TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Bill Shine’

Was Rivera Muzzled? A Tale of the Tape

One man’s cut is another man’s dip is another man’s “Sorry, I’m not hearing anything.”

On Monday NYT‘s Brian Stelter reported on a bit from an upcoming book by Bloomberg View‘s Jonathan Alter. The part in question alleges that just days before the 2012 presidential election, nearly two months after terrorist attacks on a U.S. consulate in Libya, FNC CEO Roger Ailes personally called one of his channel’s producers and ordered that Geraldo Rivera‘s mic be cut.

In the segment in which Rivera appeared, he criticized his colleague Eric Bolling for what he said was politicizing the attack. As the segment droned on for seven minutes, Ailes ordered the muzzling of Rivera, according to Alter’s book.

Stelter wrote that he sought comment from FNC, which never returned his request (not unusual for the channel’s illustriously choosy PR department). Instead, a spokesperson for FNC went to Mediaite and gave them their side: It was that FNC Executive Vice President of Programming Bill Shine, who called up the producer and ordered not Rivera’s mic be cut, but that the show’s hosts move on to another, less emotionally-charged subject. (The next segment was on immigration, not at all an polarizing topic).

Rivera denied Alter’s account in a tweet. Alter replied, asking why Rivera’s “office” didn’t deny the claim when he called to ask about it. “Specifically to Jonathan Alter, I like you mate,” Rivera countered, “but you never spoke with me about Benghazi and you never asked if Roger Ailes cut my mic.”

Mediaite‘s Andrew Kirell posted the full video from the segment in question, noting that “At no point during the segment is Rivera inaudible.”

Oliver Willis over at the anti-FNC Media Matters disagreed. He also posted the full video, claiming to hear “a change in Rivera’s microphone volume.”

What you can take away from watching and listening to either clip… Read more

Mediabistro Course

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot CampDevelop a plan for your book's success in our brand new online boot camp, Book Promotion & Publicity! Starting July 10, publishing and public relations experts will teach you the publicity skills needed to ensure a successful book launch, such as, how to create a social media kit, interact with fans and authors on panels, create a marketing newsletter and more! Register now! 
 

Operation ‘Butter Up FNC’ in Full Force by Politico

Politico has been working diligently to defrost its icy relationship with Fox News as of late. And it appears to be paying off, or at least moving in a cozier direction.

FishbowlDC has learned that FNC’s media relations department has been forced to “soften up” on Politico. “From the top it has come down that media relations have to be softer than they are,” a source who requested strict anonymity told FBDC. While Politico reporters may not start popping up on FNC programs by, say, next Tuesday, it is headed that way. “There are certain shows that would like to have them on and I think that will happen,” our source said.

But let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves. The two media entities are still in mid-thaw. Fox News and Politico have notoriously not gotten along, with a string of media writers placed on the infamous Black List (which exists no matter what they claim and, in fact, is discussed monthly). Just three months ago FNC PR snubbed Politico reporters, saying they “tend not to rate well” on the network. Politico responded with a sticky-sweet profile on “Special Report” anchor Bret Baier. Fast forward two months to today and Politico has a three-page story on “how Fox News has stayed on top” of cable ratings for a decade. Both stories are by Mike Allen.

We wrote Allen as well as Politico‘s editor-in-chief John Harris to ask if they’ve seen any uptick in FNC booking their writers. To Harris: “Are there any talks between Fox News and Politico to get more airtime for your reporters in the way MSNBC has?” To Allen: “In the past Fox hasn’t booked too many Politico reporters. Has that changed of late? Have you been booked on Fox before?” We also reached out to some of the talent at FNC to get their take on the matter. So far, no word.

Allen’s buttery piece quotes FNC execs as well as talent…

Read more

Things You Might Have Missed…

Daredevil dog, courtesy of Foreign Policy

Terrorism has gone to the dogs: ForeignPolicy.com Deputy Managing Editor Rebecca Frankel‘s photo essay about the kick-ass canines known as “war dogs”  went viral yesterday when it was discovered that one of the subjects of her ongoing feature helped take down Osama bin Laden. Fun Fact:  Did you know that in early 2010, the U.S. Army had over 2,800 active-duty dogs deployed?  Don’t miss FP’s amazing stories and photo gallery dedicated to these patriotic pooches.

Happy Hour: Christine Delargy finally proved her theory that ‘weeknight boozing’ and ‘winning the day’ are directly related.  While partaking in an after-work libation at Morton’s last night, the CBSer spotted one John Boehner smoking a few cigs and enjoying a bottle of red wine.  The result of the random encounter was today’s scoop that the Speaker of the House chose not to watch the first GOP presidential debate.

Huckabee Hoopla: On May 5th, RCP’s Erin McPike reported that Fox News brass gave former Governor Mike Huckabee, a contributor to the network,  until the end of the month to decide whether he will retain his contract or make a run for the presidency.  In response to the story, Fox News VP Bill Shine issued a statement saying, “There’s no truth whatsoever to this report.”  Today, RCP’s Carl Cannon fired back in defense of McPike.

Morning Reading List 06.22.09

Good morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Happy (belated) Father’s Day, particularly to John Harwood, who received a fitting gift from MSNBC co-anchor Norah O’Donnell on-air Friday. Check out how CNN’s John King commemorated Father’s Day on “State of the Union” here. Also, we find this a little unfair, but HuffPost has a poll up, “Will the kids outshine their famous media dads?” DC’s Luke Russert ranks second out of nine most likely to.

Happy Birthday to Mike Allen, who officially celebrated 45 this weekend. And also to Brit Hume (h/t Playbook). What we know and what we’re reading this Monday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

NYT: Over the past year, the Boston Globe‘s union pursued a strategy of “frustration and delay,” while the company publicly said little about The Globe. As a result, employees were in the dark about the seriousness of the paper’s financial situation and the management proposals.

TV

Fox’s Shepard Smith is profiled in Sunday’s NYT, “a study in contrast.” “While Mr. Smith does not draw the same attention as other evening anchors on the channel, his 7 p.m. show, “The Fox Report,” is having its best year, up 36 percent to almost two million viewers a night. He has beaten his cable news channel competition for 92 straight months. His coverage of the museum killing beat CNN and MSNBC combined. So why do some Fox viewers believe he does not belong? Maybe because Mr. Smith has established a record that seems antithetical to the image Fox has earned as a purveyor of conservative orthodoxy. He is the “voice of the opposition on some issues,” according to Bill Shine, Fox’s senior vice president for programming.”

Bobbie Battista, formerly of CNN, is now in on the jokes at the Onion News Network- also part of the entertainment at Friday night’s RTCA dinner.

Anderson Cooper, Tom Brokaw, and Ted Turner all make the wowOwow list of “Sexy Gray-Haired Men From Politics, Business and Hollywood”.

ONLINE

Google is experimenting with adding Wikipedia to news search results.

WaPo’s Howard Kurtz takes a visit to Gawker’s headquarters in NY for this week’s Media Notes.

NEWS NOTES

NYT: David Rohde, a New York Times reporter who was kidnapped by the Taliban, escaped Friday night and made his way to freedom after more than seven months of captivity in the mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan. More on how he escaped from NYT here.

Related- E&P: At least 40 news organizations observed a news blackout about the situation. And CSM: Should the media have kept quiet?

TVNewser has an update on Walter Cronkite‘s health here.

WEST WING REPORTAGE

Bloomberg’s Al Hunt penned this piece for Sunday’s NYT, “Letter from Washington: On Message and on Everywhere.” “There will be no real Mr. Obama confidants in the press corps – no Ben Bradlee as in the Kennedy administration or Lou Cannon in the Reagan years – who have an authoritative, inside pipeline or are the president’s Boswells-in-waiting… To be sure, some of his aides are less measured. Rahm Emanuel, Mr. Obama’s chief of staff, actively courts journalists, even going with some of his favorites to a recent Bruce Springsteen concert. No one works the press more diligently than the special Afghanistan-Pakistan representative, Richard C. Holbrooke. The Obama team simultaneously courts and criticizes the media. It’s forever working the referees, complaining about stories, sometimes with no justification, in the hope of getting a better call next time.”

HAT TIPS: mediabistro, Politico

JOBS after the jump…

Read more

Baier Doesn’t Mind If His Viewers Don’t Always Agree With Him

Do people prefer to watch shows that reinforce their opinions or that challenge them?

Fox News’ senior vice president of programming Bill Shine talks about the loyalty of his network’s viewers with the Houston Chronicle. And he says yes, that comfort does attribute to their ratings success.

But his boy in DC, Bret Baier, host of Special Report, disagrees.

From the Chronicle: “A certain type of viewer with one kind of ideological spin wanting to watch one type of show because that is what they like to hear… I don’t see it,” Baier said. “There are days we cover every kind of story. And so, on any given day, you will see something on our show you won’t agree with, depending on your point of view.”

Fox Thrives in the Age of Obama

TVNewser: NPR’s David Folkenflik reports (and has the comments section at NPR.org buzzing) how Fox News has been getting “crazy high” ratings for a news channel since President Barack Obama took office. “There were a couple of people who basically wrote about our demise come last November [and] December and were, I guess, rooting for us to go away,” says FNC SVP Bill Shine.

Victor Navasky, publisher emeritus of the left-of-center magazine The Nation, isn’t surprised. “It’s a rallying point for people who feel that they’re not represented at the highest levels of power,” he says.

Says Folkenflik: “If some of Fox’s most famous figures feel as though they’re on the outside looking in, there are a lot of viewers keeping them company.”

Morning Reading List, 07.11.08

july4 047.JPG

Good Morning Washington. I really doubt you’re going to guess what local trail the above picture was taken on, but knock yourselves out.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 10.24.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think global warming is no big deal.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-fourth time in twenty-six weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/9 and 2.58 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 70,000 for the week. This marks ABC’s best demo performance in five months (w/o 5/14/07). Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ posted its highest delivery in nearly six months (w/o 4/23/07), averaging 8.1 million to NBC’s 8.2 million. The ABC broadcast also placed first among Households (5.7/12), tying NBC for the week.”

  • Matthew Felling on “The Drudge Effect.”
  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of October 15-19, 2007. The NBC broadcast has now won for two straight weeks and for three of the last four weeks.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “In an era when commercial radio seems to be floundering, National Public Radio is hitting its stride. Some 25.5 million people tune into its programming each week, up from 13 million a decade ago. It has more than 800 member stations, up from 635 a decade ago. … Much of this growth has occurred under Ken Stern, NPR’s chief executive, who joined as executive vice president in 1999.”

  • Is The Washington Post into wife swapping? His Extreme-ness explains.

  • Tell Media Matters what you think. Take their survey here.

  • Baltimore Business Journal reports, “Senior citizens living in Europe and the Middle East will soon be able to watch shows produced for elderly audiences by Retirement Living TV, thanks to two new international deals expected to be unveiled this week. The television network, owned and operated by Catonsville-based Erickson Retirement Communities, signed it’s first international programming deal Monday with Anarey Communication’s Health Channel in Israel to air three of its feature shows. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.”

  • Commonwealth Times reports, “Jackie Jones, a former editor for The Washington Post, has spent her career working at more than 11 news services, but she tells VCU students not to resent small beginnings. … Jones came to VCU after she was awarded the 2007 Virginius Dabney Distinguished Professorship.”

  • USA Today offers an excerpt from Cathie Black’s Basic Black, “a thoughtful book on achieving success and balance in life. … Black, 63, oversees 19 magazines in the USA and 200 publications internationally — including Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping,Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar — as president of Hearst Magazines.”

  • “NPR to Self: Ixnay on the ‘Ixnay’

  • TVNewser reports, “If you were watching Fox News Channel this weekend then you noticed some programming changes. FNC SVP Bill Shine tells TVNewser he’s just ‘tweaking’ the schedule to see what works. Shine says being ‘in the middle of the NFL season’ is a good time to try out new anchors and new programs.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins writes, “NYT Misses True Nature of Clinton-Drudge Relationship”

  • DCRTV points us to this release, announcing “The District of Columbia’s Office of Cable Television and Telecommunications has been officially renamed the DC Office of Cable Television, as set forth in an Administrative Order signed and released by Mayor Adrian M. Fenty.”

  • Bassam Sebti writes in the Washington Post, “What I Risked as an Iraqi Journalist”

  • Inside Cable News reports, “GretaWire blogs about her first interviews with Laura Bush as she follows the First Lady around the Middle East/Africa…”

  • AdAge reports, “HuffPo Will Lose a Lot More Than Money If It Doesn’t Pay Talent”

  • PR Week talks to Paul Pendergrass, “a self-described ‘lifetime flack,’ had a career working for Coca-Cola in almost all facets of communications in the US, Europe, and South Africa before opening his own consultancy in Atlanta in 2001.”

  • As of yesterday, “NPR’s The Bryant Part Project will take a look at nuclear power through a unique multimedia series — including four days of interviews and reports on the radio show and video and interactive features and discussions online.” For the full schedule, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Another longtime publishing executive is exiting Time Inc. David Morris, who has been the publisher of Entertainment Weekly, is leaving the company after 21 years. The magazine will be swept under a new umbrella group called the Time Inc. Entertainment Group.”

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Unit have received the 2007 Online News Association Journalism Award for their reporting on the Mark Foley Congressional Page scandal on the Investigative Unit’s web page, ‘The Blotter,’ the Online News Association and the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communications announced Friday.”

  • Reuters reports, “MediaNews Group Inc said on Monday that Hearst Corp bought a stake in the company for $317 million as part of a complex deal between the two privately held publishers involving several San Francisco-area.”

  • The Houston Chronicle reports, “The Houston Chronicle is cutting about 5 percent of its work force through layoffs and the elimination of open positions as it restructures the operations of the newspaper, Publisher and President Jack Sweeney said Monday. Approximately 70 employees will be affected by the changes.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, Time Warner Inc.’s Internet unit, is introducing wireless services to entice some of its 114 million monthly U.S. online visitors to access the company’s Web sites with their mobile phones.”

  • Campaign Standard reports on “a controversy brewing inside the Beltway.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “When Beijing was appointed to host the 2008 Olympic Games, it promised that foreign media would have the same ability to report as in previous Olympics; no less, no more. … Simply delivering on China’s original promise is hard enough, I was told by an insider of one of the larger news operations, because of the way this country is organized. This person’s news organization is bringing in hundreds of reporters, and it wants to broadcast from over 100 locations in China — just as like it did for Olympics in other nations.”

  • Check out Right-Wing Facebook, launched by People for the American Way and RightWingWatch.org.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Bernstein makes first visit to Nixon Library”

  • Sacramento Bee reports, “The last lingering detail of a complicated $1 billion newspaper sale by The McClatchy Co. has been wrapped up. Hearst Corp. has paid $317 million for a stake in Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc., according to a regulatory filing.”

  • On Plame’s book, The New York Times writes, “Her Identity Revealed, Her Story Expurgated”

  • Wonkette reports, “That’s ostensible born-again Christian Tom DeLay and ostentatious, drunken God-hater Christopher Hitchens making nice with each other at the Hill’s book fair last week!”

  • TVNewser reports, “Up against baseball, football, and some desperate housewives, FNC’s GOP debate in Orlando Sunday night pulled in a respectable 2,462,000 total viewers (live + same day), and 773,000 in the A25-54 demo.”

  • Romenesko reports, “From Joseph N. DiStefano, Philadelphia Inquirer: Knight Ridder did develop a plan to consolidate copy desks into a few regional centers, according to newspaper executives I talked to when I was covering the company in 2005-2006.”

  • McClatchy reports, “American taxpayers are helping to foot the bill so foreign writers can savor California wine. Subsidized by the Agriculture Department and the wineries, the writers from Canada, Europe and Asia tour some of this country’s most renowned wine regions, and winemakers say their stories boost foreign sales. Lawmakers agree, and they want to increase funding in the new farm bill that senators will consider next week.”

  • From The New York Observer: “Analyzing Bill Keller Analyzing War and Peace”

  • The Sacramento Bee reports, “Serious philosophers make the case that Jon Stewart is the Socrates of our day”

  • B&C reports, “Presidential candidate and Illinois Democratic Sen. Barack Obama wants Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin Martin to take a series of intermediary steps before making the leap to rewrite media-ownership rules, saying that not to do so would be irresponsible.”

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times Co reported a 6.7 percent rise in profit on Tuesday because of higher national advertising sales and a price increase for its flagship newspaper, sending its shares up as much as 8 percent.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein announced today that J. William Leonard, Director of the Information Security Oversight Office, who will be retiring from the post at year’s end, has agreed to become Senior Counselor to the Archivist beginning in January 2008.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Reuters has said that it is working with Nokia on a project that could ‘transform the way journalists file news reports on the move’. It is a new mobile application which the agency said is ‘a lightweight toolkit that provides everything journalists need to file and publish stories from even the most remote regions of the world.’”

  • New York Post reports, “American Heritage will rise again. Edwin S. Grosvenor has purchased the magazine, Web site and book division from the Forbes family with plans to resume publication with a December/January issue. The deal is for $500,000 in cash and the assumption of about $10 million in subscription liabilities, putting the deal’s total value at around $11 million.”

  • “This Wednesday evening at 6:30 PM, October 24, Martin Luther King, III, CEO of Realizing The Dream Foundation and AmericanLife TV Network (www.americanlifetv.com) will be hosting a reception and screening of the documentary ‘Poverty in America’. Reporter Nick Clooney and Representatives Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bruce Braley (D-Iowa) will also be in attendance.”

  • Reuters reports, “Comcast Corp said on Monday that file transfers on peer-to-peer networks such as BitTorrent may be delayed by bandwidth management technology, but it denied blocking access to any applications or content.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., owner of the world’s most popular search engine, offered to preserve some business practices at DoubleClick Inc. in a bid to win antitrust approval for its proposed $3.1 billion purchase of the company.”

  • Wired Magazine talks to James Murdoch “on Satellite TV, His Google Deal, and What Mogul Means”

  • Washington Times praises Fox’s Chris Wallace for his job as moderator during last weekend’s debate.

  • CNN announced in a release yesterday, “For her services to journalism, Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent, today was awarded a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Queen Elizabeth II.”

  • Check out “Deborah Kanafani, Author of Unveiled and mb Instructor, on Writing Controversial Nonfiction vs. Controversial Memoir.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Wayne Metcalfe, vice president of the Genealogical Society of Utah, … announced a five-year partnership agreement to digitize case files of approved pension applications of widows of Civil War Union soldiers from the National Archives.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “As moderator of Meet the Press, Tim Russert is the one who usually asks the tough questions. That role was reversed yesterday at the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. Russert chatted with eighth graders at the independent school, touching on the 2008 presidential election, before accepting the Magis Spirit Award for his support of Gesu and other local Jesuit ministries at a ceremony in the cozy first-floor library.”

  • TVNewser reports,Rush Limbaugh Gushes Over Erin Burnett

  • “This headline’s on the Post’s politics Web page. Well, has anyone ever seen them together in the same place at the same time? There’s only one way to find the truth: Look up Rudy’s skirt,” Wonkette suggests.

  • Inside Cable News writes,Mika Brzezinski: The next Andrea Mitchell?”

  • East West Magazine reports on the Dalhi Lama’s appearance in D.C. last week. “In closing remarks, the Dalai Lama pointed to the cameras in the back of the room where dozens upon dozens of the press gathered and said that the media has the role to educate and change society without ‘preaching’ and that education is a key to provoke positive change. “India, the Indian constitution is not a rejection of religion…it respects all beliefs, all equal…this interpretation, this inclusive secular way of education is very, very important.’”

  • A release announced, “Danny Heitman is the winner of the second annual In Character Prize for editorial and opinion writing about the human virtues, presented at an October 18th ceremony at New York City’s Yale Club. The Louisiana-native won the $10,000 prize for his essay ‘Daily Thanksgiving is Worth the Work,’ originally published in the November 22, 2006 edition of the Christian Science Monitor (also the publisher of last year’s winning essay).”

  • A USAToday release announced, “USATODAY.com announces the launch of five new widgets to its site, widgets.USATODAY.com. This second round of widgets will roll out through mid-November. Originally launched on Sept. 4, 2007, USATODAY.com’s widgets provide another way for consumers to experience and share news and information online in the manner that is most convenient to them. Users can use widgets to incorporate some of the most popular features of USATODAY.com on their blog, web page or social network.”

  • “In this month’s new and improved Video Pitch Slam 1-on-1, three hopeful writers pitch Blender editor-in-chief Craig Marks on camera with stories ranging from the music scene at the South Pole to a closing time anthem. The mag’s wide open to feature stories — for specifics, see our How to Pitch: Blender article — so keep watching to see if Craig buys anyone’s story.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Reading The New York Times’ coverage of the conservative Values Voter Summit held in Washington, D.C., this past weekend, where Republican presidential contenders paraded before evangelical activists, it was clear who the Times thought was the star of the event: Rudy Giuliani.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Today’s Washington Post crossword features an unusually meta pair of consecutive clues (16-and 17-Across). We’re anxious to see if the sudoku world will respond by encoding the 1 through 9 matrix to make fun of Oral Roberts.”

  • New York Times opines, “The administration’s distaste for a federal shield bill — and its claims that it threatens national security — should be seen as just another extension of its obsession with secrecy.”
  • You may have noticed that CNN’s logo has gone from red to green in honor of Planet in Peril, which aired last night and tonight from 9-11 ET.

  • Check out The memeorandum Leaderboard which “lists the sources most frequently posted to memeorandum.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS said it didn’t take any remedial action after the Federal Communications Commission found drama Without a Trace indecent back in 2006, saying it didn’t think it had to.”

  • Blogging on The Huffington Post, Valerie Plame writes, “I just learned the other day that my scheduled Tuesday appearance on the Charlie Rose show has been canceled. The show’s producer said it was because Charlie Rose wanted to prepare for an appearance next week by CIA Director General Michael Hayden. How ironic is that? I could have told Mr. Rose a few things about General Hayden, but I’m sure he’ll do a fine job with his interview questions without me.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Countdown with Keith Olbermann won the 8pmET hour in the A25-45 demo Friday night topping The O’Reilly Factor by 25,000 viewers (live+ same day). Bill O’Reilly still had the #1 program in total viewers with 1.4M, more than doubling Olbermann’s audience. O’Reilly was anchoring, but it was a previously aired program (Oct. 9).”

    Jobs

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Legal Correspondent.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • A National Consumer Magazine is looking for a Sales Representative-D.C., Philly, Baltimore.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military is looking for a Reporter.

  • Voice of America is seeking a Senior TV Production Specialist.

  • CNSNews.com is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 08.16.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you do use supplements regularly.

  • An ABC release announced, “‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ will produce the first Democratic presidential debate of the 2008 presidential election to be aired on broadcast television. The debate will be moderated by ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos with additional questioning from David Yepsen of The Des Moines Register and will be held at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa on Sunday morning, August 19, 2007.”

  • Don’t forget that The Washington Blogger Meetup is today! You can see who’s coming and RSVP here.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC’s SVP of programming, Bill Shine announced the network ‘will not continue the Half Hour News Hour beyond its current 15 episode run.’”

  • “Channel 9′s Tracey Neale, who is headed to Africa to pick up her kids. The WUSA anchor announced the news on Tuesday’s broadcast: ‘I’ll be adopting 1-year-old twins, so I’m going to have my hands full,’ she told viewers.”

  • Why is there a Black journalism organization?”

  • A tipster writes in, “Good for Plante for shouting an intelligent question–and a valid one, and an important one, and a relevant one. Good for Plante. He was doing his job. The question was a good one.”

  • From CJR: “The WSJ editorial page launches baseless attacks on its competitors’ motives—it will fit right in at News Corp.”

  • Slate’s Christopher Beam tells us, “How to mash together the ultimate search engine”

  • Julian Friedland writes in the Denver Post, “Last week, the New York Times reduced the width of its pages by an inch and a half — joining a trend that has reduced both the space devoted to news and commentary and the staff sizes of many daily newspapers throughout the country. And, recently, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation won its fight to buy The Wall Street Journal.”

  • Denver Post reports, “At an Aspen forum, executives in media new and old say papers are staying relevant by changing their mind-set about delivery”

  • From The Hollywood Reporter: “Sirius Satellite Radio — more popular in automobiles than in living rooms — is making it easier to get Howard Stern, along with dozens of commercial-free channels, on home-based radios.”

  • Ad Week reports, “Since Facebook opened its site to developers in May, it has been flooded with mini-programs that let users throw virtual food at one another, post movie reviews and share YouTube videos. The influx of applications, now up to over 2,800, is leading to the creation of ad networks designed to let developers profit from their work and help advertisers reach Facebook’s growing user base.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The October issue of Condé Nast Portfolio is already closing and it looks like it will rack up a nice, healthy 121 ad pages for its third issue. That’s only one ad page down from the magazine’s September issue, which went on sale today with 122 ad pages – the third-best ad-page tally for a second issue in magazine publishing history, behind O, The Oprah Magazine and the late John F. Kennedy Jr.’s now-defunct George magazine, which racked up 125 ad pages in its second outing.”

  • CNN reports, “He’s a veteran statesman and hard-hitting chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. But Sen. Patrick Leahy is set to leave the marble halls of Washington for the bright lights of Hollywood — at least briefly. Vermont’s senior senator has landed a speaking role in the newest Batman movie, CNN affiliate WPTZ reports and confirmed by Leahy’s office.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. and its YouTube video- sharing site staved off the threat of legal action from Belgium’s soccer association by offering a technology that will allow the group to monitor where its matches are broadcast.”

  • Variety reports, “Viacom has pledged $1 million in cash and more than $500,000 in media value to support the construction of a memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.”

  • Fortune reports, “Readers of the The Sun, a British tabloid best known for its bare-breasted Page Three girls, opened their newspapers to see a young woman named Keeley Hazell wearing only green paint. Ms. Hazell is the face — well, not just the face — of the paper’s campaign against global warming.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Yahoo! Inc., fighting Google Inc. for local advertisers, added more city-specific Web pages with information on movies, events and neighborhood restaurants.”

  • MediaLife reports, “Since April, more than 900 newsroom jobs have been cut in these days of declining circulation and shrinking ad revenues. Now the paper cuts are extending even to those who’ve made an effort to avoid them in the past.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “This summer has been an unusual hunting season for the start-up world, with nascent Internet companies firmly in the crosshairs of major media conglomerates.”

  • Poynter Online points us to this gem from ABCnews.com: “CIA recently updated its FOIA requests policy to allow bloggers to get special treatment once reserved for old-school reporters. Last August, the NSA issued a directive to report leaks of classified info to the media — ‘including blogs.’”

  • American University School of Communication professor Kathryn Montgomery has new book, Generation Digital: Politics, Commerce, and Childhood in the Age of the Internet. Check it out here.

  • Express reports, “Since 2003, many people have been confused about the restaurant at the corner of 21st and M streets NW. Is NBC News’ chief White House correspondent and sometime ‘Today’ show fill-in David Gregory, at right, also a restaurant owner? The answer has always been an emphatic no; after all, the restaurant’s name has one ‘g’ more than the journalist’s. And now, David Greggory — named after chefs and onetime business partners David Hagedorn and Greggory Hill — is no more.”

  • BtoB reports, “As it prepares to celebrate its 25th anniversary in September, Gannett Co.’s USA Today is bucking the downward trend in U.S. newspaper circulation and branching out online to offer the kind of user-generated content that has growing appeal for b-to-b marketers.”

  • Jon Friedman writes, “Gawker gets respectable — and remains humorous”

    Jobs

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a Advertising Sales Representative.

  • Vandenburgh Media is looking for an Advertising Database Manager.

  • AARP is looking for a Web Content Producer and an Online Copy Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext