguration, as well as whether MSNBC was the ‘left-leaning counterweight’ to Fox News. ‘We’re less about ideology than Fox is,’ said Griffin.”

  • WorldScreen.com reports, “Jeff Zucker, the president and CEO of NBC Universal, will be a keynote speaker at Media Summit New York, set to be held March 18 and 19. The 6th Annual Media Summit New York, presented by The McGraw-Hill Companies — the publishers of BusinessWeek — and produced by Digital Hollywood, is set for March 18 to 19 at the McGraw-Hill Building in New York.”

  • TVNewser’s Chris Ariens ponders, “What’s the State of Reliable Sources?”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “CNN President Jon Klein didn’t go light on the praise for John King this afternoon, shortly after the premiere of his new show, ‘State of the Union.’ King, he said, is ‘the best political reporter of his generation.’”

  • Reuters reports, “ABC feeling economic, digital pressures”

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “Where To Watch The Obamas’ First Dance? ABC Only, For Now”

  • His Extreme-ness points us to this exchange spotted by Matthew Yglesias at Think Progress.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • A release announced, “For those who may not plan to visit Washington D.C. for the Inauguration, C-SPAN will debut Inauguration Hub on January 20th. C-SPAN’s Inauguration Hub features an online ‘control room’ that includes a Mogulus designed multichannel grid to webcast the inauguration activities. Visitors can access the Inauguration Hub at www.c-span.org, between 6:00 AM (ET) and Midnight (ET) on Inauguration Day.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Can CNN, the Go-to Site, Get You to Stay?”

  • ABC NewsNOW is livestreaming the coverage online through Tuesday — covering all the events, with Rick Klein and Sam Donaldson anchoring. Check it out here.

  • OJR reports, “Journalism ethics 2.0: As the Internet changes the market, some conventions must change as well”

  • washingtonpost.com will be offering live video coverage of the Inauguration and mobile alerts to anyone who will be in D.C. to help them avoid the expected gridlock.

  • A release announced, “CNN Worldwide plans to create the most unique view of the exact moment U.S. President-elect Barack Obama takes the oath of office on Tuesday, Jan. 20, at noon (ET). Using Microsoft Photosynth technology, CNN and Microsoft Corp. will produce the first ‘synth’ of a major historical moment. Photosynth, part of the Microsoft Virtual Earth product family, enables users to create synths, detailed 3-D environments of photos that are identified by minute similarities and then fused together. In this case, the initial images comprise those captured on cell phones, cameras and mobile devices by inauguration attendees of the moment Obama is sworn in as president. From the vast sweep of the crowd to a close-up on the new president’s raised hand, every angle of this historic moment will be frozen in time. To see examples of synths, visit http://photosynth.com. CNN is inviting people witnessing ‘The Moment’ to take part in a special iReport assignment by e-mailing their pictures to themoment@CNN.com.”

  • CNN reports, “Obama poised to be first ‘wired’ president”

  • Chicago Reader reports, “Why Would a Pro Write for HuffPo? One freelancer explains why she’ll work gratis for a $200 million company”

  • Washington Flyer has joined Facebook! Become a friend here.

  • “MySpace has partnered with Katalyst Media, founded by Ashton Kutcher, on a project called The Presidential Pledge. Celebrities recorded videos in which they make a pledge of service to President-elect Barack Obama. The videos were directed, produced and edited by Demi Moore. The ultimate goal is to motivate the MySpace community to create their own pledges to help bring about the change inspired by Obama’s Campaign. … MySpace will have these videos exclusively beginning Monday 12:01am PT Jan.19. Users can watch the videos and create their own personal pledged at www.myspace.com/presidentialpledge. For more info, check out MySpace Celebrity.

  • Check out “Dear Mr. President,” where people can upload a video message to President-Elect Obama at Pepsi’s new site RefreshEverything.com.

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    MAGAZINES

  • The National Religious Campaign Against Torture urges readers to “Tell Newsweek No to Torture!”

  • Folio reports, “Hard-Hit Niche Publishers Rethink Strategies”

  • “This week The Atlantic devotes the homepage of TheAtlantic.com to its coverage of the inauguration. In addition to the latest dispatches and posts from writers including Andrew Sullivan, Marc Ambinder, Ta-Nehisi Coates and James Fallows, the site also features The Atlantic’s archival coverage of new presidencies reaching back to Abraham Lincoln.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The Popular Newsweekly Becomes a Lonely Category”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “Rachel Maddow has reached a new agreement with Air America Media (www.airamerica.com) to extend her tenure with the company’s Radio Network and Interactive Division. ‘The Rachel Maddow Show’ will air as a one-hour program to be presented in morning drive time on the network’s affiliates and streamed on airamerica.com.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert looks at, “The media myth about the cost of Obama’s inauguration”

  • JammieWearingFool reports, “Perino Mocks Obama”

  • A release announced, “Change.org … announced the winners of its Ideas for Change in America competition at an event at the National Press Club and attended by nonprofit leaders, grassroots activists, and members of the Obama campaign and incoming administration. The competition was the first nationwide grassroots response to President-elect Barack Obama‘s call for greater citizen participation in government, and since Election Day more than 650,000 votes have been cast for more than 7500 ideas for how the Obama administration and 111th Congress should change America. The 10 winning ideas reflect the diverse interests of the millions of people calling for change across the country, including ideas for securing universal heath care, LGBT rights, and sustainable green energy. The list of winners also includes ideas often left off of the national agenda but with powerful grassroots support, including those for restoring civil liberties, ending the prohibition on medicinal marijuana, and advancing peace through new government institutions. All winning ideas can be viewed at www.change.org/ideas.”

  • Sam Dealey looks at “Racial Media Bias Meets Liberal Media Bias”

  • The Society of Professional Journalists is introducing the Journalists Toolbox. “With more than 10,000 listed Web resources and links, this site is a one-stop destination for any reporter or editor working on any story or beat, from crime to the environment to religion. This free site, edited by former Los Angeles Times reporter and DePaul University instructor Mike Reilley, is organized by beats and industry topics such as Public Records, Investigative, Crime, Legal Issues, Federal Government, State Government, Elections, Science, Environment, Public Safety, Journalism Jobs and much more.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer reports, “Obama’s New Press Strategy — Soon to be the ‘one president at a time,’ he starts schmoozing the press.”

  • New York Magazine reports, “Christopher Hitchens Blames Torture on Common Americans, Demands ‘Tongue’ From Andrew Sullivan

  • Politico’s Ben Smith reports, “A Democrat with knowledge of administration plans emails over the assignments for the Obama White House press shop, which looks more or less like the campaign press shop, perhaps on the principal of not tinkering with what works.”

  • A release announced, “Boston University today launched the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NECIR), the nation’s first university-based, multimedia investigative reporting collaborative focused on local and regional issues.”

  • AFP reports, “For White House aides, a ride off into an uncertain sunset”

  • Innovation in College Media has a round-up of “Student media covering the inauguration.”

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    JOBS

  • Association for Financial Professionals is looking for a Director, Communications.

  • The National Recreation and Park Association is looking for a Managing Editor for Park & Recreation Magazine.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Marketing/Circulation Manager.

  • AAAS is looking for an Art Associate.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, Michael Calderone, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext, Mic Check Radio, New York Times’ On This Day

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