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Posts Tagged ‘Bernstein’

Morning Reading List, 10.24.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think global warming is no big deal.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-fourth time in twenty-six weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/9 and 2.58 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 70,000 for the week. This marks ABC’s best demo performance in five months (w/o 5/14/07). Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ posted its highest delivery in nearly six months (w/o 4/23/07), averaging 8.1 million to NBC’s 8.2 million. The ABC broadcast also placed first among Households (5.7/12), tying NBC for the week.”

  • Matthew Felling on “The Drudge Effect.”
  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of October 15-19, 2007. The NBC broadcast has now won for two straight weeks and for three of the last four weeks.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “In an era when commercial radio seems to be floundering, National Public Radio is hitting its stride. Some 25.5 million people tune into its programming each week, up from 13 million a decade ago. It has more than 800 member stations, up from 635 a decade ago. … Much of this growth has occurred under Ken Stern, NPR’s chief executive, who joined as executive vice president in 1999.”

  • Is The Washington Post into wife swapping? His Extreme-ness explains.

  • Tell Media Matters what you think. Take their survey here.

  • Baltimore Business Journal reports, “Senior citizens living in Europe and the Middle East will soon be able to watch shows produced for elderly audiences by Retirement Living TV, thanks to two new international deals expected to be unveiled this week. The television network, owned and operated by Catonsville-based Erickson Retirement Communities, signed it’s first international programming deal Monday with Anarey Communication’s Health Channel in Israel to air three of its feature shows. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.”

  • Commonwealth Times reports, “Jackie Jones, a former editor for The Washington Post, has spent her career working at more than 11 news services, but she tells VCU students not to resent small beginnings. … Jones came to VCU after she was awarded the 2007 Virginius Dabney Distinguished Professorship.”

  • USA Today offers an excerpt from Cathie Black’s Basic Black, “a thoughtful book on achieving success and balance in life. … Black, 63, oversees 19 magazines in the USA and 200 publications internationally — including Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping,Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar — as president of Hearst Magazines.”

  • “NPR to Self: Ixnay on the ‘Ixnay’

  • TVNewser reports, “If you were watching Fox News Channel this weekend then you noticed some programming changes. FNC SVP Bill Shine tells TVNewser he’s just ‘tweaking’ the schedule to see what works. Shine says being ‘in the middle of the NFL season’ is a good time to try out new anchors and new programs.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins writes, “NYT Misses True Nature of Clinton-Drudge Relationship”

  • DCRTV points us to this release, announcing “The District of Columbia’s Office of Cable Television and Telecommunications has been officially renamed the DC Office of Cable Television, as set forth in an Administrative Order signed and released by Mayor Adrian M. Fenty.”

  • Bassam Sebti writes in the Washington Post, “What I Risked as an Iraqi Journalist”

  • Inside Cable News reports, “GretaWire blogs about her first interviews with Laura Bush as she follows the First Lady around the Middle East/Africa…”

  • AdAge reports, “HuffPo Will Lose a Lot More Than Money If It Doesn’t Pay Talent”

  • PR Week talks to Paul Pendergrass, “a self-described ‘lifetime flack,’ had a career working for Coca-Cola in almost all facets of communications in the US, Europe, and South Africa before opening his own consultancy in Atlanta in 2001.”

  • As of yesterday, “NPR’s The Bryant Part Project will take a look at nuclear power through a unique multimedia series — including four days of interviews and reports on the radio show and video and interactive features and discussions online.” For the full schedule, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Another longtime publishing executive is exiting Time Inc. David Morris, who has been the publisher of Entertainment Weekly, is leaving the company after 21 years. The magazine will be swept under a new umbrella group called the Time Inc. Entertainment Group.”

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Unit have received the 2007 Online News Association Journalism Award for their reporting on the Mark Foley Congressional Page scandal on the Investigative Unit’s web page, ‘The Blotter,’ the Online News Association and the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communications announced Friday.”

  • Reuters reports, “MediaNews Group Inc said on Monday that Hearst Corp bought a stake in the company for $317 million as part of a complex deal between the two privately held publishers involving several San Francisco-area.”

  • The Houston Chronicle reports, “The Houston Chronicle is cutting about 5 percent of its work force through layoffs and the elimination of open positions as it restructures the operations of the newspaper, Publisher and President Jack Sweeney said Monday. Approximately 70 employees will be affected by the changes.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, Time Warner Inc.’s Internet unit, is introducing wireless services to entice some of its 114 million monthly U.S. online visitors to access the company’s Web sites with their mobile phones.”

  • Campaign Standard reports on “a controversy brewing inside the Beltway.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “When Beijing was appointed to host the 2008 Olympic Games, it promised that foreign media would have the same ability to report as in previous Olympics; no less, no more. … Simply delivering on China’s original promise is hard enough, I was told by an insider of one of the larger news operations, because of the way this country is organized. This person’s news organization is bringing in hundreds of reporters, and it wants to broadcast from over 100 locations in China — just as like it did for Olympics in other nations.”

  • Check out Right-Wing Facebook, launched by People for the American Way and RightWingWatch.org.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Bernstein makes first visit to Nixon Library”

  • Sacramento Bee reports, “The last lingering detail of a complicated $1 billion newspaper sale by The McClatchy Co. has been wrapped up. Hearst Corp. has paid $317 million for a stake in Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc., according to a regulatory filing.”

  • On Plame’s book, The New York Times writes, “Her Identity Revealed, Her Story Expurgated”

  • Wonkette reports, “That’s ostensible born-again Christian Tom DeLay and ostentatious, drunken God-hater Christopher Hitchens making nice with each other at the Hill’s book fair last week!”

  • TVNewser reports, “Up against baseball, football, and some desperate housewives, FNC’s GOP debate in Orlando Sunday night pulled in a respectable 2,462,000 total viewers (live + same day), and 773,000 in the A25-54 demo.”

  • Romenesko reports, “From Joseph N. DiStefano, Philadelphia Inquirer: Knight Ridder did develop a plan to consolidate copy desks into a few regional centers, according to newspaper executives I talked to when I was covering the company in 2005-2006.”

  • McClatchy reports, “American taxpayers are helping to foot the bill so foreign writers can savor California wine. Subsidized by the Agriculture Department and the wineries, the writers from Canada, Europe and Asia tour some of this country’s most renowned wine regions, and winemakers say their stories boost foreign sales. Lawmakers agree, and they want to increase funding in the new farm bill that senators will consider next week.”

  • From The New York Observer: “Analyzing Bill Keller Analyzing War and Peace”

  • The Sacramento Bee reports, “Serious philosophers make the case that Jon Stewart is the Socrates of our day”

  • B&C reports, “Presidential candidate and Illinois Democratic Sen. Barack Obama wants Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin Martin to take a series of intermediary steps before making the leap to rewrite media-ownership rules, saying that not to do so would be irresponsible.”

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times Co reported a 6.7 percent rise in profit on Tuesday because of higher national advertising sales and a price increase for its flagship newspaper, sending its shares up as much as 8 percent.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein announced today that J. William Leonard, Director of the Information Security Oversight Office, who will be retiring from the post at year’s end, has agreed to become Senior Counselor to the Archivist beginning in January 2008.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Reuters has said that it is working with Nokia on a project that could ‘transform the way journalists file news reports on the move’. It is a new mobile application which the agency said is ‘a lightweight toolkit that provides everything journalists need to file and publish stories from even the most remote regions of the world.’”

  • New York Post reports, “American Heritage will rise again. Edwin S. Grosvenor has purchased the magazine, Web site and book division from the Forbes family with plans to resume publication with a December/January issue. The deal is for $500,000 in cash and the assumption of about $10 million in subscription liabilities, putting the deal’s total value at around $11 million.”

  • “This Wednesday evening at 6:30 PM, October 24, Martin Luther King, III, CEO of Realizing The Dream Foundation and AmericanLife TV Network (www.americanlifetv.com) will be hosting a reception and screening of the documentary ‘Poverty in America’. Reporter Nick Clooney and Representatives Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bruce Braley (D-Iowa) will also be in attendance.”

  • Reuters reports, “Comcast Corp said on Monday that file transfers on peer-to-peer networks such as BitTorrent may be delayed by bandwidth management technology, but it denied blocking access to any applications or content.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., owner of the world’s most popular search engine, offered to preserve some business practices at DoubleClick Inc. in a bid to win antitrust approval for its proposed $3.1 billion purchase of the company.”

  • Wired Magazine talks to James Murdoch “on Satellite TV, His Google Deal, and What Mogul Means”

  • Washington Times praises Fox’s Chris Wallace for his job as moderator during last weekend’s debate.

  • CNN announced in a release yesterday, “For her services to journalism, Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent, today was awarded a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Queen Elizabeth II.”

  • Check out “Deborah Kanafani, Author of Unveiled and mb Instructor, on Writing Controversial Nonfiction vs. Controversial Memoir.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Wayne Metcalfe, vice president of the Genealogical Society of Utah, … announced a five-year partnership agreement to digitize case files of approved pension applications of widows of Civil War Union soldiers from the National Archives.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “As moderator of Meet the Press, Tim Russert is the one who usually asks the tough questions. That role was reversed yesterday at the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. Russert chatted with eighth graders at the independent school, touching on the 2008 presidential election, before accepting the Magis Spirit Award for his support of Gesu and other local Jesuit ministries at a ceremony in the cozy first-floor library.”

  • TVNewser reports,Rush Limbaugh Gushes Over Erin Burnett

  • “This headline’s on the Post’s politics Web page. Well, has anyone ever seen them together in the same place at the same time? There’s only one way to find the truth: Look up Rudy’s skirt,” Wonkette suggests.

  • Inside Cable News writes,Mika Brzezinski: The next Andrea Mitchell?”

  • East West Magazine reports on the Dalhi Lama’s appearance in D.C. last week. “In closing remarks, the Dalai Lama pointed to the cameras in the back of the room where dozens upon dozens of the press gathered and said that the media has the role to educate and change society without ‘preaching’ and that education is a key to provoke positive change. “India, the Indian constitution is not a rejection of religion…it respects all beliefs, all equal…this interpretation, this inclusive secular way of education is very, very important.’”

  • A release announced, “Danny Heitman is the winner of the second annual In Character Prize for editorial and opinion writing about the human virtues, presented at an October 18th ceremony at New York City’s Yale Club. The Louisiana-native won the $10,000 prize for his essay ‘Daily Thanksgiving is Worth the Work,’ originally published in the November 22, 2006 edition of the Christian Science Monitor (also the publisher of last year’s winning essay).”

  • A USAToday release announced, “USATODAY.com announces the launch of five new widgets to its site, widgets.USATODAY.com. This second round of widgets will roll out through mid-November. Originally launched on Sept. 4, 2007, USATODAY.com’s widgets provide another way for consumers to experience and share news and information online in the manner that is most convenient to them. Users can use widgets to incorporate some of the most popular features of USATODAY.com on their blog, web page or social network.”

  • “In this month’s new and improved Video Pitch Slam 1-on-1, three hopeful writers pitch Blender editor-in-chief Craig Marks on camera with stories ranging from the music scene at the South Pole to a closing time anthem. The mag’s wide open to feature stories — for specifics, see our How to Pitch: Blender article — so keep watching to see if Craig buys anyone’s story.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Reading The New York Times’ coverage of the conservative Values Voter Summit held in Washington, D.C., this past weekend, where Republican presidential contenders paraded before evangelical activists, it was clear who the Times thought was the star of the event: Rudy Giuliani.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Today’s Washington Post crossword features an unusually meta pair of consecutive clues (16-and 17-Across). We’re anxious to see if the sudoku world will respond by encoding the 1 through 9 matrix to make fun of Oral Roberts.”

  • New York Times opines, “The administration’s distaste for a federal shield bill — and its claims that it threatens national security — should be seen as just another extension of its obsession with secrecy.”
  • You may have noticed that CNN’s logo has gone from red to green in honor of Planet in Peril, which aired last night and tonight from 9-11 ET.

  • Check out The memeorandum Leaderboard which “lists the sources most frequently posted to memeorandum.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS said it didn’t take any remedial action after the Federal Communications Commission found drama Without a Trace indecent back in 2006, saying it didn’t think it had to.”

  • Blogging on The Huffington Post, Valerie Plame writes, “I just learned the other day that my scheduled Tuesday appearance on the Charlie Rose show has been canceled. The show’s producer said it was because Charlie Rose wanted to prepare for an appearance next week by CIA Director General Michael Hayden. How ironic is that? I could have told Mr. Rose a few things about General Hayden, but I’m sure he’ll do a fine job with his interview questions without me.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Countdown with Keith Olbermann won the 8pmET hour in the A25-45 demo Friday night topping The O’Reilly Factor by 25,000 viewers (live+ same day). Bill O’Reilly still had the #1 program in total viewers with 1.4M, more than doubling Olbermann’s audience. O’Reilly was anchoring, but it was a previously aired program (Oct. 9).”

    Jobs

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Legal Correspondent.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • A National Consumer Magazine is looking for a Sales Representative-D.C., Philly, Baltimore.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military is looking for a Reporter.

  • Voice of America is seeking a Senior TV Production Specialist.

  • CNSNews.com is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 06.26.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • What you’ve missed out on during the endless Paris Hilton coverage.

  • An NBC release announced that “The Chris Matthews Show” was “the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show topping CBS’s ‘Face the Nation,’ ABC’s ‘This Week’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending June 17, 2007.”

  • How dare you call the Extreme-ness “unknown.”

  • Check out mediabistro.com’s DC Courses and Semninars.

  • Slate launched Slate V Monday, their new video magazine.

  • The Politico will co-sponsor another Republican debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, this time with CNN and the Los Angeles Times.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Authors Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr. have had to labor not only to escape the shadow of Watergate reporting hero Bernstein but also to cope with the particular loathing the Clinton camp has reserved for their biography, ‘Her Way.’”

  • Fox’s Liguori, About to Step Into the Senate’s Line of Fire

  • Internet radio stations to protest royalty hikes

  • Pearlstine’s Plame Book Blames Everyone

  • Ah, the bickering continues:

      Wait, so let me get this straight: The Hill, who were the winners through the agreed-upon seven innings, were the ones who were so upset at the prospect of losing? Wouldn’t it be the team that wanted to extend the game past the ending point — in much the same way grade-school children are wont to do — that would be the one pathetically desperate not to lose?

    And another: “RC vs. Hill = R-E-M-A-T-C-H”

  • Patrick Ruffini on the Politico’s redesign.

  • AOL takes page from blogs, relaunches news

  • Scott Collins: “The Democrats are dead wrong not to debate on Fox News.”

  • Mickey Kaus fact checks Tim Russert.

  • How did you celebrate National Columnists Day?
  • Reuters reports, “The family and colleagues of Alan Johnston, a BBC reporter kidnapped by Islamists in Gaza, urged his captors on Monday not to harm him after he appeared in a video wearing what he said was an explosive belt.”

  • WAMU announced it will turn off its two online music streams today, in recognition of a “Day of Silence” for webcasters across the country. “The online stream of WAMU’s BluegrassCountry.org and WAMU 88.5 Channel 2 on wamu.org — which broadcasts music content from WTMD in Towson, Md. — will go silent for a day.” Visitors to the sites who click on the streaming audio links will instead hear a recorded statement. The station’s on-air broadcast on 88.5 FM, as well as its HD on-air signals, will not be affected. The Internet radio “Day of Silence” is being organized by SaveNetRadio.org, a coalition of artists, labels, listeners, and webcasters. It is meant to represent the silence that could occur when new online music royalty rates set by the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) take effect July 15.”

  • Regarding Jo Becker a reader writes, “Also, is correct for Post to refer to her as a ‘staff writer’ when she is obviously a staff writer now at Times?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Broadcast television’s annual springtime sales bazaar drew to a close Friday with the five networks surpassing their estimates by ringing up a combined $9.3 billion in commitments for prime-time commercial spots for the coming TV season.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.’s shares are ‘undervalued’ because the company is unlikely to succeed in combining with larger rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. and offers a better product, Merrill Lynch & Co. said.”

  • Deborah Howell addresses the updates FOIA so badly needs, “Reporters use FOIA a lot less than businesses do, probably one reason the U.S. Chamber of Commerce supports reform, along with about 100 other organizations.”

  • Parents Television Council President Tim Winter will testify before the Senate Commerce Committee on issue of television violence at the “Impact of Media Violence on Children” hearing at 10 a.m. today.

  • Anita Kumar from the St. Petersburg Times is joining the Washington Post as a new statehouse correspondent in Richmond.

  • The Deal reports, “The proposed $17.52 billion Thomson-Reuters merger is expected to result in an asset sale in order to win regulatory approval.”

  • Ronald Aronica and Mtetwa Ramdoo, business analysts, weigh in on Tom Friedman’s book with a critical analysis.

  • New York Business.com reports, “Publisher David Carey was pressing the flesh last week during the final stretch of his race to fill Conde Nast Portfolio’s second issue with ads. He met with clients to share enthusiastic e-mails from some of the business title’s high-profile readers, media buyers say. His efforts to retain all his advertisers haven’t been entirely successful.”

  • PBS Tells Producer Not To Hire Conservatives.”

  • Roger Aronoff thinks, “This has been a rough year for Tim Russert, though you wouldn’t know it the way he is treated by the media.”

  • RenewAmerica responds to WashingtonTimes

  • The New York Times reports, “This week, Mr. Binn will announce that his magazine company, Niche Media, will merge with Greenspun Media Group of Las Vegas — which publishes Vegas, Wynn and Venetian Style, among other magazines — and Ocean Drive Media Group, which publishes Ocean Drive and Ocean Drive Español and several other magazines.”

  • Emily Lenzner is leaving NPR to fill in for ABC’s This Week Editorial Producer Ilana Drimmer, who will be on maternity leave through the end of the year.

  • MinOnline reports, “‘Gossip’ Remains Advertising Stronger Than ‘Real’ News And Business.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext