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Posts Tagged ‘Bill Clinton’

NBC: Nestle Baked Cookies

So why did Sen. Barack Obama come to the back of the plane and join reporters on Monday?

Well, it was, in part, to thank NBC embed Mike Memoli for the cookies his mother had sent to Obama.

While home on Sunday, Memoli told his mother — famous at The Hotline (Memoli’s previous employer) for her cookies — that Monday was Obama’s birthday so she sent her son back on the trail with some homemade treats (she once gave Bill Clinton cookies, too).

Memoli gave them to the campaign (“If you can pass them on to him, it would make my mom happy,” Memoli told the campaign staffer) and, lo and behold, Obama joined reporters later to thank Memoli for the gift.

Obama’s “thank you” trip worked out well for reporters, who used the occasion to pepper Obama with questions.

Memoli is temporarily on the Obama beat, as regular NBC embed Athena Jones is on vacation.

Morning Reading List, 04.07.08

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Good morning Washington. Playbook tells us that Bloomberg’s Billy McQuillen, “who provides ‘adult’ supervision to Catholic University’s newspaper, is a birthday boy today.’”

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | EVENTS | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Monica Lewinsky will vote for Obama in ’08.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “Went to yet another ‘retirement’ party for a couple of newspaper writer friends of mine taking the buy out and getting the hell out of Dodge. All while the losers ‘running’ the paper (In to the ground..) are staying.”

  • This week’s mediabistro.com classes include How to Write About Anything, Interviewing Techniques and Fact-Checking.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • DCRTV reports,Richard Willing has joined the Office Of The Director of National Intelligence as its director of public affairs. Willing covered civil and criminal justice issues, as well as intelligence and national security, for USA Today from 1997 until this January.”

  • A release announced, “The Center for Public Integrity is pleased to announce that David E. Kaplan has been named the new Director of its International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ).”

  • News-Press.com reports,Kate Marymont, vice president and executive editor/Information Center at The News-Press and news-press.com, was named today as vice president/Information Center Content for McLean, Va.-based Gannett Inc., the paper’s owner.”

  • Business Wire reports,Jennifer Carroll, vice president of New Media Content and an architect of the company’s Information Center initiative, will become vice president of Digital Content for Gannett Digital.”

  • The Washington Post announced, “The Maryland desk is delighted to announce that we’ve hired Aaron Davis, an enterprise reporter for the Associated Press in Sacramento, Calif., to cover law enforcement in Prince George’s County. He succeeds Candace Rondeaux, who went to Foreign to cover Pakistan and Afghanistan.”

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of Society for Science & the Public, has named Tosh Arimura circulation manager.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Throughout the campaign, the media have treated Paul as a footnote. Snickering pundits all but dismissed him as a cranky kook, in the tradition of another Lone Star State insurgent, Ross Perot. Even when the mainstream publications covered him, you could imagine the assignment editors rolling their eyes in amusement, like parents patronizing a child. Yet anyone who looked hard enough knew that there was more to Paul than an inability to amass delegates. Most of the media, turned off by his shrill libertarian leanings, missed the real news value of Paul’s story — namely, the Texas congressman’s ability to connect intensely with voters.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows,Hillary Clinton’s retraction of her claim that she came under sniper fire while visiting Bosnia in 1996 was one of the main campaign storylines last week. But the controversy over her statements did not resonate as widely as the furor over statements made by Barack Obama’s pastor earlier in March. Four-in-ten Americans heard a lot about Clinton’s claim that she came under sniper fire, compared with 51% who had heard a lot about Rev. Wright’s sermons the week before.”
  • “Results from the Dow Jones Insight — 2008 Presidential Election Media Pulse show that Barack Obama’s pivotal race speech on March 18 may have helped mitigate that week’s controversy surrounding the remarks of Reverend Jeremiah Wright, shifting attention back to the issues of the economy and the upcoming Pennsylvania primary.”

  • CJR reports, “Business news is booming these days. Business-news sections not so much. They are disappearing and have been doing so regularly for months. The trend seems set to continue.”

  • Washington Blade editor’s Kevin Naff asks, “Why did editor Len Downie go to such lengths to hide the simple fact that a soldier was gay?”

  • Huffington Post has a “Eulogy for Dead Trees”

  • “As Katharine Weymouth, granddaughter of the legendary Katharine Graham, takes over as publisher of the Washington Post,” The Washingtonian has some “suggestions for her agenda, based on interviews with subscribers and Post staffers.”

  • Romenesko reports, “WSJ changes news desk structure”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Veteran newsman Roger Mudd” reports the “five best” “essential works about journalism.”

  • Joel Achenbach writes, “Let’s have a blog item today that’s not about me and my personal obsessions and neuroses. Instead, let’s talk about the general plight of all those middle-aged newspaper reporters out there who, at the age of 47, are just barely too young to get the buyout offer. Clearly it is time for these people to think about the next big career move.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “I’ve said many times that Barack Obama has gotten easy treatment from the news media, although that has changed a bit in recent weeks, particularly since the Rev. Jeremiah Wright became a household name, at least in households that watch plenty of cable. In fact, there’s a bit of a narrative about Obama as an elitist starting to take hold in the media, and that could prove troublesome for him.”

  • New York Time’s Public Editor writes, “Change Can Be Painful, but This One Shouldn’t Hurt”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Most regular local readers of The Post read it on newsprint. And when they want something in the paper and it’s not there, they usually don’t like me telling them to find it on washingtonpost.com.”

  • Washington City Paper’s Mike DeBonis asks, “Has Adrian Fenty reneged on his campaign tax pledge?”

  • Check out The Best of Cox 2008 winners.

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, March 30, 2008 in all categories.”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for First quarter 2008, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Major television networks are privately saying that if they have to worry about a fine every time someone utters a profanity on air, they may have to stop real-time broadcasting of live events such as the Academy Awards and Grammys. At the same time, the head of the Federal Communications Commission and parents groups are saying that if the Supreme Court removes the threat, ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox will seize the opportunity to make the airwaves more coarse and profane.”

  • 23/6 has the “Inappropriate Hottie Rundown: Racially Diverse Pundit Edition”

  • Forbes.com reports, “Forty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Tom Brokaw is making sure his legacy isn’t forgotten. In King, a two-hour television documentary premiering on the History Channel April 6, the award-winning newsman talks to everyone from Bill Clinton to Forest Whitaker to Dr. King’s son Martin Luther King III about the legendary civil rights figure.”

  • TVNewser reported on Friday, “Megan Henderson, morning anchor at Fox O&O KDFW, will be co-hosting Fox & Friends this weekend.”

  • The AP reports, “Early Mike Wallace interviews now online”

  • “TVNewser received several tips wondering what happened during the 6:30 feed of Friday’s NBC Nightly News. Brian Williams was anchoring from Memphis to mark the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Williams began the broadcast with a live interview with Sen. John McCain. What they didn’t expect was a crowd behind them with speeches blaring through loudspeakers.”

  • A tipster tells us from Friday, “Bill Press speaking to an irate caller on today’s ‘Washington Journal’: ‘Chris Matthews is in the tank for Barack Obama, but don’t blame it on me.’

  • “CNN Crosses Paths With Clinton, Grabs Impromptu Interview,” TVNewser reports.

  • From a TVNewser tipster: ‘I understand that there is a move afoot to develop a legal television network in place of CourtTV.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last night’s Daily Show with Jon Stewart featured a glance at Sen. Barack Obama’s recent media tour. Some got snubbed, some got cozy and some were ‘thrilled’ to spend an hour with the candidate…until hearts were broken.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com continues to achieve record-breaking traffic in March 2008. In March, ABCNEWS.com scored another high traffic month, reaching nearly 23 million uniques, an increase of 69% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. The site also garnered 207.4 million page views, up 44% from the previous year and marked four consecutive months of record page view growth. In March, the site increased video views by 123% compared to the same time last year, according to ABC.”

  • This Wednesday is the Blogger’s Happy Hour Bash at Velocity Five Restaurant. For more info, click here.

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “Is the Huffington Post really a $200 million company? Monday’s New York Times story about the fast-growing group blog/news aggregator left a lot of people wondering about that eye-catching number, reportedly the price the company uses in its internal discussions about the possibility of a sale. The consensus, among those who know about some matters: No, the Huffington Post is not remotely worth $200 million.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Google Inc. confirmed Thursday it bid in the recent government spectrum auction in an effort to wring higher competing bids out of Verizon Wireless and open up a large chunk of the airwaves to outside Internet devices.”

  • Reuters reports, “News Corp’s Fox Interactive Media Internet division could fall short of its fiscal 2008 revenue target of $1 billion, as it reorganizes its divisions to better exploit the online advertising market.”

  • ABC.com asks, “Should Drudge and Huffington Get Pulitzers?”

  • The Swamp reports, “It’s an introspective week for The Swamp. First we rolled out a new look and invited critiques. Now, some university researchers are asking whether we — and newspaper political blogs across the Web — should exist at all.”

  • Guardian’s greenslade reports, “I have argued for some time that the internet will free us from media mogul domination. Oddly, Rupert Murdoch has said much the same thing, a clue that I was being more than a shade optimistic. Now comes evidence that the democratising force of the net is anything but a given.”

  • Gannett Blog reports, “The non-profit Freedom Forum’s most recent tax return shows that it paid Founder Al Neuharth $225,000 in 2006, plus gave him a $200,545 expense account — the biggest such account of any officer, director or trustee. Neuharth, 84, who recently groused about his diminished mental capacity, worked 40 hours a week for Freedom Forum, the return shows.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The weekly newsmagazines have been declared dinosaurs as far back as the late 1980s. But now that 111 employees at Washington Post Co.’s Newsweek have taken buyouts, including many longtime editors, it’s clear that their cultures are finally being blown up and reinvented. And some say that’s not such a bad thing.”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will host “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today. The show can be heard on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm.

  • Radio Ink reports, “In a letter to FCC Chairman Kevin Martin, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) notes that, although the Department of Justice has unconditionally approved the merger of XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio, ‘serious concerns remain as to how this merger will impact consumers if it is permiited to go forward.’”

  • FBLA Exclusive: Interview with Randi Rhodes’ Ex-Writer Barry Crimmins

  • NPR announced, “A special edition of NPR’s news-talk program Talk of the Nation will broadcast live from the Newseum on Tuesday, April 8, 2:00-4:00PM (ET). This broadcast — the first live national program from the new Washington, D.C.-based interactive museum of news – is part of the Newseum’s press preview day, in advance of its public opening on Friday, April 11, and will have a studio audience.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Just as the Eliot Spitzer sex scandal became the ultimate water-cooler conversation topic — if only for a few days — Sirius Satellite Radio launched Client 9 Radio, a 24/7 all-Spitzer channel, but just for a few days.”

  • New York Times reports, “In what would be the latest twist in the increasingly contentious battle over the $20 billion buyout of Clear Channel Communications, hedge fund clients of the banks balking at financing the deal are reportedly threatening to pull their business if the banks don’t move ahead with the deal for the radio broadcaster.”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • E&P reports, ” In a harsh press release, The White House slammed The New York Times for a Thursday column that criticized President Bush’s reaction to the economic crisis.”

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    EVENTS

  • Julie Ocean played at the Rock n Roll Hotel saturday night. Teh band’s CD comes out May 13. Check out their website here.

  • A release announced, “Andrea Rodgers, President and CEO of The Courage Cup, an IRS designated 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation established to help at-risk urban youth, is pleased to announce that Legal Times is inviting Washington law firms to attend Meadow Matches and participate in a Charity Segway Polo Challenge. This exciting day of polo matches will bring Washington’s legal community together for a day of charity in the picturesque Virginia Piedmont.”

  • PDN Pulse offers, “A Sneak Peek At The Newseum”

  • USAToday reports, “Massive Newseum opens window on journalism”

  • Kurtz reports, “At Sparkly Newseum, The Glory Of the Story Goes Above the Fold”

  • Lorraine Ahearn writes, “Determined to make the news ‘fun’ and ‘fresh,’ the Newseum has something for everyone. A 100-foot-wide screen lets visitors experience for themselves what it’s like to be interviewed by, say, Charlie Rose — with the help of 3-D glasses and complimentary Breathe-Right strips.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Unlike that bombastic structure, the journalism museum makes no attempt to bow and scrape to classical traditions. It is sheathed in glass, not masonry, to reveal some of its activity inside and counter the sealed-up monumentality so prevalent in Washington.”

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    BOOKS

  • The Washington City Paper writes, “For decades, D.C. has been hurting for a classic novel all its own. Some suggestions on how to make it.”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Latin America Deputy Regional Editor and a Global Media Services (GMS) Unit Manager.

  • YMCA of Metropolitan Washington is looking for a Communications Specialist.

  • Greenpeace Inc. is looking for a Media Relations Director and a Graphic Designer.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist ,Group Retention & Billing.

  • Forbes.com is looking for an Unpaid Intern.

  • Association of American Medical Colleges is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.26.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s Nancy Pelosi’s birthday!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • This election cycle has changed how you view Bill Clinton — in a bad way.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Crain’s Chicago Business reports, “Tribune Co. named Chandler Bigelow as chief financial officer, effectively immediately, to succeed Don Grenesko, who retired Monday.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Barack Obama’s 37-minute March 18 address on race relations was the major event in a week in which he easily dominated the battle for media exposure, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study of campaign coverage from March 17-23.”

  • Just How Did John McCain Obtain What He Has in the Bank with the Press?” And “The Maverick and the Media

  • Modern Art Notes reports, “Washington Post, Pollack revisit an old stereotype”

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    TV

  • Behind in the Ratings, CBS News Hopes for Help From a Debate

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Jeremy Hubbard has been named co-anchor of ABC News’ early morning news programs ‘World News Now’ and ‘America This Morning,’ News President David Westin announced today. In addition to this role, Mr. Hubbard will contribute reports to all other ABC News’ broadcasts and platforms.”

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the number one evening newscast among Adults 25-54 for the week of March 17-21. The ABC News broadcast averaged a 2.2/9 and 2.65 million among Adults 25-54, outperforming NBC’s “Nightly News” by 80,000. Week-to-week, ‘World News” advantage over NBC increased 33% in the key demo. Additionally, this marks the thirteenth time this season the ABC broadcast has finished first among Adults 25-54.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 17, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 8.920 million total viewers, +456,000 more than ABC ‘World News” 8.464 million, and +2.302 million more than CBS ‘Evening News” 6.618 million. Season-to-date ‘Nightly’ leads ABC by +227K viewers. CBS ‘Evening News’ numbers are based on a three-day average for the week due to the NCAA tournament.”

  • WWD.com reports, “As shareholders prepare to gather for Time Warner Inc.’s annual meeting on May 16, 12 stockholding organizations have a proposal up for a vote that the post of chairman and chief executive officer be split. The proposal states that it is often in shareholders’ best interests to separate the positions, as conflicts of interest arise when one person holds both posts.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Economic slowdown hits Hollywood”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Rob Goodspeed asks, “Is PostPoints Worth It?” and discovered, “A quick look at the rewards dampened my enthusiasm. A $10 CVS gift card looked like a useful prize. However, at 3,385 points it would take me 677 days of Express reading or almost one year of reading both a print publication and the website to earn enough points to earn it.”

  • Reuters reports, “Virtual beer and vampires may no longer be enough to keep members of social networks like Facebook and News Corp’s MySpace riveted to their computers. Instead, the key to the future of these Web sites may lie in more practical functions, such as making plans, booking tickets or checking stock quotes.”

  • Dallas Business Journal reports, “American Airlines Inc. is hoping to win customers by becoming the first major airline to launch an application for users of the social networking Web site Facebook. American, owned by Fort Worth-based AMR Corp. (NYSE: AMR), said its application, called Travel Bag, lets Facebook users share travel experiences with friends, offer and read reviews on restaurants and shops, and create countdowns for upcoming events or trips.”

  • FastCompany.com reports, “On the verge of a revival last year, AOL suddenly imploded. The inside story of a journey to nowhere.”

  • The Independent reports, “Apax has cooled its interest in the £1.25bn auction for Reed Business Information (RBI), the publisher. Rivals United Business Media and Informa have already indicated that they are not interested in the auction.”

  • Jupiter Research reports, “Big Trend for 2008 Online Media: Re-Inventing the Network”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Tonight, join Reason for a happy hour at The Fab Lounge (1805 Connecticut Ave., NW 2nd floor), at 6.30PM. Reason’s Radley Balko, Nick Gillespie, Dan Hayes, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Michael C. Moynihan, Jesse Walker, David Weigel and Matt Welch will all be there to celebrate the publication of the magazine’s April issue, as well as the “advent of spring, with its attendant flowers and sunshiney days.”

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    RADIO

  • “DCRTV hears that recently-yanked MSNBC show host Tucker Carlson will be filling-in for David Burd on 3WT from 5:30 AM to 8 AM on Wednesday. He’ll be joining Jessica Doyle and Victoria Jones.”

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    JOBS

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Producer, Web Franchise Programming.

  • Center For Independent Media is looking for a Deputy National Editorial Director.

  • Al Jazeera is looking for an Output Producer and a Planning Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.19.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • The Oscars are your favorite awards show.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of the Society for Science & the Public, has named Jonathan Oleisky its new associate publisher.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Readers are super-sensitive to any perceived slight to their favorite candidate — from Page 1 display to photos to the details of graphics. And they want guidance from The Post in issues coverage and editorial endorsements before they vote. Several readers were unhappy that on last Sunday’s front page, Sen. Barack Obama’s Feb. 9 primary victories were played below a story on the Washington Redskins naming Jim Zorn as head coach.”

  • William McGurn on “Press Corps Quagmire

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Now that pending layoffs at the New York Times and Los Angeles Times have made newsroom cutbacks all but unanimous, some managers eager to maximize the feet on the street at their newspapers are wondering if they really need all those editors.”

  • A release announced, “The International Center for Journalists, the Washington-based nonprofit organization, is seeking nominations for the 2008 Knight International Journalism Awards. The Awards recognize international journalists who demonstrate an extraordinary devotion to the craft by upholding the highest journalistic standards despite overwhelming challenges.”

  • Crains New York reports, “On the heels of a 13% plunge in December’s advertising revenue, The New York Times said last week that it would cut 100 newsroom jobs over the course of this year. The paper isn’t the only suffering media business. Radio ad revenue for the New York marketplace took a slide in January, and television insiders predict a low-single-digit ad revenue drop in the first quarter for the local marketplace. Add magazines to the mix: Some are seeing the bottom fall out of their ad page counts.”

  • “Pundit Police Watch News Talkers

  • Stephen Hunter talks about his heart attack.

  • Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson asks, “Are the news media being beastly to Hillary Clinton? Are political reporters and commentators — as Bill Clinton suggested but didn’t quite come out and say in a radio interview Tuesday — basically in the tank for Barack Obama?” In response, Terence Smith writes, “Gene’s answer: no and no. My view: yes and yes.”

  • The New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “Three articles in The Times last month raised an intriguing question: When does fairness demand that a newspaper walk down the middle in a scientific dispute, and when does responsibility demand that it take sides? It is hardly a new question, and The Times, historically, has been slow to declare victors.”

  • A release announced, “The American Society of Newspaper Editors has selected the winners of its annual awards for distinguished writing and photography.” Among the winners are Anne Hull and Dana Priest, The Washington Post for their stories “exposing the deep and widespread problems at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.”

  • Edward Wasserman, the Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University, writes, “Beneath the somber tales of shrinking revenues and staff cuts is an even more somber reality about the news business: The nearly two-century-old marriage between consumer advertising and journalism is on the rocks.”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “Coverage Adds to Clinton’s Steep Climb”

  • The New Yorker reports, “few days before Senator Barack Obama swept the Democratic primaries in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, people across the country, picking up their favorite newspaper, were greeted with the following headline: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Big Part In Obama’s Young Life. In any event, that’s what some readers thought they read. On second glance, they realized their mistake. The headline actually said this: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Bit Part In Obama’s Young Life. Maybe, though, the mistake wasn’t just the readers’, especially the bleary-eyed among them who hadn’t yet had their morning coffee. After all, it wasn’t exactly news that ‘drugs’ had played a part (and only a ‘bit part’ at that) in the adolescence of the junior senator from Illinois. That particular factoid had been on the public record for more than twelve years. And if it wasn’t news, what was it doing on the front page of the New York Times?”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has acquired $60 million worth of shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. over the past three weeks as part of its push to grow its education business.”

  • Market Watch reports, “A pair of hedge funds seeking representation on the board of directors of New York Times Co. disclosed on Thursday that they have raised their stake in the media company above 10%. Firebrand Partners and Harbinger Capital Partners reported holding 15.1 million New York Times shares, or a 10.54% stake, after a Harbinger fund bought 441,100 Class A shares for $17.62 a share on Tuesday. The funds had previously reported holding 14.25 million shares for a 9.96% stake.”

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    TV

  • Do we have too many pundits? Paul Farhi looks into it.

  • A CNN release announced, “This Week in Politics will move to the 6 p.m. (ET) time slot on Saturdays beginning this weekend. The one-hour program, anchored by Tom Foreman, previously aired at 7 p.m. on Saturdays.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Some Shuster Defense on Rival Networks”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “It’s official: The strike drove writers nuts. No, not TV and film writers. Journalists. Fourteen weeks of covering bitter trench warfare between the Writers Guild of America and the studios, and the ink-stained wretches are feeling wretched. It’s not just that covering a complex, polarizing news story for more than three months left them fried. The worst part has been the blowback. And we don’t mean from the studios and networks, either. No, friends, it’s the ugliest kind of warfare: writer on writer.”

  • TVNewser reported this weekend, “This morning on Fox & Friends Weekend, an entirely new group of anchors graced the FNC screen. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris greeted viewers at 7amET. Johnny Dollar has some clips of the trio’s first day.”

  • From Playbook: “ABC’s Ann Compton e-mails that when President Bush landed today in rural Arusha, Tanzania, in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, he was greeted by Masai tribal dancers, hundreds of cheering Africans lining the — and three people, standing apart, waving OBAMA signs. ‘Not certain whether Bush saw them,’ Ann writes. ‘Just bought Mike Allen a ZEBRA — bringing it home on press plane. Really!’”

  • Washington Post reports, “In Washington, politics and the press always manage to inject themselves into the proceedings, even at a music awards show honoring the best and brightest on the local music scene. So at a long-standing music awards ceremony like the Wammies, you pretty much expect that at some point, CBS newsman Bob Schieffer is going to take to the stage. After all, there is no moment more quintessential D.C., more inside-the-Beltway, than the sight of Schieffer — who won a Spotlight Award last night — rocking at the mike with the local band Honky Tonk Confidential, speak-singing with a country-western twang a little ditty called ‘TV Anchorman.’ He also extolled the wonders of the ‘American dream’ — and promised that after the presidential inauguration next year he’ll forswear TV life for a full-time music career.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “ABC newsman Bob Woodruff’s long recovery from a brain injury suffered in an IED attack in 2006 in Iraq is turning a new page. Literally. He tells us that in the upcoming paperback version of his hit book, In an Instant, his kids will write of how they dealt with their father’s injury, coma, and recovery.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington Post reports,Barry Schuler moved to Washington from Silicon Valley to join AOL during its golden days, one of the many top technology professionals the Internet giant recruited to the region. But when the former chief executive left in 2003, he returned to California to become an investor and start a technology company, following other executives who have drifted away from the region. … Departures like Schuler’s are one reason Washington’s technology industry is still struggling to mature a decade after Dulles-based AOL became a magnet for talent.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Media Work Force Sinks to 15-Year Low”

  • The Guardian reports, “Media companies including the BBC, Channel 4, Google, Yahoo and social-networking site Bebo have signed up to a new code of conduct … designed to give parents more information about the suitability for children of audiovisual content available on the internet and mobile phones.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “With recession talk in the air, marketers are scrutinizing their spending. But old, reliable tricks such as counting on coupons to goose sales might not work this time around. Luckily, cheaper options abound in emerging media such as mobile, e-mail and search.”

  • Variety reports, “Amid all the recent headlines about tie-ups and acquisitions involving Yahoo, Microsoft, Google and Facebook, one player continues to look more like a perpetual bridesmaid than bride. Few could dispute that AOL, the onetime buyer of Time Warner, has become a burr under its parent company’s saddle financially. Q4 2007 results released Feb. 6 showed an array of less-than-scintillating numbers. Division revenue slipped below 10% of the conglom’s total for the first quarter since 2000. Fiscal-year operating profit was just 14% of the total. Display ad revenue gained just 3% for the quarter, to $252 million, and paid search rose only 1%.”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “The Right Strengthens its Hold on McCain, the Media Refuse to Notice”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Reed Elsevier, the Anglo-Dutch media group, is drawing up plans to axe more than 1,000 jobs as part of a continuing efficiency drive, The Sunday Telegraph has learned. The company, which owns the LexisNexis information service and the medical journal, The Lancet, is understood to be preparing to cut the jobs over the next couple of years as it centralises functions such as procurement, human resources and IT across the group. Analysts expect the job cuts — the majority of which will take place outside Britain — to contribute to a restructuring that will shed as much as £100m from Reed’s annual costs bill. It is unclear whether the cuts will be acknowledged formally in its annual results announcement on Wednesday.”

  • Kiplinger.com’s Business Resource Center launched a new Politics blog. Check it out here.

  • The Telegraph reports, “AOL, the American internet company, is attempting to piece together a deal with Yahoo! designed to help the Silicon Valley-based search engine evade the clutches of Microsoft, the world’s biggest software group”

  • New York Times reports, “In the middle of a media-saturated political season, Jared Kushner, publisher of The New York Observer, has been quietly nurturing an ambitious political journalism venture. The plan is to pull together 50 Web sites, one for each state, into a political hub called Politicker.com. Each site will serve as an intensely local source for political articles, speculation and scandal, Mr. Kushner said.”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “Illinois Shooting Tragedy Pushes Election Off The Top, Mostly”

  • Chris Cillizza admits, “The Fix is a non-voter — for a few reasons”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Washington Monthly may team up with Common Cause.

  • “In the press, Hillary has been trapped by her own story, whereas Obama has been freed by his,” writes John Heilemann.

  • New York Post reports, “While magazine circulation inched up an average of just 1.1 percent in the second half of 2007, a few magazines with innovative approaches and partnerships managed to beat the odds.”

  • The Feed reports, “Time magazine senior political analyst Mark Halperin joined a small, yet growing club this week, when he issued an apology for saying John Edwards considered Barack Obama ‘kind of a pussy’ on a satellite radio talk show.”

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    RADIO

  • FMQB reports, “Clear Channel Communications released its 2007 and Q4 fiscal results, with the company’s quarterly profit up 51.7 percent. Earnings in the quarter jumped from $211 in 2006 to $320 million in 2007. Revenue was up four percent to $1.84 billion. For the entire year, revenue was up six percent to $6.82 billion. Net income increased by 37 percent to $938.5 million.”

  • Canadian Business reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. spent roughly $1.2 million in 2007 to lobby for approval of its proposed $5 billion acquisition by rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., among other issues. The satellite radio operator spent $580,000 in the second half of 2007 to lobby Congress and the Department of Justice about the pending merger, according to a disclosure form posted online Tuesday by the Senate’s public records office.”

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    BOOKS

  • Newsweek asks, “What to make of ‘Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks From the Wild Web’? The new book, edited by Sarah Boxer, the New York Times’s first (now former) ‘Web critic,’ endeavors to compile an anthology of the best posts from the best Web logs. ‘W,’ you might ask, ‘TF?’ To what end this dead-tree blogroll? Is this a sincere attempt to explain the blogging phenomenon-which some estimate is, in its current form, more than 15 years old to off-the-grid grandmas across America? Or is this compilation a cynical ploy to cash in on free content?”

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Television Producer-Writer.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for a Financial Services Reporter.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Web Producer and a Web Editor.

  • Summit Business Media is looking for a DC Reporter for Credit Union Times Magazine.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.05.08

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    Happy Super Tuesday Washington! Better yet, it’s Bobby Brown’s birthday!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | JOBS

  • Most of you wake up a couple of times during the night.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • “For news media, the emergence of Bill Clinton as a key public player in the presidential campaign of his wife, Sen. Hillary Clinton, raises unusual coverage issues,” writes Edward Wasserman is Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University, in the Miami Herald.

  • blog.pmarca is “Inaugurating the New York Times Deathwatch

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “With the broadcast networks taking various amounts of prime time hours for coverage and the cable networks going from dawn to early Wednesday morning with live coverage, the TV time for Super Tuesday results will be huge.”

  • ICFJ asks, “Is ‘fake’ news more honest than ‘real’ news?”

  • “C-SPAN will air LIVE coverage of Super Tuesday, with results throughout the evening, in-studio guests, live coverage of the candidates speeches in their entirety, and viewer phone calls.” Also, “C-SPAN 2 will simulcast live election coverage from CBS News Radio, accompanied by graphics listing results from all 24 states with Super Tuesday contests as they happen.”

  • A CNN release announced the network’s Super Tuesday coverage. “CNN’s Best Political Team on Television goes around the clock with 40 hours of non-stop political programming and employs the most innovative presentation of election results in history for its coverage of Super Tuesday. Based at the CNN Election Center in New York and with top political correspondents and analysts positioned in key battleground states across the nation, lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer, joined by Lou Dobbs, Anderson Cooper, Soledad O’Brien and Campbell Brown, will guide the network’s special coverage, along with CNN’s team of political analysts and reporters. In addition, the CNN Election Center undergoes its biggest test of the election season to date as voters in 24 states head to the polls.”

  • A release announced, “PBS and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer will provide complete coverage of the results with a three hour live special broadcast anchored by Jim Lehrer starting at 9pm ET.”

  • A Bloomberg release announced, “Bloomberg News will deliver nonstop multimedia coverage of Super Tuesday late into night via Bloomberg Television, Bloomberg Radio andBloomberg.com and on the Bloomberg Professional service. As voters cast their ballots in the Democratic and Republican primaries and caucuses, Bloomberg will provide comprehensive Super Tuesday coverage from New York, Washington and Bloomberg’s network of bureaus across the nation and around the world. Bloomberg viewers and listeners will be kept up to date on Wall Street’s reaction with reports and interviews.”

  • TVNewser reports, “And while the news networks of News Corp. get their mugs on Fox, John King shows his own mug, during CNN’s Ballot Bowl coverage. The Dorchester, MA native is a partisan when it comes to the Super Bowl.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Variety reports, “Newsweek and the Washington Post are betting that Super Tuesday warrants extra Web attention. On the night when some 50% of presidential primaries and caucuses occur, Newsweek and the Post will be putting their big editorial guns in front of webcams for six continuous hours of live coverage, which the BBC will simulcast to its stations around the world.”

  • A release announced, “AccuWeather, Inc. today announced the launch of its ‘get out the vote’ campaign titled Forecast Your Future: Vote! The campaign includes PSAs to be shown on the Local AccuWeather Channel digital-tier cable network and on the leading weather web site, AccuWeather.com. The PSAs feature well-known on-air talent encouraging viewers to influence their own political ‘forecasts’ by exercising their rights as U.S. citizens to vote in the ongoing primaries and upcoming presidential elections.”

  • Fortune reports, “Two years ago, AOL was the belle of the Internet ball as its owner, Time Warner, entertained teams of suitors hoping to cozy up to the once-dominant Web portal. Microsoft offered to buy half of AOL, but the board of Time Warner demurred. Yahoo offered to acquire the company with stock, which was also a non-starter. In the end Time Warner settled on a deal under which search giant Google invested $1 billion in AOL in exchange for running its search business.”

  • CNet News reports, “AOL announced on Monday that it has purchased Goowy Media, a company that has created technology for widget creation and analytics reporting. AOL has been partnering with Goowy since early in 2007; financial terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.”

  • Valley Wag reports, “Yahoo deal spells a sale for MSNBC.com.” And, “Insiders say no way on MSNBC.com sale.”

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    RADIO

  • DCRTV reports,Don Herbert, a longtime Los Angeles news radio anchor who once worked at WTOP, died on 2/2 of complications from colon surgery. He was 72. Herbert, whose real name was Herbert Rosenbaum, worked at WTOP before moving to LA to become one of KFWB’s original anchors upon its debut as an all-newser in 1968.”

  • Inside The Beltway reports, “Talk about a political track record: How about this observation from Chris Berry, president and general manager for Washington’s WMAL-630 AM: ‘We have broadcast presidential election results since Herbert Hoover beat Al Smith in the presidential election of 1928.’ Meanwhile, the news/talk radio station will produce the first live remote radio broadcast from the still-yet-to-open Newseum for Super Tuesday as presidential primary and caucus returns from 24 states are tabulated. The 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. hosts are Chris Core and Chris Plante.”

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    JOBS

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for an Editorial Intern.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Most of you don’t even wear a watch anymore.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • John Hendren and Jose Antonio Vargas shared a birthday this weekend.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, said fourth-quarter profit declined 31 percent as advertisers cut holiday spending and its television stations sold fewer political ads.”

  • The AP reports, “The board of directors of The Associated Press gave final approval to a new pricing plan Thursday that will overhaul how the news cooperative’s services are packaged and sold to its newspaper members. The changes, which received initial approval from the board in October, will result in about $6 million in savings to AP’s newspaper members when they take effect Jan. 1, 2009, the company said in a statement.”

  • Press duels with Obama over access

  • Politico reports, “With presidential candidates dropping like flies, the television networks are pouring more resources into covering the most famous non-candidate on the campaign trail: Bill Clinton. Now, all the major players — NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox and CNN — have producers on the President Clinton beat, most joining within the past two weeks.”

  • Silicon Alley Insider reports, “When News Corp. bought Dow Jones and the Wall Street Journal last year, part of the rationale was that Rupert Murdoch could use the WSJ’s reporters to help bolster its fledgling Fox Businesss Network — but not for a while. That’s because the WSJ and GE’s CNBC had already signed a contract that gives the cable network the exclusive rights to the Journal’s talent through 2012. Or not. Fox Business now looks set on exploiting what it says is a loophole in the CNBC deal: Fox Business Network EVP Kevin Magee says he thinks he can use WSJ reporters and editors, after all.”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “A Jan. 7 essay on Jewish identity, published on washingtonpost.com’s popular On Faith site, caused a furor and led to two public apologies, a lost job and much recrimination.”

  • New York Times’ readers react to William Kristol.

  • Dan Steinberg writes, “When I saw Dan Hellie walk into the media room this morning looking like he had just taken a few crosses to his temple, I immediately thought…..well, you all can guess what I thought. But no, it turns out Hellie was headbutted yesterday while playing pick-up hoops in Bethesda. The wound required 14 stitches to patch up.”

  • A release announced, “The Los Angeles Times editorial board has endorsed Senator John McCain and Senator Barack Obama in this year’s presidential primary election, marking the first such endorsement since 1972.” Check out the full endorsement here.

  • AlterNet’s Nick Bromell writes, “At some point in our lives, we all dream of playing in the big leagues. But what if our fantasies came true? What if we were suddenly plucked from our crabgrass and dead clover and dropped magically onto the emerald outfield of Yankee Stadium? What would we feel — ecstasy or terror? I suspect that something like this happened to David Brooks when he was summoned from the obscure nook of the Weekly Standard and asked to write a regular op-ed column for the New York Times. Here was someone who had edited a cranky right-wing journal and written a clever book poking fun at baby-boomer bohemians suddenly being required to render informed opinion on everything from global warming to stem-cell research. Is it any wonder that for the past three years we have watched a drowning man flounder in a froth of chatty drivel?Fortunately, his legions of exasperated readers don’t have to wonder whether he’ll ever get his just reward. The truth is that Brooks is already being punished. Deep beneath his protective sheath of psychic blubber, he knows what the Wizard of Oz knew — that he’s a fake and a failure.”

  • Washington Whispers reports on one journo’s opinion of Sen. Barack Obama. “Another reporter, Chicago Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet, has worked out beside the candidate and describes him as ‘studious and serious, thorough and businesslike.’”

  • Khaled Hosseini writes in the Wall Street Journal, “Ever since the post-9/11 American invasion, the Afghan government has taken great pains to distance itself from the oppressive and unforgiving rule of the Taliban. Afghan leaders have pointed to greater personal freedom and improvements in infrastructure, education and health care as successes of the country’s nascent democracy. But last week we learned that Sayed Parwez Kaambakhsh, a young journalism student, has been sentenced to death for distributing an article that, religious clerics in Afghanistan say, violates the tenets of Islam.”

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    TV

  • A Clinton campaign release announced, “veteran journalist Carole Simpson will serve as moderator for Hillary’s Voices Across America: A National Town Hall. The three-time Emmy award winner will join Hillary at the anchor event in New York. The town hall will be broadcast live on Hallmark Channel and online on the eve of Super Tuesday, Monday, February 4, 2008 at 9 p.m. EST.”

  • A release announced, “The Comcast Network on Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. as CN8 Political Director Lynn Doyle hosts a special three-hour edition of ‘It’s Your Call,’ featuring live, expert analysis of Super Tuesday and the 24 state primary elections taking place that day. The coverage follows CN8′s launch of ‘America’s Next President,’ the network’s most expansive election package to date tracking all major events leading up to the presidential election.”

  • ABC’s David Muir sat down with Sen. Barack Obama. The interview aired this weekend on ABC’s World News Saturday.

  • TVNewser reports, “In addition to coverage on BBC World News America, CNN International and Euro News, MSNBC is getting into the international game this Super Tuesday. NBC has signed an agreement with Channel NewsAsia to carry the network’s coverage from 6pmET Tuesday night to 6amET Wednesday morning.”

  • TVNewser reports, “From politics to parties; from Hooters girls to the President of the United States, FNC’s two hours on the Fox broadcast network this morning accomplished what it set out to do: ‘explore the social impact of the Super Bowl and how it intertwines with politics.’ That line from the press release is about as dry as the Arizona desert. Fox Super Sunday, however, was more exciting.”

  • B&C reports, “Nobody was happier to see John Edwards drop out of the presidential race last week than CNN. That’s because it set up what many Americans—and CNN—wanted to see last Thursday: a one-on-one debate between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. And while the debate didn’t turn into the slugfest many expected, it set the stage for a riveting Super Tuesday matchup between the top Democratic candidates.”

  • The Guardian reports, “Al-Jazeera’s troubled English language news channel is facing a ‘serious staffing crisis’ after scores of journalists left or have not had contracts renewed amid claims of a revolt over working conditions.”

  • From B&C, check out “some thoughts, notes and quotes that didn’t make it into this week’s Left Coast Bias column on spending the day with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer at Thursday’s Democratic debate at the Kodak Theater in Los Angeles.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Last December, conservative author and CNN election analyst William J. Bennett gave over two thousand dollars to Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaign, a fact that Bennett has not mentioned during any of his appearances on the network, according to a review of transcripts by the Huffington Post.”

  • TVNewser reports, Jon Stewart’s take on The Situation Room’s multitude of monitors, with a special appearance from Spongebob.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS and ABC joined Fox to ask the Supreme Court not to review a lower-court decision that essentially took the Federal Communications Commission to the woodshed for failing to justify its crackdown on fleeting profanity.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipster tells us about a situation in New Hampshire (which seems like a really long time ago, now) during the coverage of the primary there. MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was talking with a New Hampshire politician about the state of things in Washington. Matthews told the local pol, ‘Nothing will get done in Washington until there is a large enough majority in the Senate — maybe I’ll run for Senate.’ After explaining he was from Pennsylvania, Matthews said, ‘Casey pulled it off so it’s do-able.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox News Channel ends January with 8 of the top 10 programs. CNN’s Larry King Live (8th) and Lou Dobbs Tonight (10th) filled out the top 10. MSNBC’s highest rated show Countdown with Keith Olbermann came in 19th.”

  • CNN Dem Debate Most Watched in Cable History

  • His Extreme-ness wrote last week, “Send Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton to the freedom of speech woodshed. Boy, did they exhibit a fundamental misunderstanding of C-SPAN during last night’s debate”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is going to begin Super Tuesday coverage a couple hours early” on Monday night. “The Super Tuesday preview will be anchored by Dan Abrams from 10-11pmET, and by Norah O’Donnell and David Shuster from 11-Midnight.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reid Wilson’s birthday was Saturday!

  • “KassyK” is leaving D.C.

  • Radar Online reports, “One of the joys of the presidential campaign season is that it allows the Washington press corps to ignore even more substantive stories than usual. With so many reporters detached to the campaign trail, dozens of big stories are either left to the wire services or ignored altogether. Last week the press buried two big stories about how many times the Bush administration has lied in public, and how it has covered up those lies in private. They belonged on the front page.”

  • Salon’s Joe Conason asks, “Will the press get over its love for McCain?”

  • AlterNet reports, James Glassman, the nominee for Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy, probably won’t have much of an impact on how the United States presents itself to the rest of the world. For one thing, he’ll only have 11 months in the post. For another — as his predecessor Karen Hughes proved — putting shinier lipstick on the pig of U.S. foreign policy doesn’t do much to assuage widespread anti-American sentiment. Still, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s January 30 hearing on Glassman’s nomination provided some insight into Washington’s evolving view of public diplomacy.”

  • A release announced, “ABC News NOW’s wall-to-wall coverage of the Super Tuesday Presidential primaries and caucuses will be available LIVE on the Homepage and the Politics section of ABCNEWS.com. Coverage will begin on Tuesday, February 5 at 7:00 p.m., ET and continue through at least 12:15 a.m., ET to report results across all time zones, including California, where polls close at 11:00 p.m., ET.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “As j-schools struggle to keep the skills they teach relevant to the fast-changing media landscape, hundreds other journalists and students have mobilized to teach and support each other informally through a new online social network. Wired Journalists was recently created by Ryan Sholin of GateHouse Media, using Ning (a free set of tools for rolling your own social network). As of this morning, the group has 778 members. Many of them appear to be 20-somethings (j-school students or recent grads) — but there are some gray-hairs there, as well as some notable luminaries from the field.”

  • For Super Tuesday, washingtonpost.com will have six hours of live online-only video coverage and analysis of the results as they come in.

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    MAGAZINES

  • Media Life reports, “Magazine publishing in the U.S. may have become gloomy for certain categories, but worldwide it’s in healthy shape, with emerging markets making up for the slowdowns in mature markets like the U.S. And the picture for magazines worldwide looks brighter still going forward, even if they’re not seeing anywhere the growth in ad revenue as the internet. Worldwide ad spending on magazines grew 2.7 percent in 2007, and that pace is forecast to pick up to 3.4 percent a year through 2010.”

  • Newsweek is “Catching Up With ‘Obama Girl’”

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    RADIO

  • All Forgiven, WIMUS-AM Is on a Roll

  • A release announced, “XM Satellite Radio and SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT today announced that they have resolved the lawsuit brought by SONY BMG against XM over its Pioneer Inno, a portable satellite radio with advanced recording features. The companies did not disclose terms of the deal.”

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    BOOKS

  • Boston Globe reports, “Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Co. is laying off employees in Boston and other offices as it consolidates some of its operations in the wake of its $4 billion acquisition of Harcourt Education, Harcourt Trade, and Greenwood-Heinemann from Reed Elsevier.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes,Craig Silverman’s devotion to the correction as a literary form dates to 2004, when the Montreal-based writer launched his Web site Regret the Error, which traps and displays journalism’s best (and funniest) corrections, retractions, apologies, and clarifications. Silverman’s essential site spawned an equally essential book last fall titled Regret the Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech, which tells you everything you need to know about the history of journalistic fallibility and the culture of corrections.”

  • The New York Times reports, “A federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to a reporter of The New York Times, apparently to try to force him to reveal his confidential sources for a 2006 book on the Central Intelligence Agency, one of the reporter’s lawyers said Thursday. The subpoena was delivered last week to the New York law firm that is representing the reporter, James Risen, and ordered him to appear before a grand jury in Alexandria, Va., on Feb. 7.”

  • A Friday release from the ACLU announced, “After reports that a federal grand jury issued a subpoena to New York Times reporter James Risen last week in an attempt to force disclosure of a confidential source, the American Civil Liberties Union today strongly objected to the subpoena, saying that basic First Amendment principles are at stake when reporters are called into the courtroom against their will. According to reports, a chapter in Mr. Risen’s book on the Central Intelligence Agency, ‘State of War,’ piqued the interest of the Justice Department and consequently he has been ordered to appear before the grand jury next week.”

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    JOBS

  • Children’s National Medical Center is looking for a PR and Marketing Specialist.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • Virilion, Inc. is looking for an Account Director.

  • The Gazette is looking for a sports reporter.

  • JBS International, Inc. is looking for Writer/Editors.

  • The Baltimore Examiner is offering Photo and Writing Internships.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Reporter, Budget & Appropriations and a Managing Editor, CongressDaily PM.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a News Editor, CQ Today.

  • USATODAY.com is looking for an Ambitious Digital Designer, a Design Developer and a Digital Storyteller.

  • The Martinsville Bulletin is looking for a News Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.30.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s Dick Cheney’s birthday!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • REVOLVING DOOR

  • Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “Who says the glory days of daring, swashbuckling Washington Post reporting have passed them by?
    In the past, we’ve seen the Post bravely cover frontline stories ranging from Afghanistan to Bosnia to members of the Axis of Evil. Today they keep that proud tradition alive. Today we see the Post boldly set foot in a … strip club.”

  • Two Groups of Editors Pen Strong Complaints About New AP Fees, Other Practices

  • A reader asks, “Did politico wait to publish so they could get SOTU coverage in the paper? I dont think RC or Hill did.”

  • The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s Campaign Coverage Index shows, “Former President Bill Clinton received more press attention in last week’s election coverage than any Republican candidate for the White House and Democrat John Edwards. Barack Obama, with his big South Carolina primary win, was the media exposure winner, registering as a significant or dominant newsmaker in 41% of the campaign stories.”

  • The Newseum and the National Archives present “Back Rooms to Ballot Boxes: Primary Reform, the People and the Press” Thursday night at 7p.m. at the William G. McGowan Theater, The National Archives, 7th & 9th Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C.
    Top of post

    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the most-watched evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54 for the week of January 21-25. Averaging 9.81 million Total Viewers and a 2.5/9 among Adults 25-54, the ABC News broadcast outperformed NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 170,000 Total Viewers and 190,000 key demo viewers. This marks ‘World News’ best performance in both categories in nearly a year (week of February 12, 2007).”

  • A CNN release announced, “CNN Productions plans to produce a series of one-hour documentaries in 2008 under its successful Broken Government brand. As it did in the 2006 midterm election, the series seeks to offer clarity to the political topics receiving close attention during the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign. The first documentary in the series, Broken Government: Health Care Critical Condition, is reported by CNN’s chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta. Critical Condition will premiere on Thursday, Jan. 31, at 11 p.m., immediately following the CNN/Los Angeles Times/POLITICO Democratic Presidential Candidates Debate and will replay on Saturday, Feb. 2, and Sunday, Feb. 3, at 11 p.m. All times Eastern.”

  • Boomberg reports, “Clear Channel Communications Inc. fell the most in more than five years in New York trading on concern the $19.5 billion buyout by private equity firms may not happen. Clear Channel dropped $2.38, or 7 percent, to $31.42 at 4:01 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading, the most since October 2002. The stock is 20 percent below the buyers’ $39.20-a-share offer.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Fox News is in for a very rough 2008″

  • The Associated Press reports, “Veteran CBS Washington hand Bob Schieffer, who has anchored ‘Face the Nation’ since 1991, said Tuesday he plans to step down from the Sunday morning political talk show with the inauguration of a new president.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Thanks to the highest rated primary debate in cable news history and strong ratings for primary coverage, CNN won the A18-49 demo in prime time for the month of January. It’s the first time in more than six years (Nov. 2001) that CNN has won the A18-49 demo (which industry observers acknowledge is not the demo preferred by advertisers).”

  • A Nielsen release announced, “On Monday, January 28, 2008, President George W. Bush’s State of the Union Address was carried live on 9 national television networks — ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, FOX News Channel, MSNBC, Telemundo, and Univision.” According to Nielsen, 27,702,000 homes watched the SOTU.

  • “Fox News Channel called the victory in the Florida GOP primary for Sen. John McCain shortly after 9:12pmET. Seconds later, CNN called the race the same way. MSNBC did not call the race until 9:17pmET, ironically just as Keith Olbermann was interviewing MSNBC Political Director Chuck Todd on the subject of why MSNBC had not called it for McCain,” reports TVNewser. Also, “As the final polls closed in Florida at 8pmET, all three networks called the fairly inconsequential Democratic primary for Sen. Hillary Clinton.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Although CNN and Fox News have alluded to the possibility, MSNBC is the only network to report that Rudy Giuliani will endorse Sen. John McCain tomorrow in California.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Hollywood’s striking writers and major studios have moved closer to bridging their divide after a week of talks, raising hopes that a new contract is within reach. The parties have narrowed the gap between them in some key areas, including how much writers should earn when films and TV shows are distributed online, according to people close to the situation who insisted on anonymity because talks are confidential.”

  • The New York Post reports, Mike Wallace under went triple-bypass heart surgery over the weekend. Wallace, 89, took his first steps yesterday, just two days after undergoing the procedure in Manhattan, reportedly at Lenox Hill Hospital. ‘Mike is recovering nicely,” a CBS News spokesman said yesterday. He quoted Wallace’s doctors as describing the surgery as ‘a great success.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Insiders tell TVNewser the Hillary Clinton campaign was prepared to give exclusive access for the next 48 hours to ABC’s 20/20, but because of a scheduling conflict, ABC News passed on the offer. Sources tell us the campaign had wanted ABC to accompany Sen. Clinton for a 48 hour period beginning today, with the report airing Friday night on 20/20.”

  • “This month marked the sixth consecutive year that FNC led the cable networks in total viewership, in total day and prime time. It also was a milestone month for FNC, which secured 14 out of the top 16 programs in cable news in total viewers and eight of the top 11 programs in the A25-54 demo (live only data),” reports TVNewser.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Check out Media Matters’ You Tube video on “America’s Mayor”

  • CNet News.com reports, “Googlers: Old media’s not dead, it just has to be Google-ized”

  • WWD asks, “What was Bill Clinton doing in the lobby of 4 Times Square Monday afternoon? The former president was spotted at the headquarters of Condé Nast Publications with a team of Secret Service agents and a photographer wearing a badge that identified him as being with the Clinton camp. Clinton’s appearance created some buzz throughout the halls, considering his wife and presidential candidate Sen. Hillary Clinton ruffled the feathers of Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour after backing out of a photo shoot for the magazine. Could he have been trying to smooth things over with Wintour, or just attempting to garner votes for his wife in New York’s primary on Feb. 5?”

  • Check out JuicyCampus.com. It announed yesterday “the addition of 50 of the nation’s leading college campuses to their network, bringing students across the country the most scandalous, salacious and entertaining stories around campus.”

  • Wired reports, “Huckabee Endorses Fire-And-Brimstone YouTube Competitor ‘GodTube’”

  • CNet News.com reports, “Clinton, Huckabee confirmed for final MySpace-MTV election ‘dialogue’”

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    MAGAZINES

  • MinOnline reports, “Publicly traded Investcorp has acquired Randall-Reilly Publishing Co., a major B2B publisher of trucking and construction magazines, from Wachovia Capital Partners in conjunction with RR prez and CEO Mike Reilly and other top managers. Aside from rollover equity participation by company management, financial terms were not disclosed. Berkery Noyes represented RR in the transaction.”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Soup Cans has a round-up of “Blogging The White House News Anchor Dinner From The Inside”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The Knight Center for Specialized Journalism is seeking a Digital Guru for Knight Center for Specialized Journalism.

  • The Gazette is looking for a Staff Writer and a Copy Design Editor.

  • Blackboard Inc. is looking for a Proposal Writer.

  • Danville Register & Bee is seeking creative designers.

  • The Roanoke Times is looking for an Editorial Writer.

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for a Ad Layout Coordinator.

  • Loudoun Times Mirror is looking for a Sports Reporter.

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • Home Front Communications is looking for a Media Specialist.

  • TeamPeople is looking for a Media Recruitment Coordinator.

  • PCAOB — Public Company Accounting Oversight Board is looking for a Associate Director, Public Affairs.

  • American Chemical Society is looking for a Senior Web Associate.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a PR/Marketing Summer Intern.

  • Potomac News Bill is seeking a Circulation Director.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.29.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you did plan on watching the SOTU last night.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Joe Peyronnin has joined Gibraltar Associates as Senior Advisor for Global Communications and New Media. Based in New York City, Mr. Peyronnin brings over 35 years of broadcast news experience to Gibraltar, including as head of news for Telemundo/NBC and Fox News, and as the number two executive at CBS News from 1989 to 1995. He is also the former Washington bureau chief for CBS News and an award winning news producer. Most recently he has worked as a full time corporate advisor to VFinity, creators of innovative digital content management software.”

  • Jossip reports, “Reuters media reporter Robert MacMillan is leaving the wire service for what we’re assuming is a bigger payday at Rupert Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal.”

  • John Fialka is joining the E&E staff on Feb. 6. “He will be leading development of — and then managing — our planned climate publication. John is a superior reporter who has led the Wall Street Journal’s environmental coverage for many years.”

  • CQ announced that Jon Weinstein “has been promoted to senior marketing manager. In this new role, Jon will oversee the circulation marketing team”

  • A release announced, “A Stanford graduate student has been chosen as the 2008 Daniel Pearl Memorial Journalism Intern. Jennifer Martinez is working toward a master’s degree in communication, specializing in journalism, after earning a bachelor’s degree with honors in international relations at Stanford in 2007. She will work in the London bureau of the Wall Street Journal this summer.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The AP reports, “U.S. newspapers’ online audiences grew about 6 percent last year, an industry group reported Thursday, a rare bit of good news for an industry struggling to adapt as readers and advertising dollars continue to migrate online.”

  • The WSJ may get a sports section?!?

  • Is journalist burnout on the rise?”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Harbinger Capital Partners plans to nominate directors for New York Times Co. and Media General Inc., both family-controlled newspaper companies. Harbinger will try to place four directors on the board of New York Times and three on Media General’s, according to statements and regulatory filings yesterday.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Metro International has announced 27 redundancies at its free newspapers in the US. It has been reported that Metro was planning to put the titles up for sales. But Metro announced today it was embarking on a restructuring plan to move the titles into profit — in agreement with joint venture partner The New York Times Company.”

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    TV

  • The New York Post reports, “The $27 billion leveraged buyout of radio giant Clear Channel Communications appears to be on solid footing despite scores of jittery investors who feared the deal could fall apart.”

  • The AP reports, “Comcast Corp., the nation’s largest cable operator, said Friday it is pulling the plug on AZN Television, its Asian American channel.”

  • TVNewser reports, “All three cable networks are taking the announcement of Sen. Edward Kennedy’s endorsement of Sen. Barack Obama.” How packed was the rally? Metroblogging DC tell us just how big.

  • The Washington Post reports, “More than 4,000 of the office building’s incandescent light bulbs were changed to fluorescent. Three large water tanks were installed in an underground parking garage to collect rainwater to irrigate a one-acre patch of lawn. Workers held contests to see who could save the most energy by turning off computers and lights. Those efforts were part of a year-long initiative at Discovery Communications’ headquarters in downtown Silver Spring to save energy, and reduce water usage and pollution. Last month, the nonprofit U.S. Green Building Council recognized Discovery’s efforts by certifying its 540,000-square-foot building as “platinum,” the highest designation under the council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program.”

  • The Tampa Tribune reports, “If you’ve been watching Fox News Channel’s election coverage of the primary season, you have seen the beginning of a new era in televised live shots. The live streaming image of chief political correspondent Carl Cameron as he cruises along the nation’s highways in a colorful Ford Expedition may look a little primitive, but it is revolutionary. ‘This is going to change the way breaking news is covered in the future,’ says Brian Wilson, Fox’s Washington bureau chief. After tinkering with various new technologies and video equipment, he says the network has converted a couple of sport utility vehicles into roaming live news centers.”

  • National Journal reports, “Psst! ‘They just spin you up on this and you happily go along,’ fumed Bill Clinton as he glared at CNN reporter Jessica Yellin. She had asked him to respond to Barack Obama and former South Carolina Democratic Party Chairman Dick Harpootlian, who likened the former president to the late bare-knuckle GOP operative Lee Atwater and charged that his wife’s campaign was engaging in ‘the politics of deception.’ Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaigner-in-chief accused Yellin and other reporters of stoking the controversy. ‘This is what you live for,’ Clinton huffed. Not always. Back in 1994, Yellin worked for Bill Clinton in the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Chris Cillizza will be a co-moderator for MySpace, MTV and the Associated Press’ ‘Closing Arguments: A Presidential Super Dialogue’ with Hillary Clinton, Mike Huckabee and other presidential frontrunners that will be presented on-air, online, and on mobile phones, Saturday, February 2, 2008 at 6:00 pm ET.”

  • Check out Tammy Haddad’s video with Hayden Panettiere on Newsweek.com

  • Instapundit points to “an unfortunate turn of phrase at Time Magazine”

  • Bloomberg reports,Peter Thiel, the first outside investor in closely held Facebook Inc., said Sarbanes-Oxley rules make it difficult for technology companies in the U.S. to go public.”

  • Check out The Baltimore Sun’s new military blog.

  • The Local Onliner reports, “Former AOL President and MTV founder Bob Pittman has lately focused on investments as head of the Pilot Group (he is a pilot). In an interview with broadband consultant Will Richmond’s VideoNuze on the eve of the NATPE show in Las Vegas, Pittman says he is bullish on small market TV stations — and their online prospects.”

  • Check out the Facebook Group, “Make Top Reporters Stop Ignoring the Top Issue”

  • The AP reports, Nigel Eccles, a news junkie and former online betting site employee, wanted to try pursuing both interests at once. Thus was born Hubdub — a new Web site Eccles and three colleagues in Edinburgh, Scotland, assembled — where customers will bet for fun, not money, on the outcomes of real news stories.”

  • News and Tech.com reports, “The 13th annual Digital Awards, to be handed out later this month at the Newspaper Association of America’s Marketing Conference, reflects the breadth and depth of video now available on newspaper Web sites.”

  • On Media reports, “Media, tech and Internet companies, and the Wall Street analysts who cover them, are looking beyond the current tumult to the rest of this year and into 2009. Unfortunately, many don’t like what they see.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Gannett Co. (GCI) acquired Banquet, which operates an action sports Web site and advertisement network. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed.”

  • The Independent reports, “What has been the greatest shock so far in the American election? Barack Obama’s meteoric Iowan rise? Hillary Clinton’s tearful comeback in New Hampshire? John McCain’s resurrection in South Carolina? No. The biggest surprise thus far has been the relative insignificance of the internet in determining the outcome of the election.”

  • A release announced, “For its first recent foray into longer-format video, Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. has won a 2007 Aegis Award for ‘Who Cares? Kiplinger’s No-Nonsense Look at Long-Term Care.’ The 22-minute educational video offers an informative, consumer-friendly review of long-term care—explaining what it is, what it costs, and how to pay for it.”

  • A release announced, “The U.S. Chamber of Commerce today announced the launch of its blog, ChamberPost. The Chamber’s blog provides a real time public platform for issues of importance to the business community.”

  • Reuters reports, “Google-DoubleClick deal likely to win EU go-ahead”

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    MAGAZINES

  • PR Week reports, “A new survey suggests that trust in business is higher than trust in government in the US and other countries. The results of the ninth annual Edelman Trust Barometer show that the trust gap was greatest in the US, where 58% of respondents said they trust business to do the right thing versus 39% for government.”

  • Fortune’s David Kirkpatrick reports, “European companies like Germany’s Burda are driving toward a software-powered future of blended professional and amateur content.”

  • The New York Times reports,Evan G. Galbraith Jr., a former ambassador to France and a Republican contender for governor of New York in 1994, died Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 79. The cause was cancer, said his wife, the former Marie Rockwell. For 15 years before accepting the ambassadorship in 1981, Mr. Galbraith, who was also an international banker, had been chairman of National Review”

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    RADIO

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

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    JOBS

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for an Advertising Copywriter.

  • Washington Examiner is looking for freelance Real Estate Reporters.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.22.08

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    Good morning Washington. Eleven years ago today, the Senate confirmed Madeleine Albright as secretary of state. And it’s Diane Lane’s birthday! (Hat Tip: MicCheckRadio).

    See more after the jump.

    Read more

    Morning Reading List, 12.21.07

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    Good morning Washington. You don’t plan on watching any college football games on New Years Day. And, this morning, Kiefer Sutherland celebrates his 41st birthday sober, and in jail.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The Washington Post put together a quick audio slideshow that deconstructs Barack Obama’s fashion choices. Surfacely it seems that Obama is almost always wearing the same dark suit, and often without a tie. Robin Givhan and Nancy Donaldson look closer to see what these vestments signify. According to them, it shows that Obama is a modern leader, echoing the relaxed but still professional mindset of the American workforce.”

  • John Boehner is a fashion cop for reporters.

  • Bloomberg reports, “The chief executives of Gannett Co. and Media General Inc. personally lobbied top U.S. regulators before winning exceptions to rules that limit newspaper and broadcast ownership in the same markets.”

  • New York Times’ David Pogue explores, “The Generational Divide in Copyright Morality”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “A new era at Tribune Co. began taking shape Wednesday with the departure of Chairman and Chief Executive Dennis FitzSimons and the expected arrival of new leadership under Chicago billionaire Sam Zell. The changing of the guard represents a make-or-break proposition for the 160-year-old media concern, struggling to transform itself for the Internet age by going private in a daring, debt-laden $8.2 billion deal.”

  • We hear the Washington Times tree is back up. The first one had its needles fall off.

  • Washington City Paper reports, “To this day, the Washington Post lives by the guiding principles of fabled publisher Eugene Meyer, who decreed, among other things, the following: ‘As a disseminator of news, the paper shall observe the decencies that are obligatory upon a private gentleman.’ And these days that means not publishing the word ‘dick’ in the Style section.”

  • DCist reports, “Metro fares aren’t the only thing going up in price in D.C. If you’re in the habit of purchasing a copy of the Washington Post from a vending machine or a sidewalk hawker on your way to work in the morning, take note: the cost of the daily paper is about to go up by 15 cents. The Post’s newsstand price will become 50 cents beginning on Dec. 31. The company cited a decline in the paper’s circulation and advertising revenue as the reason for the increase.”

  • The AP reports, “The National Press Foundation will honor half a dozen journalists at its 25th anniversary dinner in February.”

  • The New York Times reports,Claudia Payne, special sections editor, is answering reader questions Dec. 18-21. Questions may be e-mailed to askthetimes@nytimes.com.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Editors at the Associated Press have picked the year’s top 10 stories, and we expected the presidential campaign to be like, you know, top five or something, right? Well, it lands in at #8 — coincidentally one spot ahead of the immigration debate.”

  • Drudge reports, “McCain Pleads with NY Times to Spike Story”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper publisher McClatchy Co. said Thursday revenue fell 9.2 percent in November, primarily from a sharp drop in classified ads as jobs and real estate listings continue to migrate online.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, December 16, 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ posted 3.12 million total viewers, the program’s best total viewer delivery since the week of February 4, 2007. In addition, ‘This Week’ increased the most of the Sunday discussion programs among Total Viewers compared to last year, a significant 28%.”

  • Also from ABC: “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of December 10, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ beat CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Adults 25-54 for the third week in a row. The last time ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ three weeks in a row in the demo was May 1995.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 16, 2007. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.205 million total viewers.”

  • “CNN and NBC/MSNBC have released their coverage plans for the Iowa Caucus, Thursday Jan. 3.” Check out the full details at TVNewser.

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN will air a Special **LIVE** ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE, Sunday, December 23rd at Noon (ET), and will re-air in the normal Road to the White House timeslots of 6:30 & 9:30 pm”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News Sunday Morning continues as the #1 Sunday morning news program, and it’s growing. Last Sunday the Charles Osgood program drew 5.34M Total Viewers, up 12% year-to-year.”

  • An ABC insider tells us, “Hilarity has ensued at our bureau after a widely attended ‘facebook seminar’ earlier this month. It’s now commonplace to see highly regarded producers and correspondents asking interns about ‘poking’.”

  • USAToday reports, “If you plan to dance at your New Year’s Eve party, you might want to pick up some moves from White House correspondent David Gregory, who boogied this morning to Mary J. Blige music.” Check out the video here.

  • One year after her departure, Kathleen Matthews’ picture has finally been removed from the banner welcoming visitors to WJLA in Rosslyn.

  • Forbes reports, “Despite a growing cadre of viewing alternatives like the Web and repeat-heavy schedules on the broadcast networks, people are still watching television, a new survey finds.”

  • B&C reports, “Hearst-Argyle is taking participatory democracy into the newsroom. The broadcaster is asking viewers and Web surfers to submit videos about the upcoming New Hampshire primary to the station Web sites of its WMUR-TV Manchester, N.H., and WCVB-TV Boston as well as the stations’ YouTube channels.”

  • Check out the latest installment from Green Room Girl.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Beet TV reported yesterday, “Earlier today I interviewed Cynthia Farrar, the CEO and producer of PurpleStates.TV. Tomorrow, the first of nearly a dozen video segments produced by her new company and reported by non-professional citizen journalists, go up on the Op-Ed pages of the NYTimes.com The videos will be uploaded through February 5, ‘Super Tuesday.’”

  • PolitiFact is a finalist in the prestigious DigitalEdge awards by the Newspaper Association of America for best overall news site along with the Star-Tribune of Minneapolis and washingtonpost.com. You can find out more here.

  • WebProNews reports, “Bloggers from the left, center, and right sides of the political spectrum opened a group blog on Newsweek.com called The Ruckus.”

  • The LCV just launched a new website “calling the Sunday talk show hosts to task for ignoring the issue of global warming.” Check it out here.

  • Hotline’s On Call announced, “check in often between Christmas and New Year’s for On Call’s up-to-date coverage of the presidential contest.”

  • The AP reports, “Antitrust regulators approved Google Inc.’s $3.1 billion purchase of DoubleClick Inc., clearing the way for a formidable combination in the burgeoning online advertising sector. Microsoft Corp. and AT&T Inc. have lobbied heavily against the deal, but the Federal Trade Commission gave it the go-ahead Thursday.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • In the first edition of The Atlantic’s politics roundtable, Marc Ambinder, Ross Douthat, and Matthew Yglesias predict which candidates will win the primaries and debate whether Hillary’s slide is a media fabrication. Check it out here.

  • A reader points out “a notable first for DC: NYMag.com suggests that the DC food scene has something that New York doesn’t. ha.”

  • Starting this week, much of CQ content is now accessible and easy to read on your handheld device. “The new handheld-optimized pages include news stories from CQ Weekly and CQ Today, CQ Transcripts, CQ BillAnalysis and many other services.”

  • Popular Mechanics has published its first ever Geek the Vote — an online guide to all the candidates’ stances on issues related to science and technology including energy policy and climate change, gun control, science education and infrastructure investment. Check it out here.

  • The New Republic reports,Max Brantley, the editor of the alternative weekly Arkansas Times, has feuded with Mike Huckabee since the presidential candidate first appeared on the political stage during his failed 1992 Senate run. A liberal columnist married to a circuit judge appointed by Bill Clinton, Brantley penned weekly columns antagonizing Huckabee for his staunchly conservative social views, opaque campaign finance disclosures, and acceptance of gifts during his time in office. ‘Huckabee would believe I covered him obsessively, and he’d be right about that,’ Brantley says.”

  • The New Republic’s Sean Wilentz writes, “Opinion-slingers are mooning over Barack Obama’s instincts. Don’t they remember how badly that worked out last time?”

  • The Atlantic’s Megan McArdle writes, “the wild, drunken office Christmas party used to be a staple of television, books, and movies. Now I feel as if it’s dropped pretty thoroughly out of the popular imagination; the only example I can think of recently is a fleeting scene in Bridget Jones’ Diary. Were office holiday parties really that much wilder in the past? Or have we just stopped noticing, literarily?”

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    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News and South Carolina ETV Radio (the state’s public radio network) will present an audio-only Republican Presidential Debate, to be broadcast on NPR Member stations and webcast live from 2:00-4:00PM (EST) on Wednesday, January 16. NPR News journalists and hosts Steve Inskeep, Michele Norris and Robert Siegel will act as moderators.”

  • So far, there has been over 3000 comments in response to Bryant Park Project blog post asking Ron Paul supporters to identify themselves.

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Potomac Flacks reports, “Preparing your boss for a MTP appearance isn’t an easy assignment (especially when it’s the full hour)! Many a guest has recruited high-priced talent to do their best Russert in hopes of better preparing for the grilling they will receive on Sunday. Word on the street was that former Bush Administration flack, Adam Levine did the best Russert impersonation in town. Looks as though he has some serious competition after Romney’s appearance last Sunday.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Steve Valentini, the circulation director for Politico, is jumping ship and going over to the Examiner.

  • On Jan. 2, Quin Hillyer is leaving Citizens United to begin work at the editorial page of the Washington Examiner as Associate Editor.

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    JOBS

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Director of Business Development, an Editor for Morning Rundown and an Editor for the
    Afternoon Rundown
    .

  • The Daily Progress is looking for an Assistant City Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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