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Posts Tagged ‘Betsy Woodruff’

And Then There Were None: Betsy Woodruff Leaves National Review for Examiner

Earlier this month, Dylan Byers observed that the National Review Online newsroom was enduring a sudden exodus. Though their political reporting had been praised during the government shutdown in October of last year, by February of this year, many had left for better opportunities. Of the reporters who covered the shutdown, for example, the only one left was Betsy Woodruff.

Well now, even Betsy is saying farewell to the National Review. The Washington Examiner announced yesterday that Woodruff would be coming on board as a Political Writer, reporting on the Senate and House elections this fall. She will also help out on Capitol Hill, and write pieces on political and popular culture that will appear every week or so online and in the Examiner magazine.

National Review‘s Editor Rich Lowry told Byers that he would be hiring more staff soon. But we wonder if he’ll have any time for interviews. At this rate, before long he’ll be busy writing and editing every story on the website by himself.

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Gay Marriage Wins at SCOTUS, Summer Sun Tries to Kill Everyone

Gay marriage won big at the Supreme Court today, but Washington, D.C.’s summer heat took second. Little more than an hour after the court released two landmark gay rights opinions, there were arguably more reporters trolling the plaza outside for interviews than demonstrators left to talk to. We got asked for comment three times before we even got across 1st Street. Yes, given the heat, we were dressed like Midwestern tourists, but still… you know it’s bad when the Repent or Perish guy is getting most of the action.

You can’t blame people for bailing pretty quickly, though—the blazing sun and stifling humidity made it feel close to 105, according to some reports. You can call them wimps, however. Or maybe just naive. This is DC, afterall. “Overheard at #scotus: ‘Oh my god it’s so much hotter than I expected!’ Oh honey,” tweeted National Review’s Betsy Woodruff. In a retweet, Washington Examiner’s Justin Green added, “Oh honey indeed.”

The smartest in the crowd, though, weren’t even on the plaza but across the street and under the shade of the trees by the Capitol, sipping cool drinks and laughing at us fools melting on the Court’s steps. Like, say, CNN’s Senior Legal Analyst Jeffrey Toobin:

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Garlic-Scented Freelance Journo No Fan of Texting at Networking Soireés

A networking event to mark a business partnership between two fiercely ideological magazines isn’t exactly a wild time. But it’s part of the job for some media professionals in D.C.

Even so, freelance journalist Murray Waas, in the dimly-lit setting shown here, believes that if you’re attending such an event, you shouldn’t be on your phone.

“What is the point of going out when you’re texting?” Waas said to National Review reporter Andrew Stiles Thursday night. Apparently unsure what to make of the unsolicited social commentary, Stiles awkwardly replied, “I don’t know. To look like you have something to do.”

Waas floated around the party, hosted by The Nation and National Review at the Mayflower Renaissance hotel, butting into conversations, preferring to talk directly into people’s ears despite being audible at a normal conversational distance.

The writer made a name for himself during the Bush (43) years, reporting on the White House and, in the early 1990s, reporting on the Gulf  War. He was even nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1993. Howard Kurtz, then a media critic for the Washington Post, wrote in 2006 that Waas was “getting his day in the sun.” Nowadays Waas updates his personal blog and freelances. He has written for the Los Angeles Times, The Hill, The Boston Globe, Talking Points Memo, The Atlantic and Reuters, among others.

He’s been featured in a lengthy 2007 WCP piece by Erik Wemple and Jason Cherkis (in the least flattering way) and in a rebuttal by Matthew Yglesias at ThinkProgress (the most flattering way).

“He was one of the biggest creeps I’ve ever talked to, saying things like ‘I’m your friend, right? We’ve been talking for five minutes, [and] I’m your best friend here?’” one attendee at Thursday’s gathering remarked to FishbowlDC. “And he smelled like garlic and booze.”

Yum.

About 100 people showed up for the event, all wearing name tags. Among them was National Review‘s star Capitol Hill Editor Robert Costa. Read more

Boyle’s Taco And Other Scenes From Breitbart News‘s CPAC Fiesta

Yes, another CPAC post…

The Breitbart Embassy along with NewsMax on Friday hosted a fiesta with a real life mariachi band after the second day of CPAC. The party also featured a full buffet of tacos and two separate bars with beer, sangria and margaritas.

Matt Boyle of Breitbart News, and a perpetual point of FBDC fascination, was seen eating two tacos with nothing but meat on them. This, despite tables laid out with elaborate salsas, sour cream, rice and beans.

At around midnight, Americans for Tax Reform President Grover Norquist took over one of the bars and started serving shots.

Notables: Breitbart News‘s Larry Solov, Kerry Picket and Michael Patrick Leahy; CQ Roll Call‘s Jonathan Strong; National Review‘s John Fund and Betsy Woodruff; BuzzFeed‘s John Stanton; Brian Darling, counsel to Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.); and GOProud’s Jimmy LaSalvia (yes, they let him in, despite his group not being allowed at CPAC).

Quotable: “The most diversity here is the mariachi band.”– a partygoer, noting the mostly male, mostly white crowd.

More photos… Read more