TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Andy Rooney’

Aide Says Anthony Was a Weiner To His Staff

Ben Fishel was all bright-eyed and smiling at Media Matters for America’s book party last night for organization founder David Brock. The only thing we knew when we first approached him was that he is the late Andy Rooney‘s grandson. But there’s so much more to this fresh faced young man in a blue checkered shirt and dark tie.

For one thing, he was the press secretary to ex-Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) who first encouraged the congressman to use Twitter. For another, Weiner basically canned him two weeks before the scandal broke. The departure, he explained, was something in between a contentious quitting and a firing.

Fishel, now the press secretary, for the nerdier, wonkier lawmaker and previously a press employee for MMFA for four years, hasn’t spoken publicly about working for Weiner until now. But last night he revealed a few choice details about how Weiner treated his staff. (We’re talking aides, not penis. We know how he treated his member.)

“I had words with him, ” recalled Fishel, who worked for Weiner for one year. “We butted heads. He was really a jerk and called women on the staff ‘fat.’ … He was so unbelievably cruel.” Fishel, who acknowledged the congressman had a quick wit and stood politically for all the things he did, reasoned, “People make mistakes with their penis all the time.” But being cruel? That’s a “day to day decision” a person consciously makes. While other aides would cower under Weiner’s domineering demeanor, he challenged him and called him out for the way he treated office employees. That didn’t go over so well.

Fishel explained that he was the one who initially tried to persuade Weiner to go on Twitter. He sent him a memo detailing why the lawmaker ought to sign up for Twitter. Though he sat mere feet from the congressman, the office red tape was an intriguing clusterf&%k: First he’d write the memo and an executive assistant would take it to the congressman. Next, the congressman would mark up the memo and fax it back to Fishel. “It was very bizarre,” he said.

At first Weiner shooed away Twitter as “trite.” Fishel gave up. But soon Weiner rolled back around and signed up for the Social Media tool that would be his demise. Said Fishel, “I didn’t think I had to brief him on that.”

We attempted to reach Weiner via his Twitter account. His account is up, but he doesn’t seem to use it anymore.

Read about what the aide describes as Weiner’s revolving door of hires as well as Rooney’s phone call to Fishel about Weiner…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Manage a top-notch freelancing career in our online boot camp, Freelancing 101! Starting August 18, freelancing experts will teach you the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your own schedule and managing clients.  Register now! 
 

WaPo‘s Weingarten Profiled in Washingtonian

Writing a feature on WaPo columnist and feature writer  Gene Weingarten is a lot like riding in a car with a backseat driver and likely, a crazy person. That’s the impression you get from reading Washingtonian‘s extensive profile on him this month.

In the course of the interview process, Weingarten manipulates the author, Tom Bartlett, into writing what he thinks is important. The first time, he shares an anecdote about a scary made-up story he told his son years ago. “Weingarten told me that anecdote knowing it would end up in print,” Bartlett writes.

Further in, he’s less subtle:

“During our lunch, Weingarten keeps tearing off little pieces of his dirty napkin, balling them up with his thumb and forefinger, and dropping them onto his plate amid the mashed remains of his mostly eaten lunch. It’s gross.

“Have you noticed what I’m doing as I’m talking?” he says, gesturing toward the mess. “Who does this? And I’m doing it as I’m telling you that I’m neurotic!” He then points to my pad of paper and says, “If I were writing this, I would note that.”

Funny, considering Weingarten, a two-time Pulitzer prize winner, didn’t always fancy himself “a great writer,” as he admits in the profile. And a reader can surmise that he still doesn’t.

Backseat driving aside, there are many details on what makes Weingarten tick (though Bartlett concludes he’s a bit of a broken clock), such as how his job as Associate Editor at Tropic, the Miami Herald‘s Sunday magazine, ended. Management was changing the paper the publication was printed on, so he quit.

Or, how he used having Hepatitis C to land a book deal as well as a job managing WaPo‘s Sunday Style section. He no longer has the disease, according to the profile, but we wanted to be sure if he actually ever had it. He didn’t respond to our tweets or emails. UPDATE: Weingarten, channeling the late Andy Rooney, finally replied. Please note: I mistakenly asked if he had Hepatitis B and he set me straight: “Hepatitis C, not B.    Yes, of course I had it.   You think I lied, in a book, and in my newspaper, about having a fatal disease?”

Many Weingarten’s fans agree on what his best story is: One from 2006 titled “The Peekaboo Paradox.” A scan of twitter shows that many of them have also already read Washingtonian‘s profile. Reactions to the story are overwhelmingly positive.

Read the full piece here.

Slate Writer Gets a Taste of Her Own Medicine

A couple of weeks ago, Slate’s D.C.-based Emily Yoffe posted a slideshow of people she thought should throw in the towel. Among them: Sumner Redstone, majority owner of CBS and Paramount Pictures, 60 MinutesAndy Rooney, NPR host Diane Rehm, and even such teen idols as Justin Bieber and Dick Clark (not a teen idol).

She asked for feedback. And boy, did she get it. Who knew Slate readers were such staunch Bieber defenders?

On Friday, she announced what readers had to say: “The results are in, and your No. 1 pick is … me! Many were moved to name me because they found my piece to be ‘mean-spirited,’ ‘outrageous and delusional,’ ‘useless drivel,’ ‘unfair,’ ‘hateful,’ ‘rude,’ and ‘ageist.’ One reader wanted to know, ‘Why don’t you just line these old folks up and shoot them?’”

Though Yoffe admits her column was “cheeky,” she didn’t back down. She also published other readers’ picks (ones that weren’t her). They include Pat Buchanan for his apparent anti-Semitism, John McCain, and “the Comics page,” because so many of its comics are written by ancient people and, in the case of Charles Schulz’s Peanuts, a dead person.

WaPo and NYT Lead Overseas Press Awards

2677-congratulations_greeting_cards.jpg WaPo has raised its Overseas Press Awards award total to 37. This year’s awards are being announced in Manhattan tonight.

The reporting team of Bob Woodward, Rajiv Chandrasekaran and Karen DeYoung won for best news interpretation for their series on the Obama Administration’s search for a new Afghanistan strategy. WaPo photographer Sarah Voisin won for images of residents in Mexican communities affected by drug wars.

The John Faber Award for Best photographic reporting from abroad in newspapers or news services went to WaPo’s Sarah Voisin.

Not included among the 37 OPC awards won by the newspaper, a book called The Good Soldiers by WaPo’s David Finkel. Finkel won the Cornelius Ryan OPC Book Award for his account of eight harrowing months with the 2-16 Ranger Army Battalion in Iraq.

NYT Magazine’s Alissa Rubin won for best magazine reporting for a story on a would-be female suicide bomber in Iraq. The TimesÂ’ second OPC award went to Keith Bradsher for best business reporting on the contradictions and promise of China’s environmental push.

WSJ’s Farnaz Fassihi won the coveted Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper reporting from abroad for”"Hearts, Minds and Blood: The Battle for Iran.”

The AP won the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for best photo reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage. Noteworthy: “Khalil Hamra’s pictures of the Israeli military incursion into Gaza showed bravery, especially as combatants mingled among the civilians.”

CBS’s Andy Rooney received the President’s Award for lifetime achievement and David Rohde, the NYT correspondent who escaped his Taliban captors, will light the Press Freedom Candle in honor of the 71 journalists killed last year in the line of duty.

In the cartoon category, THE THOMAS NAST AWARD for best cartoons on international affairs went to Nate Beeler, of The Washington Examiner.

See a complete list of award winners after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List 10.20.09

Good morning FishbowlDC! Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

What we know and what we’re reading this Tuesday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | IN MEMORIAM

NEWSPAPERS

Cuts at NYT was the topic of discussion on today’s Morning Media Menu with FishbowlNY’s Amanda Ernst.

Duke’s Chronicle catches up with WaPo‘s Dana Priest on investigative reporting.

TV

Booking Wars: Is Don Imus having a hard time booking CNN, MSNBC and CNBC talent on “Imus in the Morning” on FBN?

Former NBC White House and Washington correspondent Kevin Corke has landed a new gig in Miami. He writes on Facebook: “FINALLY GOT A JOB! I am the new main anchor at WTVJ (NBC) in Miami. Thanks to everyone for the well wishes and prayers throughout. Come see me in South Florida!” We’ll have a Q&A with Corke on FBDC later today.

Maryland Public TV celebrates 40 years.

RADIO

NPR’s “Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me” is on the road. NBC’s Brian Williams will join the show from Carnegie Hall this week for the “Not My Job” segment.

NEWS NOTES

The debate over health care reform is back as the biggest story last week, according to Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. This is the highest level of coverage since President Obama’s prime-time speech the week of September 7-13. But, obviously, late in the week, “balloon boy” captivated the media.

IN MEMORIAM

CBS remembered legendary CBS newsman Don Hewitt, who died in August, yesterday at the Time Warner Center. Morley Safer, Andy Rooney, Bill O’Reilly, Diane Sawyer, Charlie Gibson, Mike Wallace, Rome Hartman, “60 Minutes” executive producer Jeff Fager, Les Moonves, actor Alan Alda and Hewitt family were present. “Don was utterly incapable of small talk,” said Safer. “Don liked to boast he could cut the Lord’s prayer in half and make it better.”

HAT TIPS: mediabistro, TVNewser, Politico

President Obama to Speak at Cronkite Memorial

The White House confirms today that President Obama will attend and speak at a memorial service for Walter Cronkite in NY next month. AP reports the speakers list is not yet complete, but Bill Clinton, Katie Couric, Andy Rooney, Buzz Aldrin, Bob Schieffer and Tom Brokaw are expected.

And Mickey Hart, Wynton Marsalis, Michael Feinstein, Jimmy Buffett and the U.S. Marine Corps band are anticipated performers.

Morning Reading List 08.18.09

Good morning FishbowlDC! Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

That’s Rob Thomas above- Mix 107.3′s Tommy McFly hosted a concert and Q&A with the musician yesterday at Gibson Guitar Shop in Chinatown.

Happy 21st Birthday to future DC journo Elyssa Dornic! What we know and what we’re reading this Tuesday morning…

TV | ONLINE | WEST WING REPORTAGE | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

TV

According to the Daily Kos/Research 2000 Poll, twenty-somethings aren’t watching cable news. Eighty-two percent of respondents, between the ages of 18 and 29, said they “never” watch Fox, followed by MSNBC (75 percent) and CNN (65 percent). (h/t Calderone)

Daljit Dhaliwal, a former CNN and BBC anchor, will replace Martin Savidge as anchor of the PBS program “Worldfocus” beginning Aug. 31st. Savidge will move to a special correspondent role. “Martin Savidge has been restless to get out in the field,” his EP Marc Rosenwasser said.

ONLINE

Cuts at Salon.

Wikipedia has hit 3 million articles. And still FishbowlDC doesn’t have an entry.

WEST WING REPORTAGE

What is the First Lady reading on her summer vacay? Michelle Obama shares her summer picks for herself and the Obama girls on Oprah.com.

White House Social Secretary Desiree Rogers graces the cover this month of her hometown glossy Michigan Avenue.

White House speechwriter Jon Lovett turned 27 aboard Air Force One, Playbook reports this morning: Press Secretary Robert Gibbs led him to the conference room up front. The President and a cake were waiting, and the boss led a rendition of “Happy Birthday.”

NEWS NOTES

President Obama, former President Bill Clinton, Buzz Aldrin, Nick Clooney (in his son George’s place), Les Moonves, Sean McManus, Bob Schieffer, Katie Couric, Tom Brokaw and Andy Rooney are among those who may speak at the memorial service of Walter Cronkite in September in NY.

Didn’t make the Hill‘s annual 50 Most Beautiful People list? They, the “Fab Fifty’s 50 Most Fabulous People,” feel your pain (via Playbook).

HAT TIPS: mediabistro, TVNewser, Politico

JOBS after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List 07.24.09

Good morning FishbowlDC! Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Happy Birthday to Dan Reilly and Eamon Javers! What we know and what we’re reading this Friday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE | WEST WING REPORTAGE | IN MEMORIAM | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

Is NYT keeping the Boston Globe after all?

The Ann Arbor News has printed its final edition.

TV

VF is torturing its intern with cable news.

Final numbers are in for Wednesday’s Obama news conference (via TVNewser). 24.68M Total Viewers watched on 11 networks. That’s down 14% percent from the 28.81 million who watched Obama’s last newser in April, off 39% from Obama’s second news conference in March, and down 50% from his first primetime newser in February

More numbers for you- there are now more TV sets than people in the US, according to a new Nielsen study.

Politico‘s executive editor Jim VandeHei, publisher Robert Allbritton, editor-in-chief John Harris and senior political correspondent Ben Smith made an appearance on Charlie Rose Tuesday (where was Mike Allen- it could have been a VF reunion).

Tonight, Charlie Gibson hosts a special edition of “20/20″ on ABC- “Over a Barrel: The Truth About Oil.”

Who’s watching Willie Geist‘s 5:30amET MSNBC show? “Drug dealers, hookers, drunks coming home from bars…” Nice.

ONLINE

WebNewser: AP added its name to the list of media companies aggressively seeking to protect their content. The AP board of directors Thursday tasked AP with creating a news registry that will tag and track all AP online content in order to ensure compliance with terms of use.

NEW NOTES

Eekk… NRO asks “Is Nico Pitney Huffington Post’s Jayson Blair?”

WEST WING REPORTAGE

What was the headline from President Obama’s Wednesday prime-time presser? Probably Obama’s answer to the Chicago Sun-TimesLynn Sweet‘s question on the arrest of Harvard Prof. Henry Louis Gates.

Jon Stewart had a field day with President Obama’s pitching skills on the Daily Show. Now Major League Baseball has pulled the video, which it owns, so it can’t be seen in re-runs or online clips.

IN MEMORIAM

AP: Walter Cronkite was remembered as a great journalist, sailor, friend and father during services yesterday. “I just feel so terrible about Walter’s death that I can hardly say anything,” said longtime CBS newsman and 60 Minutes commentator Andy Rooney.

NYT: Walter Cronkite told his children from time to time that he was “just” a reporter, one who had “just ended up reporting bigger and bigger stories.”

And Howard Kurtz‘s write-up (who we noted yesterday was there with a notepad) of the funeral at WaPo.

HAT TIPS: mediabistro, TVNewser, Politico

JOBS after the jump…

Read more

CBS Statements On The Death Of Walter Cronkite

Katie Couric, anchor and managing editor, CBS Evening News, correspondent, 60 Minutes: “When I think of Walter Cronkite, I think of his high journalism standards, integrity – but most of all his humanity. I think he was so trusted because he exhibited a sense of purpose and compassion, night after night. He was the personification of excellence.”

Don Hewitt, executive producer, CBS News, creator of 60 Minutes and Cronkite’s first executive producer on the CBS Evening News: “How many news organizations get the chance to bask in the sunshine of a half-century of Edward R. Murrow followed by a half century of Walter Cronkite?”

Andy Rooney, 60 Minutes commentator: “I’ve been proud over the years to see Walter become, not just one of the best known people on television but one of the best known people in the whole world of people. He was proud of me, too and there’s no better feeling in life than that. I wouldn’t trade Walter Cronkite liking me for just about anything I’ve ever had.”

We posted earlier a statement from Sean McManus, President of CBS News and Sports. After the jump, statements from Les Moonves, Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Rick Kaplan, Susan Zirinksy, Charles Osgood, and more…

Read more

Rooney To Be Honored

…definitely not for any “60 Minutes” segment I’ve seen lately. Talk about tired and dull…

    NPC’s Silver Owls will rekindle memories of the Club’s coveted Fourth Estate Award on Thurs., Oct. 16 at a Fall Hoot honoring the long-time CBS “60 Minutes” essayist Andy Rooney.

    When Walter Cronkite received the initial Fourth Estate Award in 1973, he wanted his favorite newswriter and producer, Andy Rooney, to be a roaster, along with John Charles ( “What’s My Line”) Daly and FCC Commissioner Paul Porter.

    Rooney, the sole survivor of the trio, will recall that event and more when he becomes the latest recipient of he Order of the Owl at the October Hoot.

    The Gridiron Club’s noted pianist John Fluck will accompany Silver Owl choristers in a musical salute to Rooney.

NEXT PAGE >>