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Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Wikipedia. (See King’s Wikipedia entry here.)

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Hillary Clinton was “edgy” on “Meet”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “Gannett Co. Inc. has named the chief executive of online ad company PointRoll Inc. to be its new chief digital officer, as it seeks to expand its online operations. Chris Saridakis, who was named PointRoll chief executive after McLean-based Gannett acquired the company two years ago, will oversee digital operations at Gannett’s newspapers and television stations. He will report directly to Gannett chief executive Craig Dubow.”

  • J. Peter Freire is the new Managing Editor of The American Spectator. Freire first came to the Spectator as an intern and editorial assistant under a journalism fellowship from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The real Dowd scandal

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “Here’s what happened in New Hampshire: Reporters lost their natural skepticism and took what they thought was happening and projected it far past the facts. The experts were wrong, the polling a disaster. The Post, luckily, didn’t poll late in New Hampshire and wasn’t among those making a bad call.”

  • The Virginian-Pilot’s Joyce Hoffman writes, “Coming on board as public editor with the news that Landmark Communications, and with it The Virginian-Pilot, is likely to be sold is a daunting endeavor. An end to the century-old tradition of leadership by a family with a historic commitment to public service journalism is a troubling prospect for Hampton Roads.”

  • Richard Just writes, “What happened at the Supreme Court 20 years ago tomorrow has been long forgotten by most Americans — if they ever heard about it at all. Unlike the better-known decisions of the last century, the ruling handed down on Jan. 13, 1988, had nothing to do with race or abortion rights. It didn’t become fodder for presidential candidates and hasn’t galvanized voters on either the left or right. Yet over the past two decades, the court’s ruling in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which concerned high school newspapers, has had far-reaching consequences. Not only has it changed the way journalism is taught at many schools, it has made it more difficult for high school students to learn the important lessons about democracy that come from publishing — or simply reading — serious newspapers.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special live coverage
    … of the Michigan primary, as well as the Democratic presidential debate live from Nevada. Coverage begins with ‘Hardball with
    Chris Matthews’ live from Las Vegas at 5 and 7 p.m. ET, ‘Tucker’ live at 6 p.m. ET and ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • A CNN release announced the network “will dedicate the 8 p.m. hour each weekday to the latest election news coverage from the campaign trail in a new program, CNN Election Center. Building on CNN’s successes and ratings wins from both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, CNN Election Center will be anchored by members of the ‘Best Political Team on Television’ from the New York-based CNN Election Center and on the trail by CNN anchor John Roberts.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Broadcasting & Cable published an editorial today that served as a call to the networks to focus more energy on presidential news coverage. It also applauded ABC News for its debate coverage, which rated extremely well, and its New Hampshire special, which didn’t, but was the only network that gave the primary a half-hour.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “A legal battle over advertisements for a new documentary about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton illustrates the folly of current campaign-finance laws, says the attorney for the producers of the film, which premieres tonight in Washington. ‘Hillary: The Movie’ is ‘a political documentary like Michael Moore or Al Gore has made,’ said James Bopp, who went to federal court last week to represent the movie’s producers. Yet the conservative group Citizens United, which produced the Clinton film, must ‘go to court to get permission to advertise the film… because of McCain-Feingold,’ he said.”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “If you saw John Kerry on ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ Sunday morning, you saw him talking about his endorsement of Barack Obama. And you probably also saw him successfully pull off a tough stunt — banning something he didn’t want from the show.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rep. Ron Paul took part in last Thursday’s GOP debate on Fox News after being excluded in the New Hampshire forum. His supporters were, well, less than happy with Fox News over the decision to leave out Paul from the N.H. forum, as Frank Luntz explained.”

  • TVNewser reports that MSNBC announced in a press release how it plans to handle hosting a debate and covering the Michigan primary tonight. The debate will take place at 9 p.m.
  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler writes, “The press, the pundits and the polls all got a big black eye this week after forecasting, with considerable certainty, a big victory for Sen. Barack Obama in the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. Much has already been written and broadcast about this episode. Newspapers and television networks have had stories about how everybody got it wrong and what the various reasons may have been. I don’t have much to add to this other than to wonder if individual news organizations — aside from their obvious, next-day follow-up stories — took some time to conduct their own in-house post-mortems to figure out if this glaring error in polling and news judgment should alter in some fundamental way the manner in which they approach political coverage. It’s not as though it hasn’t happened before.”

  • This Wednesday at Nathan’s Q&A cafe will feature Amy Holmes, described as “a three-fer: female, black and republican. There’s not much we won’t be able to politically slice and dice.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Hotline’s On Call is covering the Michigan primary live tonight.

  • Poynter’s Steve Klein reports, “No one has been more supportive of bloggers and more critical of mainstream media than Ted Leonsis, the former AOL executive who owns the NHL Washington Capitals. (OK, well maybe Mark Cuban is close.) Leonsis has paid to send independent bloggers to cover Caps prospects in Russia, and when long-time Washington Times hockey writer Dave Fay died late last year, no one was kinder. So when Leonsis shelled out $124 million over 13 years last week to keep his franchise player, Alex Ovechkin, in town — it was the biggest contract in Washington D.C. sports history — Leonsis had a right to expect some accurate coverage in the MSM and some honest passion from the bloggers. But to read the owner’s very active blog, Ted’s Take, it doesn’t appear he got a great deal of either.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Watch reports that Hitchens has quit smoking. No, really.

  • Be sure to c heck out Breitbart TV. Ed Driscoll reports, “About a minute into the latest B-Cast by Liz Stephans and Scott Baker of Breitbart.TV (whom we interviewed a few weeks ago on PJM Political), they casually mention that their previous show attracted about 400,000 views.”

  • Marc Fisher reports, “Living in a city without a full-time jazz station, I have to rely on CDs and downloads to hear my fill of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. But to discover new jazz from singer Madeleine Peyroux or pianist Bruce Barth, it’s necessary to reach past broadcast radio to online music services, music blogs and pay satellite radio. But now comes NPR Music, a sprawling Web site from National Public Radio on which I can listen to the NPR jazz (or classical or folk or indie rock) shows that don’t air on Washington’s public stations — as well as tap into song lists, video and audio of concerts, music-related stories from NPR’s news shows and a raft of programs from public stations across the country.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Wonkette reports, “Campaigns & Elections magazine was one of those old insider trade magazines for people that simply couldn’t get enough of campaign tactics and other campaigners in the off-season — but there’s nary an off-season anymore. So, C&E redesigned the magazine (it’s shiny!), started writing about politics and threw a swanky party with an open bar in a big black room to celebrate.” For pics, click here.

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    RADIO

  • Former CBS Public Eye editor Matthew Felling is hosting “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today at noon on WAMU 88.5, talking Macs and Movies.

  • The Redskins’ Tumultuous Season Didn’t Gain Yardage on Sports Radio

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    JOBS

  • CommunicationWorks is looking for a Media Manager.

  • mediabistro.com is looking for mediabistro.com Instructors.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for an Account Manager and a Senior Associate/Assistant Vice President.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • WFED Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor — AARP Bulletin.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer/Washington Bureau.

  • Strauss Radio Strategies, Inc. is seeking PR Pros Specializing in Broadcast.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Publisher and a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext