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Posts Tagged ‘Bruce Willis’

Morning Reading List, 11.07.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think journos make good dinner guests, or is it that they make better dinner guests than your family?

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the most-watched evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54 for the week of October 29-November 2. Averaging 8.57 million Total Viewers and a 2.1/9 among Adults 25-54, the ABC broadcast outperformed NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 310,000 Total Viewers and 80,000 key demo viewers.”

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC News in partnership with HotChalk is launching today the most comprehensive digital, curricular resource ever available on American presidential politics. The pioneering Decision ’08 resource, designed specifically for classroom
    instruction, offers the latest, up-to-the-minute presidential election news through a video-on-demand user interface, allowing teachers to effortlessly customize their lesson plans with compelling and relevant content to bring the election process and political issues to life.”

  • Eric Boehlert on “Hillary, the debate, and the media folly

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com increased unique visitors 21% to 15.7 million in October 2007, versus the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. ABCNEWS.com saw 150.8 million page views, up 19% from the previous month and 9% year-over-year.”

  • A tipster tells us, “former Washington Times staff photographer Liz O. Baylen, who left the Times in the summer of 2006, has been hired as a staff photographer at the Los Angeles Times.”

  • The CPB announced,Chris Boskin Elected Chair of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting”

  • Radar presents, “The New York Times’ Andrew Rosenthal on Iraq, Times Select, and his father’s secret past”

  • The Washington Times reports, “Is the right-wing conspiracy so vast as to include even Mark R. Levin’s dogs? The conservative talk-radio host disavows any political or ideological motive behind his new book, ‘Rescuing Sprite: A Dog Lover’s Story of Joy and Anguish.’” The book is currently #2 on Amazon’s top 100.

  • PEJ News Coverage Index for the week of Oct. 28 shows, “The presidential race was easily the biggest story in the media last week. But while much of the coverage focused on the attacks on Hillary Clinton at the Democrats’ Drexel University debate, the press also reassessed several other candidates.”

  • Bloomberg reports, ” Google Inc., seeking to expand beyond the Web, said it plans to create a mobile phone operating system for handsets sold by Sprint Nextel Corp. and T-Mobile USA Inc.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Taking the reins at a time of intense pressure for change, Jeff Bewkes, Time Warner Inc.’s chief executive-elect, said he would consider all options for restructuring, and he acknowledged that the media company is unlikely to look the same in two years.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Just minutes after the announcement Monday that Time Warner Inc. chief operating officer Jeff Bewkes was chosen to succeed Dick Parsons as chief executive officer of the conglomerate, rumors of structural changes at the company, including a possible Time Inc. spin-off, started again.”

  • His Extreme-ness launched a new campaign for the Weblog Awards.

  • A reader asks, “Anybody else wondering if the Taylors named their baby after Bruce Willis’ character in Die Hard?”

  • Doug Elfman writes, “Howard Kurtz gave his new book the wrong title. Reality Show: Inside the Last Great Television News War is really about The First Inconsequential Television News War, since it’s obsessed with the current TV news anchors.”

  • PJNet’s Leonard Witt writes, “we have to make a distinction between reporters and the writers who are writers and reporters too. I think in terms of a continuum from straight news reporting to feature writing to literary nonfiction.”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “Five of the nation’s top newspaper companies are taking steps to create a national online advertising network they hope will help them recapture ad revenue leaking away from their print products. Sources close to the situation said Gannett Co., Tribune Co., Hearst Corp., Media News Group and Cox Newspapers may band together to form a common ad sales force that could offer national advertisers ‘one-stop shopping’ for ad space on big-market Web sites across the nation.”

  • MediaWeek reports, “Magazine publishers have heard it all before, and speakers at the American Magazine Conference last week only reinforced it: They are behind on integrated marketing, they need to catch up to consumers’ online habits and their Web sites are dwarfed online by the big foots of the digital world.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Copyrighted work like a news article or a picture can hop between Web sites as easily as a cut-and-paste command. But more than ever, as that material finds new audiences, the original sources might not get the direct financial benefit — in fact, they might have little idea where their work has spread.”

  • Mediabistro says, “Get on your soapbox and pitch ‘Culturebox,’ the Slate section that’s the best way to get in the door,” when pitching Slate.

  • A reader sends us this, “To Chris Anderson…from a flack. This lazy jackass whines because he gets 300 emails a day? That’s sounds like the abridged version of my daily inbox. Tell him to go work at the 7-11 if he can’t handle the overwhelming, time-consuming flood of communications that online journalists like have forced upon us, thanks to their 24 hour newscycle and constant search to make news when there isn’t any.”

  • Stars and Stripes reports, “Stars and Stripes is parting ways with America Supports You, the Defense Department program that gives publicity to groups supporting U.S. servicemembers.”

  • Associated Press reports, “Yahoo Inc.’s chief executive and top lawyer on Tuesday defended their company’s involvement in the jailing of a Chinese journalist. Irate lawmakers accused them of collaborating with an oppressive communist regime.”

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Sunday newspaper sales have fallen to a 32-year low of about 51.3 million, according to projections based on the latest report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “The editor of Timesonline today told the Society of Editors conference that Google was ‘hugely dangerous’ to the newspaper industry.”

  • The Daily Cartoonist reports, “E&P report that Washington Examiner editorial cartoonist Nate Beeler and Chicago cartoonist Eric Allie have been picked up by Cagle Cartoons syndicate. Both cartoonists tend to be right-leaning.”

  • New York Observer reports, “The first President George Bush—the one with two middle names—is 83 years old now and isn’t one to give many interviews. And when he does consent to a sit-down, they always seem to be done with an understanding — either explicitly stated or an agreement between gentlemen — that he is not to be uncomfortably probed about his son’s presidency and the seemingly vast foreign policy differences between father and son. It is probably unfair, then, to blame Chris Wallace, the host of ‘Fox News Sunday,’ for conducting a lengthy, exclusive interview with the former President that left every relevant question unasked.”

  • PRWeek reports, “Salon.com still thriving as brand evolves”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Time Warner Inc. said Tuesday that its chief financial officer, Wayne Pace, will retire at the end of 2007.”

  • Information Week reports, “Big media companies’ efforts to extend copyright are hurting creators’ abilities to find audiences for their work, argues cyber-rights activist Cory Doctorow.”

  • Reuters reports, “Four out of five U.S. adults go online now, according to a new Harris Poll.”

  • Content Bridges reports, “The newspaper industry’s circulation swoon continues, and at a pace that hasn’t changed much over the last three years.”

  • Portfolio looks into “Chris Anderson vs. Public Relations Spam”

  • Jenny 8. Lee is back.

  • Jonah Goldberg writes, “Yes, FEMA’s fakery was foolish. But — and here’s what really bugs me — what isn’t in the TV news business these days?”

    Jobs

  • Talk Radio Network is looking for a Producer.

  • U.S. House of Representatives is looking for a Online Producer and Website Manager.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company, is looking for an Online Ad Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Product & Marketing Manager, Health.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

    This Week In Pool Reports

    Another week on the road for the poolers, and it seems the highlight was Bruce Willis circa 1998.

  • “POTUS departed the hacienda at 10:07 p.m. local time for an uneventful motorcade back to his hotel, arriving at 10:24 p.m. Before leaving, the pool got a head start celebrating the popular and oh-so-wise-for-his-age Chris Edwards’s transition into his fourth decade. A piece of chocolate cake with a candle in it was presented on a plate inscribed in icing: ‘Felicidades. 30 Anos. Chris.’ Felicidades, Chris!” — Peter Baker, Washington Post

  • “Mr. Gallareta happened to be hanging out near the pool at the end literally — it’s the first time I’ve seen a pool hold with a real pool — and he told your pooler the president was interested in everything, but asked in particular about how much of the site is original? Mr. Gallareta said it’s all original stone, but in some cases buildings were deconstructed using the original stone and asked how much of the site has been excavated and preserved.” — Stephen Dinan, Washington Times

  • “Toasts: a mini-pool was escorted back to the main building for toasts before the working lunch. The setting was spectacular, a veranda with all the arched windows opened to reveal another courtyard, this one containing a long rectangular stone pool with a smaller circular one at the end. Half-pots of orchids lined the walls. The Calderon toast was in Spanish and wasn’t translated for the pool — it appeared that POTUS had a translator seated next to him. In his toast, POTUS said their meeting was ‘constructive.’” –
    John McKinnon, Wall Street Journal

  • “The pool traveled on one of a pair of Navy choppers, taking off at 9:09 a.m. and cruising over green rolling fields as hydraulic fluid leaked on a few unfortunate poolers.” — Baker

  • “The ranch is a white house with green trim that to the untrained eyes of your poolers resembled a Bavarian or Swiss chalet. Perched on the water amid a lush expanse of trees, it was a far cry from Crawford. Two small speedboats were parked in a carport of sorts on the side of the house.” — Baker

  • “Meanwhile, it was movie throwback night in the press cabin: The original Die Hard (1988), released back when Bruce Willis had some hair and gas was a mere 74.9 cents per gallon — in Los Angeles. Yippie-ki-aaaay ….!” — David Jackson, USA Today

  • We had a long, hot wait in the sun but eventually, Bush and Lula appeared, surrounded by aides, and wearing white ‘Petrobras’ hard hats. Bush in his shirtsleeves, Lula in a short jacket that looked like a windbreaker. They walked along the line of exhibits, with Bush picking up a stalk of castor seed, fingering some sunflower seeds while unidentified officials and Lula spoke emphatically. Your pool heardalmost none of it, thanks to the engine noise from the nearby idling limo.” — Maura Reynolds, Los Angeles Times