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Posts Tagged ‘Andrea Billups’

Morning Reading List, 12.19.07

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Good morning Washington. On this day in 1998, the House of Representatives sent articles of impeachment against Bill Clinton to the Senate. Oh, and Alyssa Milano turns 35. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • So far, you have already spent more than $500 on Christmas presents. Way to make us feel guilty.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • USAToday reports, “The Federal Communications Commission, overturning a 32-year-old ban, voted Tuesday to allow broadcasters in the nation’s 20 largest media markets to also own a newspaper.”

  • Frank Rich bashes political reporters.

  • A release announced, “In response to a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) vote in favor of relaxing media ownership rules and allowing companies in the top 20 national media markets to own both print and broadcast outlets, the Parents Television Council issued the following statement: ‘The PTC is deeply disappointed in the announcement today by the FCC that will effectively loosen longstanding rules for media ownership. While the ruling today will only affect a select number of US markets, even a small step in the wrong direction is a step in the wrong direction,’ said PTC President Tim Winter.”

  • Reuters reports, “A bipartisan group of U.S. senators threatened on Monday to override the Federal Communications Commission if the agency votes to loosen media ownership restrictions at a meeting scheduled for Tuesday.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “With Web companies now beginning to dominate the market for local ads online, newspaper publishers are scrambling to change the way they sell ads, hiring sales teams that specialize in the digital market and creating new editorial packages to sell. But it may be a case of too little, too late. McClatchy, which publishes 31 daily newspapers around the country, is revamping its commission and incentive plans to better reward staff for online sales. Gannett now operates 50 mom-centric social-networking sites around the U.S. as part of a broader strategy to boost online revenue through what it calls ‘hyper-localized’ sites. Other publishers, from Lee Enterprises to Media General, are taking steps of their own to jump-start sales of local online ads.”

  • Mixed Media reports, “No one will be surprised when Rupert Murdoch starts meddling with the editorial machinery of The Wall Street Journal, despite a formal agreement to preserve its independence. But is he doing it already?”

  • Forbes asks, “Holy smokes–what happened to McClatchy?”

  • PEJ News Coverage Index for December 9-14 shows, “The unlikely surge of former Arkansas Governor helped generate the biggest week of coverage for the presidential campaign so far in 2007. But as Huckabee is learning, some media attention is more welcome than others. Plus, the Mitchell report turns steroid abuse in baseball into a front-page story—some might say at long last.”

  • The AP reports, “A media watchdog group said Monday that 64 journalists in 17 countries have died while covering the news in 2007 — the deadliest year in more than a decade. The Committee to Protect Journalists said in an annual report that Iraq led the list for the fifth year in a row, with 31 dead — one fewer than a year ago. Somalia was second with seven dead in 2007, and Pakistan and Sri Lanka each recorded five deaths.”

  • The Chicago Sun-Times reports, “Like most American newspapers, the Chicago Tribune has been reducing the space for news in its print edition. But unlike most papers, it plans to charge more for less.”

  • Washington Post reports, “All Eyes on Blogging Iowa Newsman”

  • “The winners of the 2008 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards were announced on December 17, 2007.” For full results, click here.

  • The New York Times reports, “A usual round of media self-criticism turned into a schoolyard brawl last week, as editors, reporters and bloggers traded insults over a front-page article in The Washington Post, all at the very online water cooler where they usually get their news about the industry. The Post article, which ran on Nov. 29, was about rumors of Barack Obama’s ties to the Muslim world. The piece drew widespread criticism: the Columbia Journalism Review said the article ‘may be the single worst campaign ’08 piece to appear in any American newspaper so far this election cycle.’”

  • E&P reports, “Will 2008 be a winning campaign year for … newspapers? For the first time since John Kennedy beat Richard Nixon in a presidential race that, by a landslide, anointed television as the medium of choice for political advertising, newspapers are daring to believe they and their Web sites will get more than their usual miniscule share of candidates’ media buys.”

  • Check out The Washington Times’ Andrea Billups and her election blog.

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “Bill Clinton is right”

  • Text & Ideas talks to Politico’s Bill Nichols.

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of December 10-16, 2007.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the week of December 10-14, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ averaged 8.86 million Total Viewers and a 2.1/8 among Adults 25-54, placing second in both categories.”

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN’s LIVE, long-form programming style will allow viewers nationwide a rare opportunity to witness an entire caucus, from start to completion, bringing the nation to Iowa to witness the first election event in the 2008 Presidential race. C-SPAN will be on site at three of the state’s caucuses, with coverage starting at 7:00 PM (ET) Thursday, January 3rd, with the Democratic caucus aired LIVE on C-SPAN, and Republican caucus aired LIVE on C-SPAN2. The network will simulcast Iowa CBS affiliate KCCI-TV in Des Moines as part of its coverage to give national viewers the local angle on caucus events and results. C-SPAN will continue with its extensive coverage of the Presidential primary/caucus schedule on January 4, with events throughout New Hampshire, culminating with the New Hampshire Primary Tuesday, January 8.”

  • An ABC release announced, “Continuing the ‘Nightline’ series The Contenders, co-anchor Cynthia McFadden goes on the trail and behind the scenes with Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY). ‘Nightline’ will take viewers to Iowa to spend an all-access day in the life with the 2008 Democratic presidential contender. In the exclusive interview, they will cover everything from life on the campaign trail, to her personal and political campaign teams, to her recent endorsement from the Des Moines Register.”

  • Mixed Media reports, “Once Again, CNN Mixes Up Obama and Osama”

  • People Magazine reports, “CNN anchor Campbell Brown and her husband Dan Senor welcomed their first child, a boy, on Tuesday. Eli James Senor was born at exactly 10 a.m. and weighed 8 lbs. He is named in the memory of his grandfather, James Senor. ‘Eli and his mom are doing great,’ Dan Senor tells PEOPLE. ‘We are thrilled.’”

  • Content Bridges has “What Journalists Can Learn From Screenwriters Strike”

  • TVNewser has “5 Questions For… Joe Scarborough“. And, “Joe(y) Scarborough Endorses Ron Paul

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable-television provider, hired an executive from the Boston Consulting Group to head strategic and financial planning, two weeks after cutting its revenue and subscriber growth forecasts.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The amazing Tina Brown is in a newly struck, first-look deal to bring projects and story ideas to HBO, the TV network that also seems to understand ‘buzz’ and great storytelling versus the hackneyed stuff that is on the networks.”

  • From TVNewser: “Why CNN’s Walton is Having ‘So Much Fun’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • FishbowlNY reports, “Christopher Hitchens Implies Dead Congressman Was Cult Member”

  • Poynter’s Steve Outing answers, “Why Journalists Suck at Business”

  • Check out Slate’s chief political correspondent John Dickerson’s dispatches from New Hampshire this week.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Young Turks who made their mark as early backers of Facebook Inc. have raised a second investment round more than four times as large as their first, signaling their growing clout as an alternative to venture capitalists on Silicon Valley’s Sand Hill Road. Founders Fund Management, led by a quartet of wealthy and connected entrepreneurs behind such success stories as online payment service PayPal Inc., said Monday that it had raised $220 million from institutional investors to pump into new companies.”

  • MSNBC’s Steve Adubato writes, “Bill Clinton has come to his wife Hillary’s defense and I’m not convinced that’s a good thing. Clinton blames the media for not covering his wife fairly and he argues that we in the media are not focusing enough on Hillary’s experience, implying that we are holding her to a different and unfair standard.”

  • Don’t forget that tonight is The Washington Blogger December Meetup at 7:00PM at RFD. For more info, click here.

  • Wired reports, “After 10 Years of Blogs, the Future’s Brighter Than Ever”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Folio reports, “Radar magazine is increasing in frequency, from six to eight issues a year, and is raising its rate base from 150,000 to 200,000. The change will take effect in February 2008, one year after its relaunch in February 2007.”

  • Mr. Magazine’s 7 Great Magazine Moments in 07

  • “min’s Exclusive Review of 2007 Magazine Launches

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    RADIO

  • MarketWatch reports, “XM Satellite Radio Inc. said Monday it has settled a copyright infringement lawsuit filed by Universal Music Group over XM’s Inno portable device, which gives users the ability to record music.”

  • NPR’s The Bryant Park Project looks at who some of the Ron Paul supportes are.

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • This is Amy Mitchell’s last week as Managing Editor at The American Spectator. She is about to “embark on a new adventure,” details to follow.

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    JOBS

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education seeks an experienced reporter to join our teams of journalists who cover public policy and business issues.

  • Greenpeace is looking for a Media Officer.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Mediabistro Course

    Freelancing 101

    Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you'll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

    Morning Reading List, 09.28.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • 2 Amy’s wins the pizza poll!

  • 2 Clintons, 2 Stories — But Just 1 To See Print

  • Juan Williams: Bill O’Reilly Not A Racist

  • A NBC release announced that “Meet the Press with Tim Russert” “posted an impressive ratings win, outperforming the Sunday morning public affairs competition in all categories during the third quarter of 2007. According to Nielsen Media Research data, the NBC program attracted 3.088 million total viewers during the third quarter,” a 32% lead over ABC’s “This Week”, a 38% advantage over CBS’s “Face the Nation” and a 175% lead over “FOX News Sunday”.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers during the 3Q. This marks the first time that ‘This Week’ beat ‘Face the Nation’ since 3Q 2002. In addition, ‘Meet the Press’s’ 3Q total viewing lead over ‘This Week’ was 35% smaller versus 3Q 2006.”

  • Set your TiVo! A NBC release announced, “In her first-ever live television interview, Jenna Bush sits down with NBC News’ Ann Curry Monday, October 1 on NBC News’”

  • Again: Kurtz v. Silverstein.

  • Washington Post’s “The Post Politics Program,” aired on XM Satellite Radio’s POTUS ’08 program for the first time yesterday. The daily “The Post Politics Podcast” will air each weekday between 2:45 and 3 p.m. ET during “POTUS Live with Joe Mathieu.”

  • A tipster tells us, “Your account of Brad Pitt’s visit to the Post reminded me of a story from 1993, when Denzel Washington spent several days in the Post newsroom preparing for his part as an investigative reporter in the movie version of ‘The Pelican Brief.’ The scene was pretty much the same. Washington used then-National editor Fred Barbash’s office as a base for interviewing various reporters and editors. Barbash asked White House reporter Ann Devroy to take Washington to a White House briefing. Devroy agreed, but as she told some of us later she had absolutely no idea who Washington was until they were walking down 15th Street and passersby started doing double-takes and pointing at the actor. ‘What exactly do you do?’ Devroy asked. Washington explained who he was and what he was doing. ‘Oh,’ Devroy said. ‘I
    couldn’t figure out why people were making such a big deal about the
    new intern.’”

  • 5 Questions for Judy Woodruff.

  • PR Web reports, “Former CNN news anchor and ABC News correspondent Carol Lin has signed with Paul Schur, President of Washington, D.C.,-based PS & ASSOC, to represent her in all areas of public and media relations.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “Dick and J. Edgar Diss Kay Graham

  • OJR reports, “Markos Moulitsas at DailyKos this week raised an important issue to which all journalists who cover the Web ought to show greater sensitivity. Moulitsas complained about a Wall Street Journal article which claimed that Moulitsas’ website held a position on campaign finance reform that is, in fact, the opposite of Moulitsas’ position.”

  • Poynter Online has a letter from Nancy Schwerzler, former Baltimore Sun Washington Correspondent: “Regarding NY Sun’s article on NSA press briefings: It is hardly surprising that the NSA has conducted ‘seminars’ for reporters in an attempt to influence how they reported on national security issues.” Read the full letter here.

  • CJR asks, “Can the government help the press? Should it?”

  • Economist reports, “Although healthier than newspapers, consumer magazines have problems”

  • Regarding the Washington Times hiring freeze question, a reader tells us, “wash times hiring freeze question — there hasn’t really been one. in recent months they brought on sarah carter, andrea billups, and some others. but might be worth exploring how they are poaching metro desk and moving folks to national.”

  • Can you answer CQ’s Political Trivia this week?

  • Fox 28 reports, “A Pentagon source said Wednesday that certain Time Warner e-mails and Web sites have been blocked on Army computers around the world due to a security breach.”

  • vnunet.com reports, “A US-based copyright watchdog has sunk its teeth into Google by sending a report alleging copyright violations on Google Video to members of Congress.”

  • AP reports, “Microsoft Corp. and its hardware partners are trying to bridge the divide between home computers and TV sets this holiday season with the release of several ‘media extenders.’”

  • CNet News.com reports, “The first of the Webcast presidential dialogues put together by MySpace and MTV will debut on Thursday, September 27, with an appearance by former Democratic Sen. John Edwards as he meets with students at the University of New Hampshire.”

  • Multichannel News reports, “News Corp.’s Fox News group, in an overhaul of its online video strategy, is expanding the quantity of video content on FoxNews.com and plans to debut enhanced ‘community’ features on the site of the forthcoming Fox Business Network channel.”

  • E&P reports, “Ever since seven newspaper companies announced with much fanfare an alliance with Internet giant Yahoo in November 2006, scant detail has emerged concerning the revenue upside newspapers expected to reap. More outfits have joined the deal — as of now 17 companies and roughly 400 newspapers — and there is still questions about when the partnership will find its legs.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “Social-media sites are visited mainly by early technology adopters and pose thorny privacy problems but are an increasingly viable channel for news distribution for overwhelmed Internet consumers, panelists at the Emerging Technology Conference said on Wednesday.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission should review the practice of advertisers paying television programmers to feature products in shows to make sure disclosure rules are followed, two lawmakers said.”

  • CNN is dealing with some fall out from the “happy negro” comment.

    Jobs

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter for Pension & Benefits.

  • University of Maryland University College is looking for a Journalism & Photojournalism adjunct professors.

  • The Free Lance-Star Publishing Companies is seeking a Passionate Visual Journalist.

  • The Distilled Spirits Council is looking for a PR Manager.

  • Slate’s Washington D.C. office is hiring a one-year editorial assistant. More details on Craigslist.

  • International Center for Journalists is seeking an Editor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editor for All Things Considered.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for a Web Assistant.

  • Hanley Wood, LLC is looking for a Graphic Designer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Do Not Upset Ron Paul Fans

    This article by the Washington Times Andrea Billups has generated well over 200 comments. One Times source tells FishbowlDC that even Times articles linked from the Drudge Report don’t generate this kind of response.

    The Washington Times Doesn’t Do “Nitty Gritty”

    Andrea Billups, who recently re-joined the Washington Times, once commented on an interesting editorial policy (?) at the paper.

      I once worked at a paper where the top editor banned in a memo use of the term ‘nitty gritty,’ claiming it was Jazz-era slang for female genitalia. Having looked it up, I’m fairly sure that it’s not. I suppose I would agree that it’s jargon, though. But that was never the argument. It seems, in retrospect, a tad nutty if you ask me, but most editors, if they last long enough, come up with these insipid sacred cows that they enforce just because they can. Maybe it’s just editorial dementia.

    Billups Returns To Times

    Former Washington Times staffer Andrea Billups, who left the paper six years ago for her dream job at People’s Magazine, is returning to The Times as a feature writer and blogger for the National desk.