TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Brad Pitt’s’

Morning Reading List, 09.28.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • 2 Amy’s wins the pizza poll!

  • 2 Clintons, 2 Stories — But Just 1 To See Print

  • Juan Williams: Bill O’Reilly Not A Racist

  • A NBC release announced that “Meet the Press with Tim Russert” “posted an impressive ratings win, outperforming the Sunday morning public affairs competition in all categories during the third quarter of 2007. According to Nielsen Media Research data, the NBC program attracted 3.088 million total viewers during the third quarter,” a 32% lead over ABC’s “This Week”, a 38% advantage over CBS’s “Face the Nation” and a 175% lead over “FOX News Sunday”.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers during the 3Q. This marks the first time that ‘This Week’ beat ‘Face the Nation’ since 3Q 2002. In addition, ‘Meet the Press’s’ 3Q total viewing lead over ‘This Week’ was 35% smaller versus 3Q 2006.”

  • Set your TiVo! A NBC release announced, “In her first-ever live television interview, Jenna Bush sits down with NBC News’ Ann Curry Monday, October 1 on NBC News’”

  • Again: Kurtz v. Silverstein.

  • Washington Post’s “The Post Politics Program,” aired on XM Satellite Radio’s POTUS ’08 program for the first time yesterday. The daily “The Post Politics Podcast” will air each weekday between 2:45 and 3 p.m. ET during “POTUS Live with Joe Mathieu.”

  • A tipster tells us, “Your account of Brad Pitt’s visit to the Post reminded me of a story from 1993, when Denzel Washington spent several days in the Post newsroom preparing for his part as an investigative reporter in the movie version of ‘The Pelican Brief.’ The scene was pretty much the same. Washington used then-National editor Fred Barbash’s office as a base for interviewing various reporters and editors. Barbash asked White House reporter Ann Devroy to take Washington to a White House briefing. Devroy agreed, but as she told some of us later she had absolutely no idea who Washington was until they were walking down 15th Street and passersby started doing double-takes and pointing at the actor. ‘What exactly do you do?’ Devroy asked. Washington explained who he was and what he was doing. ‘Oh,’ Devroy said. ‘I
    couldn’t figure out why people were making such a big deal about the
    new intern.’”

  • 5 Questions for Judy Woodruff.

  • PR Web reports, “Former CNN news anchor and ABC News correspondent Carol Lin has signed with Paul Schur, President of Washington, D.C.,-based PS & ASSOC, to represent her in all areas of public and media relations.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “Dick and J. Edgar Diss Kay Graham

  • OJR reports, “Markos Moulitsas at DailyKos this week raised an important issue to which all journalists who cover the Web ought to show greater sensitivity. Moulitsas complained about a Wall Street Journal article which claimed that Moulitsas’ website held a position on campaign finance reform that is, in fact, the opposite of Moulitsas’ position.”

  • Poynter Online has a letter from Nancy Schwerzler, former Baltimore Sun Washington Correspondent: “Regarding NY Sun’s article on NSA press briefings: It is hardly surprising that the NSA has conducted ‘seminars’ for reporters in an attempt to influence how they reported on national security issues.” Read the full letter here.

  • CJR asks, “Can the government help the press? Should it?”

  • Economist reports, “Although healthier than newspapers, consumer magazines have problems”

  • Regarding the Washington Times hiring freeze question, a reader tells us, “wash times hiring freeze question — there hasn’t really been one. in recent months they brought on sarah carter, andrea billups, and some others. but might be worth exploring how they are poaching metro desk and moving folks to national.”

  • Can you answer CQ’s Political Trivia this week?

  • Fox 28 reports, “A Pentagon source said Wednesday that certain Time Warner e-mails and Web sites have been blocked on Army computers around the world due to a security breach.”

  • vnunet.com reports, “A US-based copyright watchdog has sunk its teeth into Google by sending a report alleging copyright violations on Google Video to members of Congress.”

  • AP reports, “Microsoft Corp. and its hardware partners are trying to bridge the divide between home computers and TV sets this holiday season with the release of several ‘media extenders.’”

  • CNet News.com reports, “The first of the Webcast presidential dialogues put together by MySpace and MTV will debut on Thursday, September 27, with an appearance by former Democratic Sen. John Edwards as he meets with students at the University of New Hampshire.”

  • Multichannel News reports, “News Corp.’s Fox News group, in an overhaul of its online video strategy, is expanding the quantity of video content on FoxNews.com and plans to debut enhanced ‘community’ features on the site of the forthcoming Fox Business Network channel.”

  • E&P reports, “Ever since seven newspaper companies announced with much fanfare an alliance with Internet giant Yahoo in November 2006, scant detail has emerged concerning the revenue upside newspapers expected to reap. More outfits have joined the deal — as of now 17 companies and roughly 400 newspapers — and there is still questions about when the partnership will find its legs.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “Social-media sites are visited mainly by early technology adopters and pose thorny privacy problems but are an increasingly viable channel for news distribution for overwhelmed Internet consumers, panelists at the Emerging Technology Conference said on Wednesday.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission should review the practice of advertisers paying television programmers to feature products in shows to make sure disclosure rules are followed, two lawmakers said.”

  • CNN is dealing with some fall out from the “happy negro” comment.

    Jobs

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter for Pension & Benefits.

  • University of Maryland University College is looking for a Journalism & Photojournalism adjunct professors.

  • The Free Lance-Star Publishing Companies is seeking a Passionate Visual Journalist.

  • The Distilled Spirits Council is looking for a PR Manager.

  • Slate’s Washington D.C. office is hiring a one-year editorial assistant. More details on Craigslist.

  • International Center for Journalists is seeking an Editor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editor for All Things Considered.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for a Web Assistant.

  • Hanley Wood, LLC is looking for a Graphic Designer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Mediabistro Course

    Social Media 201

    Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 leaves off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

    Morning Reading List, 09.25.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think Jon Stewart could totally take Tucker Carlson in a fist fight.

  • CBSNews.com’s Matthew Felling — fresh back from his stint on “Morning Joe” — is hosting today’s “Kojo Nnamdi Show” on WAMU 88.5FM from noon to two.

  • Printing poll on Iraqi deaths would be irresponsible

  • Keith St. Clair, an AME at the Examiner since March 2006, is joining the Associated Press as a Night Supervisor based in Los Angeles.

  • Webpro News reports, “This hot little rumor has been bouncing around through the weekend: Google could be willing to purchase satellite radio provider Sirius.”

  • Brokaw Honored for ‘Taking a Stand for Press Freedom’

  • CNN Election Bus Rolls Through NYC

  • FCC proposes ‘fake news’ fine

  • Market Watch reports, “Shares of Google Inc. hit an all-time high Friday, amid a flurry of upbeat news including new share rankings for the Internet-search market and an analyst’s report on ways the company may one day reach $100 billion in annual revenue.”

  • On “tomorrow’s newsrooms.”

  • Scotsman.com reports, “Peter Chernin, the president of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation, promised the media giant will ‘crush’ the Financial Times after acquiring its big rival in America.”

  • Sage advice for aspiring journalists

  • Clinton campaign kills negative story

  • FT.com reports, “Online advertising spending is widely predicted to continue its strong growth even if a US economic downturn squeezes the advertising sector as a whole.”

  • Mediabistro.com “will mark its 10th anniversary with a gala celebration on Thursday, October 4th at The Plumm, 246 West 14th Street in New York City. To celebrate mediabistro.com’s remarkable growth over the past decade, mediabistro will honor ten individuals whose media careers have skyrocketed during the same period with Golden Boa Awards in the 10 verticals that mediabistro.com serves. Festivities will begin at 7:00 pm.” For more info, click here.

  • Test your news IQ with Pew!

  • A ICFJ release announced, “Anton Kazarin, editor-in-chief of the business magazine group Delovoy Kvartal, has been named winner of the 2007 Paul Klebnikov Fund Prize for Excellence in Journalism. Kazarin will be honored at ICFJ’s Annual Awards Dinner at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., on November 13.”

  • AFF “announced a contest for the best college blog with a grand prize of $10,000. The purpose of the contest is to encourage original liberty-minded blogger journalism on college campuses and to identify young conservative and libertarian talent who wish to pursue careers as journalists and writers. The contest is open to all graduate and undergraduate bloggers age 25 and younger.” For more info, click here.

  • Poynter Online reports, “This week, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee will take up the Free Flow of Information Act of 2007, sponsored by senators Arlen Specter R-Pa. and Charles E. Schumer D-N.Y. There are 10 co-sponsors from the Senate and 71 from the identical House version.”

  • A tipster tells us, “BBC World News America is building a new set in Washington at the moment. They are also preparing for World News Today on Oct. 1.”

  • A Sierra Club release announced, “A former vice president, a New York Times reporter, and a California Assemblyman who have helped raise awareness of global warming are among those receiving awards from the Sierra Club this year.” They include former Vice President Al Gore, Tom Friedman and Congressman Mike Thompson.”

  • Media Matters is calling on readers to contact their local papers and “help end the conservative advantage” of syndicated columnists.

  • The 2007 MacArthur Fellows, awarded by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced on this morning. For more information, click here.

  • Center for American Progress says, “Know Your Sources: The Mainstream Press Keeps Finding Wacky Immigration ‘Experts’”

  • “The Moving Picture Institute will host the world premiere of Indoctrinate U at the American Film Renaissance Film Festival in Washington, D.C. on Friday, September 28, 2007, at 7:30 pm ET at the Kennedy Center’s Terrace Auditorium.” Tickets are available for $10 and can be purchased by calling 877-933-4730 or clicking here.

  • The AP reports, “An experimental online ‘mashup’ — a build-your-own Democratic presidential debate — attracted more than 1 million viewers in the past 10 days, many of them young people drawn to the interactivity of the Internet. … Yahoo, HuffingtonPost.com and Slate.com conceived the format as a way to give online viewers the ability to build a debate with video blocks of each candidate answering different questions on education, health care and the war from PBS host Charlie Rose.”

  • Amy Doolittle is covering transportation issues for DCist.

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “With only one new non-heterosexual regular character this coming season — Bonnie Somerville’s bisexual Caitlin Dowd on ABC’s drama ‘Cashmere Mafia’ — the number of portrayals of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people on scripted network series declined for a third straight year, according to the annual ‘Where We Are on TV’ study by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation.”

  • Guardian reports, “BBC News is to join the media stampede for integration by merging its TV, radio and online newsrooms, although the new set-up will immediately face an annual budget cut of 5% over the next five years.”

  • Ad Age’s Simon Dumenco writes, “Internet Company’s Headed to Big Apple, and This Columnist Is Rooting for the Suddenly Agile Giant”

  • Media 3.0 reports, “MySpace recently announced a deal with Marshall Herskovitz and Edward Zwick, the team behind Thirtysomething and My So-Called Life to create Quarterlife, an online show about post-college twenty-somethings. Unless it was a very slow news day, this would not be on most people’s radar — at least not until the show was a hit. However, what makes this particular press release interesting is that the producers have announced that the hour long show (which will be broken up in to segments for online viewing) will have ‘TV-level production values’ and ‘TV-level production costs.’”

  • New York Times reports, “Media consumers have said, loudly and repeatedly, that they want to watch what they want, when and where they want it. Last week NBC called that bluff, saying that its prime-time broadcast schedule would be there for free downloading for a week after being shown on television. In doing so, the network is leaving behind a business model that is as old as “I Love Lucy”: audiences who make appointments with their favorite shows and who then show up in numbers that open up advertisers’ wallets.”

  • “‘What would students do,’ one journalism researcher wondered, ‘if they got to create a media by them, for them — to create whatever they want, and not have to worry about what’s always been?’” Curious? Insider Higher Ed has the answer.

  • Market Watch’s John Dvorak writes, “With the recent discussions of various news organizations eliminating subscription or paid services, whether it’s Dow Jones & Co. or the New York Times Co., it might be time for shareholders to evaluate the future prospects of all the newspaper-publishing companies.”

  • Boston Globe reports, “Among the investments that Jim Savage, a Waltham venture capitalist, is considering is a North Carolina company introduced to him in an unorthodox way: The entrepreneur posted a comment on Savage’s blog.”

  • AP reports, “The social networking Web site MySpace is launching a free, advertising-supported cell phone version Monday as part of a wider bid by parent News Corp. to attract advertising for mobile Web sites.”

  • Media Week reports, “The Week, Felix Dennis’ tightly edited news digest, has launched a new Web site that will attempt to do every day what the magazine does on a weekly basis.”

  • B&C reports, “PBS is looking to avoid airing profanities ‘in the teeth’ of the Federal Communications Commission’s enforcement regime. While the commission’s crackdown on cussing has been called into question by a federal court, PBS is taking no chances, or at least fewer than it could, with Ken Burns’ documentary, The War.”

  • Yesterday was “National Punctuation Day”

  • ABC Digital Chief: The Network Still Matters

  • The AP reports, “Starbucks Corp. plans to give away 50 million free digital songs to customers in all of its domestic coffee houses to promote a new wireless iTunes music service that’s about to debut in select markets.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Posties Go Wild For Pitt

    bradpittpost.jpg

    (Photo Credit: Kevin Clark)

    FishbowlDC has obtained these messages posted by Posties in the paper’s internal messaging system during Brad Pitt’s visit to the Post newsroom last Friday.

    Can you guess which one is Gene Weingarten’s?

      –Would anyone disagree with me that in the last 30 minutes, the entire newsroom has forfeited its right to ever high-hat pop culture again?

      – as many a child has said to their parents: You guys are embarrassing me!

      – says the woman who passed RB’s office and then double backed on her way to her desk.

      – i’m not in the building, and yet even I am suffused with the glow of His presence via receipt of minute-by-minute accounts from various parties, attesting to the magnificent wonderfulness of the Coming, and the degree of their propinquity thereto.

      – no fair for all far-flung bureau reporters!!

      – i wouldn’t say that. I’m in kabul and I feel like i’m there…

      – he’s ugly, you ain’t missing nuthin’

      – Yeah, well, Clive Owen just showed up at the MoCo bureau, with ELEPHANTS!

    But the best comes from Chuck Lane:

      Geez, it’s not like Peter Sarsgaard just walked in or something.

    Howie Kurtz says:

      He was, in short, acting far more professionally than some of those around him.

      There was no sign of Angelina, whose presence might have endangered the publication of tomorrow’s paper.

    One Postie told FishbowlDC: “Total Beatlemania hysteria going on. It’s kind of embarassing. This must be what it was like when Robert Redford was researching All the President’s Men.”

    Separated At Birth: Helen Thomas

    The gals at Reliable Source reported that Brad Pitt’s next project is a Watergate drama called “Dirty Tricks” “co-starring Meryl Streep as Martha Mitchell, Gwyneth Paltrow as Mo Dean, and Annette Bening as Helen Thomas.”

    Annette Bening as Helen Thomas?! Hmm… What do you think?

    Does Benning…
    Annette.bmp
    (Photo Credit)

    …Look like Thomas?
    Helen.bmp
    (Photo Credit)