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Posts Tagged ‘Alberto Ibarguen’

Panelpalooza: Upcoming Panels

A couple panels of possible interest tonight and tomorrow:

Tonight at 7:00 in George Washington University’s Jack Morton Auditorium, the school will sponsor a discussion called “Democracy and Public Argument: Where We Are and Where We Are Headed.” Speakers include NYT columnist Bob Herbert, founding partner of Engage communications Mindy Finn, GW professor and a former editor at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution Albert May, and Bud Ward, director of the Yale Forum on Climate Change and the Media.

Tomorrow morning at the Newseum, the International Women’s Media Foundation is sponsoring a panel moderated by PBS’s Judy Woodruff. The group will discuss the influence of social media on social causes, and will feature Bloomberg News editor-in-chief Matt Winkler, Alberto Ibargüen of the Knight Foundation, and Howard G. Buffett, the oldest son of Warren Buffett. The panel begins at 9:30 and will also be broadcast live here.

Then at 1:00, the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism’s director, Tom Rosenstiel, will participate in a discussion about Pew’s recently released “State of the News Media” report. It is the center’s eighth annual report on journalism. Frank Sesno, former CNN bureau chief and now School of Media and Public Affairs director at GW, will moderate. Also on the panel: Alberto Ibargüen, Executive Director of the Online News Association Jane McDonnell, and GW professor Matthew Hindman. The panel, hosted at GW, will be broadcast live online here.

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Morning Reading List 06.03.09

Good morning FishbowlDC! Happy Birthday to Mix 107.3′s Tommy McFly! Another Happy Birthday goes to Elizabeth Thorp, celebrating this weekend.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line. What we know and what we’re reading this Wednesday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | RADIO | ONLINE | MAGAZINES | NEWS NOTES | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

Graydon Carter in Vanity Fair on newspapers, “The Paper Chase”: My suggestion to newspapers everywhere is to give the public a reason to read them again. So here’s an idea: get on a big story with widespread public appeal, devote your best resources to it, say a quiet prayer, and swing for the fences.

TV

The first NBC special “Inside the Obama White House” aired last night. As the president and Brian Williams were driving to get burgers, Williams asked President Obama whether when he’s watching cable TV and lands on a news channel and sees a debate underway about him, does he stop and watch? An interesting answer from the President– “I generally don’t. Mainly because I don’t find most of the cable chatter very persuasive. I’ve used this analogy before, it feels like WWF wrestling. Everybody’s got their role to play. I know a lot of these guys. And if Pat Buchanan is having a conversation with Chris Matthews or talking to Keith Olbermann, everybody’s got their set pieces and, so, I don’t feel as if I’m learning anything from the debate.”

CNN’s Campbell Brown returned from maternity leave Monday to her regular 8 p.m. EST timeslot. The show had a new name, a new look, a new EP, and, perhaps most notably, a new opening: The show has dropped “No Bias, No Bull” from the title. More at TVNewser.

RADIO

NPR’s Diane Rehm will receive the AAUW/NASPA Women of Distinction Award at the University of Maryland on Thursday at the 2009 National Conference for College Women Student Leaders. Other honorees listed here.

ONLINE

Politico’s Mike Allen is switching to Saudi time with the President. His widely read Playbook was out at about 5:30am today.

MAGAZINES

Stephen Colbert to guest edit Newsweek? True. NYO: Since Newsweek’s redesign, the magazine’s editors have sent out a statement that they intend to sever any and all connection to the turgid, dusty newsweekly of yore. And for the next issue that hits newsstands on June 8, Comedy Central funnyman Stephen Colbert will be Newsweek’s guest editor.

From Playbook today: The American Society of Magazine Editors “Best Cover Contest” for 2009 includes among its 10 categories: “Best Obama Cover (featuring President Barack Obama).”

NEWS NOTES

Forbes asks can Knight Foundation head Alberto Ibarguen save the news business? “Ibarguen is directing a multi-year plan to spend $100 million on 130 projects dedicated to new media and the future of news. They range from projects on community-financed reporting and media “test kitchens” at universities to a new journalism institute in India.”

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro

REVOLVING DOOR and JOBS after the jump…

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Interest in Journalism Not “In Crisis,” Business Model May Be

Four of journalism’s most influential executives- AP President Tom Curley, NPR President Vivian Schiller, CNN President Jon Klein and Knight Foundation President Alberto Ibarguen- joined panel host Marvin Kalb at the National Press Club last night to discuss “Journalism in Crisis.”

The good news is they say the public’s interest in news has not waned, but that the business model newspapers have operated under is now obsolete.

Check out the AP’s coverage here.

Journos Gather at Ritz for RTNDF First Amendment Dinner

Last night was the First Amendment Awards Dinner at the Ritz Carlton, the 19th annual hosted by RTNDF.

The dinner was emceed by MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, who started by thanking his wife Kathleen (away on a skiing trip), his “ambassador to the human race.” He also thanked Rod Blagojevich, Sen. Roland Burris and Rahm Emanuel for producing numbers for Hardball and MSNBC. (A dinner guest points out to us that Matthews was still wearing his Hardball makeup.)

CNN’s Jack Womack presented the first award of the evening to colleague Susan Grant, the First Amendment Service Award. Grant joked she was sure “the board had run out of deserving journalists.”

ABC’s Charlie Gibson and Sam Donaldson brought a comedy act to present the Leonard Zeidenberg Award to Cokie Roberts. Some of their back-and-forth… Charlie: “Get your hands off me… I’m somewhat perturbed I have to share the podium with Sam.” Sam: “Women like older men- that’s me,” and Charlie: “Much older.”

Donaldson introduced a story about Roberts saying, “you can check this story, though I wouldn’t, it’s a good story,” to which Gibson replied, “like most of Sam’s stories.” Donaldson went on to tell about the time on the This Week with David Brinkey that John Tower asked what a womanizer was and Cokie looked at him and said, “I think most women know it when they see it, Senator.”

At her last dinner, RTNDF President Barbara Cochran honored the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation with a special award, which was accepted by Alberto Ibarguen. To much applause, Cochran called prompt freeing of detained journalist Roxana Saberi in Iran.

And the last award of the evening was presented to Google’s Chairman and CEO Eric Schmidt by PBS’s Judy Woodruff, as the whole room pondered, what would we do without Google?

In attendance: Dana Perino, CNN’s newly acquired State of the Union EP Michelle Jaconi, sitting next to Gloria Borger, who received a warm hello from Linda Douglass, Rome Hartman deep in conversation with Sam Donaldson at the cocktail hour, Mike Allen blackberrying away outside the Ritz, Lara Logan back from maternity leave, Google’s Bob Boorstin, Mark Whitaker with new deputy bureau chief Antoine Sanfuentes, David Bass, Emily Heil, Karen Travers and so on.

Morning Reading List, 04.15.08

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Happy Tax Day Washington. Playbook tells us that “Patrick Henry, Ed’s son, is 7.” Here’s your TV coverage of the Pope’s visit. Here’s the full text of Sen. John McCain’s remarks to the AP annual meeting yesterday. Sen. Hillary Clinton speaks today. And be sure to check out TVNewser’s ongoing coverage of the 2008 NAB-RTNDA conference in Las Vegas.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • You think Obama’s bitter comment was totally overblown.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because I just had a great job interview at a paper that has an actual functioning newsroom, with good editors who get to the root of the community’s problems. So, why am I angry? They can’t afford to pay me as much as the crappy paper I’m working at now. Damn IT!”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported on Saturday, “Caroline H. Little stepped down yesterday as chief executive and publisher of Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive (WPNI), the company announced.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe reports, “The Internet is up, the newspaper business is down, so no one would expect the top people at the Washington Post Company to be pulling down tens of millions of dollars a year like their counterparts in finance and entertainment. But they’re not suffering. According to 2007 filings, here are paychecks for the three best-paid Posties and their boss.”

  • Bernstein: what makes good journalism

  • British Journalist for CBS Freed in Iraqi Army Raid

  • My Wall Street Journal Editor: WSJ Officials ‘Pretty Thin-Skinned‘”

  • After 18 years as founding editor of ForbesLife, Christopher Buckley has decided to move into the role of editor at large in order to focus more on his writing.”

  • US military to free AP photographer

  • Writers Vs. Editors: A Battle for the Ages

  • The AP reports, “As newspaper publishers build up their online operations and struggle through an advertising slump, one group is worried about being left behind — the folks who make printing presses and other equipment used to make newspapers.”

  • Time for New Blood in Newspaper Boardrooms: A Slate

  • E&P reports, “U.S. daily newspapers shrank their newsrooms by 2,400 journalists in the past year, a 4.4% workforce decrease that’s the biggest year-over-year cut in ranks since the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) began conducting its annual census 30 years ago.”

  • A Second Opinion of David Brooks

  • Romenesko has a memo from the Post’s Frank Ahrens: “After our big Pulitzer win on Monday, there was some melancholy around the newsroom along the lines of, ‘Oh, this will be the last year this kind of thing will happen.’ I said just the opposite. I bet the Big Three — us, the Times and the Journal — will most likely increase our dominance of the Pulitzers in coming years. Why? Because it’s the mid-sized papers that have been/will be so hard-hit by cuts they will no longer be able to produce Pulitzer-caliber journalism.” And, Los Angeles Times’ Peter Spiegel responds: “Frank Ahrens is an old friend of mine, so I hate to disagree with him in public, but I feel the need to defend my employer’s honor. I’m not sure where he gets the idea that the Washington Post, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are ‘the big three’ of American newspaper journalism.”

  • The Editors Weblog reports, “San Jose Mercury News designer Martin Gee has posted a photo documentary of the effects of several rounds of layoffs and buyouts in his California newsroom.”

  • Washington Post’s Dan Steinberg reports, “TK Continues to Win Argument Against Nobody”

  • Daily Campello Art News reports, “Norfolk newspaper The Virginian-Pilot sponsors an annual Student Gallery competition hosted at the Chrysler Museum of Art. The top awards were announced a couple of weeks ago at the Chrysler Museum of Art, where works by the contest’s 62 finalists are on display. Erin Ayres ‘Unveiled Tokens of Lonely and Deserted Past,’ was among two works that earned her the $1,000 first-place award. Now the controversy part… Teresa Annas, art critic for the same newspaper courageously writes that: This year’s top winners resulted from a third round of judging. The first two jurors selected nude artworks for first place. Those judges were Aaron De Groft, director of the Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, and Scott Howe, director of education and public programs at the Chrysler Museum. The Virginian-Pilot, the contest’s main sponsor, declined to honor those choices.”

  • Business Week reports, “Who Rupert Murdoch Had On Speed Dial. … Among a list understandably studded with News Corp executives and operating heads, it’s interesting to find New York Post editor (and longtime Murdoch confidant) Col Allan.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Jack F. Patterson, a hard-nosed newspaper executive who guided The Washington Post to unprecedented circulation growth from the 1950s to the 1980s and who mentored generations of the paper’s top administrators, died April 9 of melanoma at his home in Bethesda. He was 93.”

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt explores “The Blur Between Analysis and Opinion”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell asks, “The Washington Post was awash in Pulitzer Prizes last week — six of them, the most ever for The Post. In the world of newspaper journalism, Pulitzers are the pinnacle. But the prizes are awarded by journalists to journalists. Do they mean anything to readers, especially in this perilous time of newspaper contraction?”

  • Ben Pershing’s Player of the Week is Sen. Robert Byrd. “And, at 90 years old and in increasingly poor health, he is the chairman of one of the most important committees in Congress. The headline news on Capitol Hill this week was about Iraq, housing and the Colombia free trade agreement. But below the surface, a crucial subplot was unfolding in the Senate, as Byrd’s Democratic colleagues cautiously began discussing whether he should continue to chair the Appropriations Committee. On Tuesday, about 15 key Senate Democrats discussed at a private meeting whether Byrd would be able to handle the upcoming Iraq supplemental bill, according to a Roll Call story (subscription required). That initial media report sparked a flurry of subsequent and sometimes contradictory stories in the Capitol Hill press. The Politico got several Senate Democrats saying — publicly, at least — that they support Byrd. Roll Call came back with a report that Byrd was calling colleagues in hopes of saving his job. The Hill newspaper said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) was angling for Byrd’s post, though Leahy denied it. … What’s really going on here? Why is there so much confusion on the subject? There are two primary reasons: Senate collegiality and media skittishness.”

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    TV

  • Obama doesn’t commit to N.C. debate

  • Debating the Debate Usage Guidelines

  • A release announced, “WTTG FOX 5 has been awarded four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards by the Radio-Television News Directors Association, including ‘Overall Excellence,’ announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. FOX 5 News also received awards in the ‘Best Newscast,’ ‘Investigative Reporting’ and ‘Videography’ categories.”

  • Ailes to B&C Hall of Fame

  • Newsweek asks, “Can news anchors like Katie Couric survive?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Indecency cases stuck in legal limbo at FCC”

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “The 2008 Media Research Center’s DisHonors Awards took place last night in Washington, D.C. and MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was (dis)honored with the ‘Quote Of The Year Award.’”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “CNN’s Wolf Blitzer isn’t just a newsman. He’s also a Washington sports nut, a regular at George Washington University men’s basketball games, a midcourt season ticket holder for the Washington Wizards, and big fan of the new Nationals baseball team. Lately, he’s tied both passions together, giving a Wizards pregame analysis from CNN’s Situation Room for the Verizon Center’s JumboTron. Now, he has his eyes on the Nats, whose new stadium boasts the biggest outfield TV ever. ‘I’d do it for the Nationals, too, but only if they want me,’ he tells us. ‘That’s a really big scoreboard.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Blogger Is Surprised by Uproar Over Obama Story, but Not Bitter

  • CJR’s Curtis Brainard reports, “A strange thing happened Tuesday. The New Republic had just launched a new ‘Environment & Energy’ blog on Sunday, and it had already hit a bump in the road. Just below the blog’s masthead was a small, green logo with the words, ‘Powered by BP.’ Within a day of the launch, TNR readers had begun to complain about irony of an oil giant (even one that has been trying to burnish its green credential for years) ‘powering’ (most assumed sponsoring) a blog about issues such as climate change and the development of renewable fuels. Just as I was reading the blog’s inaugural posts and its readers’ comments I refreshed the page and, lo and behold, the controversial BP logo had disappeared.”

  • The AP reports, “As people turn increasingly to the Internet for their news, there is concern whether they are learning enough about what goes on in their communities. With ‘the thinning down of newspapers and local television in America, there is measurably less local, civic information available,’ said Alberto Ibarguen, president and chief executive of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. ‘So what are the consequences of that?’ The foundation and the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, hope to find out.”

  • AdAge.com allows you to “Test Your Knowledge of Budget-Conscious News Ops and More in Media Guy’s Media-Studies Quiz”

  • PaidContent.org reports, “Salon Media, the parent of Salon.com, has raised $1 million in equity financing by selling its stock, just in time as its money was running out, again. The note, which it issued on April 4, 2008, may be convertible at a future date into common stock of the company at a conversion price equal of $1.68, it said in an SEC filing. They bear interest at the rate of 7.5 percent per annum, payable semi-annually, in cash or in kind, and mature on March 31, 2012, the filing states. It will use the funds raised for working capital and other general corporate purposes, the company said.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • BIG MAGAZINE TITLES SEE AD PAGES DWINDLE DOWN IN Q1

  • toohotfortnr writes, “On Monday, THFTNR goes out of business and Attackerman rises to take its place. That means I have a limited amount of time to take this blog back to its essence: the beef with TNR. And I have one score in particular that I badly need to settle. The story of Snitching Ryan Lizza.”

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    RADIO

  • Washington City Paper reports, “The health problems that sidelined WTOP’s Mark Plotkin for more than three months have apparently been resolved–the man was back in the chair this morning on the Politics Program in fine old form”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Gridskipper takes a look at The Newseum.

  • Don’t forget, the NLGJA-DC Happy Hour is Thursday, April 17 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hotel Helix Lounge at 1430 Rhode Island Ave., N.W.

  • Washington Social Diary reports, “There are small parties and there are big parties, and there are parties that are huge. Washington’s newest monumental addition, the Newseum, gave itself an opening party the other night that was huge — so many (one count had it at 1800) that they had to stand in line. Men in black tie, women in evening dresses, getting checked off the guest list.”

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    JOBS

  • St. Mary’s Today is looking for a News Desk/Reporter Person.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext