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Posts Tagged ‘Alex Beam’

Morning Reading List, 08.19.08

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Good morning Washington.

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We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 04.09.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Joe Scarborough’s birthday! Also: Hugh Hefner and Jenna Jameson (why are we not surprised they share a day…thanks MicCheck). Also, on this day in 1865, Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you have broken a bone.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “My best friend was laid off, and she was the smartest person there. There was no good reason. It was ‘budgetary.’ I have no more faith in this industry.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The slow-drip continues…more WHCA news.

  • Pulitzer Day: Keller Brings Up ASME’s, Polks; WaPo Rager

  • Hillary Clinton (55%) finished narrowly behind Barack Obama (56%) in the race for press exposure last week. But a Clinton-centric narrative was the focus of the campaign coverage for March 31-April 6, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study.”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper readers agree with editors on the basics of what makes good journalism, but they are more apt to want looser rules for online conversations, a new study on news credibility has found.”

  • The Cornell Daily Sun reports, “Yesterday afternoon, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Nicholas D. Kristof delivered a lecture on the current human rights violations in Sudan and China’s controversial involvement in the continuation of the civil conflict. The New York Times columnist has visited the war-torn region of Darfur in Sudan on several occasions and urges the international community — especially Americans — to focus their attention on providing more aid, including political relief, in hope of ending the genocide.”

  • CJR’s Dean Starkman writes, “The big winner in yesterday’s Pulitzers? The investigation. Sure, The Washington Post won six. But newspapering’s highest—and most important—form won at least that many. Not only did our brothers and sisters upstairs on the Pulitzer Board award two investigative prizes, to Walt Bogdanich and Jake Hooker of The New York Times and to the Chicago Tribune staff for work on tainted medicine and consumer goods, an investigative thread ran through most of the major awards—including the Public Service award, given to The Washington Post staff for the work of Dana Priest, Anne Hull, and photographer Michel du Cille.”

  • Plain Dealer Columnist Ted Diadiun writes, “‘There is no patent on a good idea,’ an editor friend used to say. The pithy comment essentially summed up the source of most good newspaper stories: Other people.”

  • Dave Barry writes, “I’ve had many entertaining arguments with Gene on a wide range of issues, including which of us has a bigger oosik. (An oosik is the bone from the penis of a walrus. Gene and I each own one.) We’ve both won some arguments and lost some; neither of us, to my recollection, has ever been gracious about it. One of the running jokes that developed between us is that at some point in the argument, usually early, I will remind Gene that I have won a Pulitzer Prize, and he has not. I have used this particular argument — this is a conservative estimate — 119 million times. And Gene has never had a good answer for it. Until today. I am very pleased to report that Mr. Gene Weingarten has won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. Gene, congratulations on an honor that is well-deserved and overdue. I’m thrilled for you, and genuinely happy that I can never use that particular argument against you again.”

  • Check out yesterday’s chat with Pulitzer Prize-winner Gene Weingarten.

  • E&P’s Joe Strupp reports, “Inside Word at Pulitzer Announcement: Entries Down, But Online Up.” Also, E&P has a round-up of winners and their stories, including Steven Pearlstein, Gene Weingarten, Amy Harmon, David Umhoefer, The Chicago Tribune editors and Michael Ramirez.

  • AJR’s John Morton writes, “Shortsighted cutbacks pose a serious threat to the future of newspapers.”

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    TV

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer says, “Strategy Room Becomes Part of FNC Weekend.”

  • An ABC release announced, “‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ placed 1st among key demo viewers last week, tying NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ in the demo rating and share; both broadcasts averaged a 2.1/8 among Adults 25-54. Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ averaged 7.98 million, placing second. Compared to a year ago, ‘World News’ posted gains among key demo viewers, increasing 6%. Additionally, for the twelfth time in thirteen weeks, the ABC News broadcast won among Women 25-54, averaging a 2.4/9.’”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 31, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 8.267 million total viewers”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Disney’s Bob Iger Explains Why ABC Passed On CNN Outsourcing, Why Media Concentration Is ‘A Joke’”

  • Silver Spring-based Discovery unveiled to advertisers yesterday its celebrity-encrusted plans for the new cable network Planet Green — the Prius of programming. Planet Green rises like the phoenix from the ashes of Discovery Home at 6 p.m. on June 4.

  • Small cable firms protest

  • CBS layoffs signal a financial squeeze on TV stations

  • DCTRV reports, “NBC Washington started handing out Sony HD cameras to all network field crews on Thursday, 4/3. NBC currently has four HD edit suits available and plans on upgrading the microwave system to full HD by the end of the summer.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reuters reports, “Viral sensation Obama Girl and satirical political corruption fighters Swift Kids for Truth along with Web sites for the New York Times and National Public Radio (NPR) have been nominated for Webby awards.”

  • Britannica Blog reports, “We’ll launch our blog forum on ‘Newspapers & the Net’ with an excerpt from Nick’s book. Throughout this forum assorted writers, journalists, bloggers, and media scholars will discuss and debate the state of newspapers in the digital age. Some of the participants will address Nick’s ideas directly, and others will talk generally about the impact of new media on traditional avenues of publishing. Lively debate will occur along the way, and we welcome your input, your comments and perspectives, and encourage your participation in these discussions.”

  • PostGlobal launched a blog called “Pomfret’s China“. “It will be
    written by Outlook Editor of The Washington Post John Pomfret and will cover the political, economic, and cultural elements playing into China’s rise as a world power.” Also coming to washingtonpost.com is “Intel Dump” by Phillip Carter. His blog will explore issues of national security and intelligence relating to American diplomatic, military and economic power.”

  • “C-SPAN wants to know, ‘What issue in this election is most important to you, and why?’ Shoot a short video response to this question and post it on our YouTube page! Now through the eve of the Pennsylvania primaries, YouTube users and C-SPAN viewers can upload their video to the YouTube/C-SPAN webpage.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Atlantic Media, owner of The Atlantic and National Journal, is close to selling its controlling stake in 02138 magazine to Sandow Media, WWD has learned. A spokesman for Sandow confirmed that the deal was in its final stages, but said it had not closed.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Former MSNBC VP Tammy Haddad, now president of Haddad Media, has been named to the Folio: 40. An annual list of magazine industry ‘influencers and innovators.’ Haddad is honored for showing ‘the magazine world that producing compelling video content doesn’t have to be an expensive proposition.’ Hadded is working with Newsweek on their video ventures.”

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    RADIO

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio will broadcast from the Newseum during the grand opening festivities on Friday, 4/11. XM’s presidential election channel (XM-130) will be live from the new newsgathering museum on Capitol Hill from 11 AM to 4 PM. Also, DCRTV hears that former WMALer Chris Core, who now works for the POTUS channel, will emcee the opening from 7 AM to 9 AM Friday.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam writes, “Samantha Power didn’t get the memo! Nor, apparently, did retired John F. Kennedy School of Government — sorry, Harvard Kennedy School — professor Francis Bator. Both have been using the K-School’s ‘old’ name in communications of late. The Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, whose ‘discussion papers’ stare up at me from the bottom of my wastebasket, is still using the no-longer operative moniker, ‘John F. Kennedy School . . . etc., etc.’”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • The Washington Social Diary reports, “True to its nature, in this town the power lunch spots get ranked in hierarchical order. The top is the top, meaning the leading power dining room would be the White House ‘Mess.’ The name belies its quiet authority, sitting as it does in the West Wing basement, under the Oval Office, and across the hall from the ‘Sit Room.’”

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    JOBS

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for a Staff Reporter.

  • Bristol Herald Courier is looking for a Sports Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is seeking a Copy Editor, Health Line Group.

  • Patuxent Publishing Co. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • PBS Newshour is looking for a Desk Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 08.07.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • FairVote’s is holding an Upgrade Democracy video contest and inviting you to a short video answering the question: “If you could change anything you wanted about elections, what would our democracy look like?” For more info, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Time Warner’s weak second-quarter results prompted Pali Research analyst Richard Greenfield to release a blistering report on Thursday in which he called on the company’s board to shake up management and sell AOL. But it appears as if his opinion isn’t shared by his Wall Street colleagues.”

  • Why Do We Suck? and Other Questions Political Journalists Asked Themselves at YearlyKos

  • More ratings data from ABC’s Sunday GOP debate, over at TVNewser.
  • One Year Out From Olympics, A Test of Openness in Beijing

  • From the NYPost: “Ted Koppel has slashed the price of his suburban D.C. home almost in half. The Post’s Braden Keil reports the retired “Nightline” anchor is now asking $2.3 million for his 9,000-square-foot Potomac, Md., house after first listing it in May 2005 for $4.1 million.”

  • New York Magazine’s Robert Kolker reports, “Don Imus, it turns out, isn’t cooked. Far from it. Hiring Lenny Bruce’s lawyer—the veteran First Amendment attorney Martin Garbus—was the first step in what appears to be an increasingly likely if improbable comeback.”

  • Howard Kurtz weighs in on the first online debate.

  • The Nation’s Ari Berman reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s takeover of the Wall Street Journal this week is drawing the ire of some Democrats running for President. … But the Democratic frontrunner, Hillary Clinton, hasn’t said a peep. ”

  • MediaPost reports, “A recent study of America’s top 100 newspaper websites, entitled ‘American Newspapers and the Internet; Threat or Opportunity?’ by Bivings Research, noting that using the Internet to expand a newspaper’s reach is becoming more and more important, reports that ninety-two percent of America’s top 100 papers now offer video on their websites… a significant jump from 2006, where just 61 percent offered video.”

  • Mr. Magazine reports, “If the trend continues throughout the rest of the year, the total number of new magazine launches will set a record in terms of the percentage of decline in launches. The only hot activity last month was the heat index rather than the magazine launches. July new launches hit a record low equal to that of last February.”

  • CNETNews.com reports, “‘The hyperlink has changed everything,’ asserted Jarvis, who runs media criticism site BuzzMachine and political blog PrezVid. Citing the motto ‘do what you do best, and link to the rest,’ he said that news outlets can achieve new levels of efficiency through the ability to direct readers to click elsewhere for more information. In one sense, it’s the 21st-century equivalent of a newspaper running an Associated Press or Reuters wire story instead of assigning one of its own reporters to the task. On the other hand, the hyperlink is the foundation behind a phenomenon that’s purely Web 2.0: the news aggregator.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Drudge’s following is so large and loyal that he routinely can drive hundreds of thousands of readers to a single story, photo or video through a link on his lively compendium of the news. With media organizations competing fiercely for online audiences, the whims of Matt Drudge can make a measurable difference.”

  • Poynter reports, “Even Frank Rich of The New York Times, as well as the Washington Post, are interested in Drudge.”

  • AP reports, “In a move that might make some people scratch their heads, a loosely formed coalition of left-leaning bloggers are trying to band together to form a labor union they hope will help them receive health insurance, conduct collective bargaining or even set professional standards.”

  • Reuters reports, “Every U.S. presidential candidate has a Web site, of course, but when the top Democratic hopefuls were asked on Saturday whether they would appoint a White House blogger if elected, all of them said yes.”

  • Washington Post’s Jose Antonio Vargas reports, “Walking around McCormick Place during the weekend, it became clear that only a handful of the 1,500 conventioneers — bloggers, policy experts, party activists — are African American, Latino or Asian.”

  • His Extremeness reminds us “buying insurance in blackjack is a sucker’s bet.”

  • A tipster tells us that the Swampland event at Yearly Kos “was the ticket to have at Yearly Kos. We were at fire capacity and had a one person in, one person out policy. Line was 15 people deep at one point … I’m just saying.”

  • Boston Globe’s Alex Beam writes, “There was a curious detail in The New Yorker’s recent, none-wished-it-longer profile of real estate and media tycoon Mortimer Zuckerman. The longtime chairman of Boston Properties, Zuckerman writes a weekly column for U.S. News & World Report, which he owns.”

  • Washington Post’s Danna L. Walker explored whether a “a class of college students survive without iPods, cellphones, computers and TV from one sunrise to the next?”

  • The Newseum and the National Archives present, “50 Years After Little Rock: The Media and the Movement,” a panel at the National Archives on Thursday, August 23 at 6:30 p.m. The panelists include Washington Post’s Dorothy Gilliam.

  • A reader points our attention to Howard Kurtz’s profile on David Bradley, stating: “After reading it, Bradley reminds me of the Dan Snyder of journalism … always dreaming of which ‘free agent contract’ to go after, but never putting together a coherent plan on how it all meshes together.”

    Jobs

  • Argus Media is looking for Power, fuels, environmental markets
    reporters.

  • NPR.org is looking for a creative writer, editor and multimedia producer with daily news and online experience to help drive social-media projects and innovate new approaches for our radio programs on the Web.

  • Online Investment Publisher is looking for an Assistant Product & Marketing Manager.

  • Defense News is looking for a copy editor.

  • The News Virginian is looking for a Copy Editor/Page Designer.

  • Al Arabiya News Channel is looking for an intern.

  • Congressional Quarterly, Inc. is looking for a Web Editor/Writer, Editor for the Web Project Team, a Technical Journalist/Web Developer, an Editor, User Experience & Design and a Multimedia Web Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.21.07

  • The ladies have nothing to wear and the gents have no one to take. Hop to it kids!

  • An ABC release announced that “World News with Charles Gibson” was “the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers and Households” for the fourth time in six weeks. “Averaging 8.64 million Total Viewers and a 2.2/9 among Adults 25-54, ‘World News’ outperformed NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 320,000 Total Viewers. This marks ABC’s greatest advantage over NBC in more than eighteen months.”

  • An NBC release announced that “Nightly News with Brian Williams” won “the key demographic adults 25-34 during the week of March 12-16.” Season-to-date, “Nightly News” continues to top ABC and CBS in the key demographic adults 25-54.

  • Another NBC release announced that NBC News will be the first news organization to offer its network evening newscast, “NBC Nightly News” in High Definition beginning on March 26. In addition, NBC News Special Reports, including breaking news and political coverage will also be offered in Hi-Def.

  • C-SPAN’s Steve Scully visited Little Rock Monday to make an address at the Clinton Presidential Library about Campaign 08, and to offer his thoughts on Mike Huckabee’s presidential run.

  • Slate.com is launching a 2008 Political Futures database, which aims to harness the “wisdom of crowds” to forecast the outcome of 2008 U.S. Presidential and Congressional races. Slate will publish hourly updates of key data.

  • The PEJ News Coverage Index shows that the probe of fired U.S. attorneys dominated the news March 11-16.

  • Boston Globe’s Alex Beam reports that NPR is reaching out to younger listeners with “NPR Zack: A New Space for Younger Listeners.”

  • The AP is hiring a News Editor for National Security.

  • A reader asks, “Why would the Post discredit news photographers (including their own) covering Valerie Plame by calling them paprazzi?” Check out this.

  • Michel Richard,and his restaurant, Citronelle, are nominated for an Outstanding Chef Award. Richard is also nominated for a book award in the Cooking From a Professional Point of View category. Citronelle’s sommelier Mark Slater is nominated for Outstanding Wine Service as part of the James Beard Foundation Awards.

  • The Atlanta Journal-Constitution business section featured a story on Motto magazine, a national business publication that was co-founded by Wall Street Journal veterans Anita Sharpe and Kevin Salwen.

  • From a tipster: “I understand at least eight reporters and editors lost jobs last week at the Center for Public Integrity. What’s the story? Just curious.”

  • A reader notes: “Politico may have beaten Jeff Birnbaum by six days on lobbying, but was a month behind Bloomberg on campaign finance. Bloomberg on Feb. 9 ran a story on how corporate PACs were increasing their donations to Democrats, the same story Politico matched on March 20.”

  • Carroll County Times is hiring a Multi-Media Producer.

  • The Virginian-Pilot Media Companies is hosting a Style Weekly Journalism Career Fair in Richmond, Tuesday March 27 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

  • UCG is hiring a Medical Coding Reporter in Rockville, Maryland.

  • Business Financial Publishing is hiring a Freelance Technology Investments Writer.

  • Wonkette reports that their “call to action to get Mary Worth restored to her rightful place in the Washington Post” has “electrified and mobilized all of you.” Wonkette urges you to join the “Don’t Cancel Mary Worth Coalition.”

  • A reader comments regarding the Post’s new blog: “Yuki Noguchi is hot!”

  • DCRTV reports, “Righty political comic Dennis Miller’s new show won’t launch in the Washington radio market.”

  • A reader comments that the Washington Times Fishwrap blog “has really picked up since Pfieffer and Ward got on board.”

  • Hugh Hewitt’s Dean Barnett addresses the question of Politio’s tilt, and finds the real problem: “To date, there has been no evidence that a moderate site can draw eyeballs.”

  • From a reader: “‘Ms. Heard said Style has lagged behind the other sections online ‘due to the philosophy that the company adopted when our Web site was created — that hard news drives it.’ This is BS — Heard has proudly allowed her reporters not to do web-friendly stuff.”

  • Wonkette makes an interesting observation of Dana Milbank.

  • Another reader says, “Come on, Post.com. A photo gallery, a list of stories and a database of campaign finance info? Welcome to 1997.”