TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Carl Cameron’

Morning Reading List, 02.29.08

4345057.jpg

Happy Leap Day Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:
REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES

  • You think Brit Hume and Major Garrett are hotter than Carl Cameron and Chris Wallace.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The New York Post reports, “Nielsen Business Media has shaken up the ranks at some of its prized trade magazines, naming former Variety group publisher Gerry Byrne as head of the company’s new entertainment group, which includes The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “annett Co., the owner of USA Today, named Robert J. Dickey president of its newspaper division, succeeding Sue Clark-Johnson, who is retiring.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Institute on Political Journalism is hosting a happy hour for journalists at the Science Club on Thursday, March 6 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm. RSVP by Tuesday, March 4 to Joe Starrs at 202.986.0384 or jstarrs@tfas.org, or to Katherine Connell at program_intern@tfas.org.

    Top of post

    TV

  • The Austin Statesman TV writer Diane Holloway writes, “Somebody needs to tell Tim Russert that it’s not all about him. Oh, OK. Let me be the one … During last night’s Democratic debate on MSNBC, Russert was beyond obnoxious. I know he thinks he’s just being a tough journalist, boring into the candidates with long-winded questions and barking, bug-eyed follow-ups. But really, he’s just being rude.”

  • Mark Dawidziak, The Plain Dealer’s Television Critic, writes, “It turned into a good political scrap, thanks to the crisp campaign jabs scored in the second half by Democratic opponents Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama. But it started out as lousy television, thanks to stumbling in the first half by moderators Tim Russert and Brian Williams. … What happened Tuesday night at Cleveland State University’s Wolstein Center? From the opening bell, NBC’s Russert and Williams let the combatants set the rules. In the parlance of the boxing ring, they allowed Clinton and Obama to dance for 16 minutes, tediously dwelling on differences in their health plans.”

  • phillyBurbs.com wrote, “The hype all day long throughout the media was that there would be fireworks at the MSNBC Democratic debate last night. Who would attack first? Who would lose their cool? Some people predicted Obama, most predicted Clinton, but who would have guessed that Tim Russert would be the lunatic of the evening.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Jack Myers.com reports, “This morning, National Geographic will announce a digital initiative they hope will push their Web traffic to new heights. It’s part of a revamp the venerated brand has been undergoing since last Fall with reorganizations, repositioning, management changes and new sales programs. Many of the new initiatives are on its Web sites, which have seen traffic soar since early last year. A significant part of the growth has been from user generated content, especially the ‘Your Shot’ area on the National Geographic Magazine Web site, where people submit photos that are sifted by editors and voted on by users. A select few get published in the magazine.”

  • Wall Street Journal’s Lee Gomes writes, “In New-Media World, Everyone Is Sounding Like a Beltway Insider”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “McCain’s Iraq Barack Attack Shows A Crack”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Folio reports, “While dozens of magazines have partnered with YouTube in recent months to create brand channels, the $1.6 billion video-sharing site wants more.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Bidding for Reed Elsevier’s US magazines — which are currently on the market — is understood to be slow. Titles on the auction block include Variety, the American show biz daily and Publishers’ Weekly. At least one major American company Conde Nast, which everyone thought might be interested, has said it does not even plan to bid.”

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.29.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you did plan on watching the SOTU last night.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Joe Peyronnin has joined Gibraltar Associates as Senior Advisor for Global Communications and New Media. Based in New York City, Mr. Peyronnin brings over 35 years of broadcast news experience to Gibraltar, including as head of news for Telemundo/NBC and Fox News, and as the number two executive at CBS News from 1989 to 1995. He is also the former Washington bureau chief for CBS News and an award winning news producer. Most recently he has worked as a full time corporate advisor to VFinity, creators of innovative digital content management software.”

  • Jossip reports, “Reuters media reporter Robert MacMillan is leaving the wire service for what we’re assuming is a bigger payday at Rupert Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal.”

  • John Fialka is joining the E&E staff on Feb. 6. “He will be leading development of — and then managing — our planned climate publication. John is a superior reporter who has led the Wall Street Journal’s environmental coverage for many years.”

  • CQ announced that Jon Weinstein “has been promoted to senior marketing manager. In this new role, Jon will oversee the circulation marketing team”

  • A release announced, “A Stanford graduate student has been chosen as the 2008 Daniel Pearl Memorial Journalism Intern. Jennifer Martinez is working toward a master’s degree in communication, specializing in journalism, after earning a bachelor’s degree with honors in international relations at Stanford in 2007. She will work in the London bureau of the Wall Street Journal this summer.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The AP reports, “U.S. newspapers’ online audiences grew about 6 percent last year, an industry group reported Thursday, a rare bit of good news for an industry struggling to adapt as readers and advertising dollars continue to migrate online.”

  • The WSJ may get a sports section?!?

  • Is journalist burnout on the rise?”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Harbinger Capital Partners plans to nominate directors for New York Times Co. and Media General Inc., both family-controlled newspaper companies. Harbinger will try to place four directors on the board of New York Times and three on Media General’s, according to statements and regulatory filings yesterday.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Metro International has announced 27 redundancies at its free newspapers in the US. It has been reported that Metro was planning to put the titles up for sales. But Metro announced today it was embarking on a restructuring plan to move the titles into profit — in agreement with joint venture partner The New York Times Company.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • The New York Post reports, “The $27 billion leveraged buyout of radio giant Clear Channel Communications appears to be on solid footing despite scores of jittery investors who feared the deal could fall apart.”

  • The AP reports, “Comcast Corp., the nation’s largest cable operator, said Friday it is pulling the plug on AZN Television, its Asian American channel.”

  • TVNewser reports, “All three cable networks are taking the announcement of Sen. Edward Kennedy’s endorsement of Sen. Barack Obama.” How packed was the rally? Metroblogging DC tell us just how big.

  • The Washington Post reports, “More than 4,000 of the office building’s incandescent light bulbs were changed to fluorescent. Three large water tanks were installed in an underground parking garage to collect rainwater to irrigate a one-acre patch of lawn. Workers held contests to see who could save the most energy by turning off computers and lights. Those efforts were part of a year-long initiative at Discovery Communications’ headquarters in downtown Silver Spring to save energy, and reduce water usage and pollution. Last month, the nonprofit U.S. Green Building Council recognized Discovery’s efforts by certifying its 540,000-square-foot building as “platinum,” the highest designation under the council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program.”

  • The Tampa Tribune reports, “If you’ve been watching Fox News Channel’s election coverage of the primary season, you have seen the beginning of a new era in televised live shots. The live streaming image of chief political correspondent Carl Cameron as he cruises along the nation’s highways in a colorful Ford Expedition may look a little primitive, but it is revolutionary. ‘This is going to change the way breaking news is covered in the future,’ says Brian Wilson, Fox’s Washington bureau chief. After tinkering with various new technologies and video equipment, he says the network has converted a couple of sport utility vehicles into roaming live news centers.”

  • National Journal reports, “Psst! ‘They just spin you up on this and you happily go along,’ fumed Bill Clinton as he glared at CNN reporter Jessica Yellin. She had asked him to respond to Barack Obama and former South Carolina Democratic Party Chairman Dick Harpootlian, who likened the former president to the late bare-knuckle GOP operative Lee Atwater and charged that his wife’s campaign was engaging in ‘the politics of deception.’ Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaigner-in-chief accused Yellin and other reporters of stoking the controversy. ‘This is what you live for,’ Clinton huffed. Not always. Back in 1994, Yellin worked for Bill Clinton in the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Chris Cillizza will be a co-moderator for MySpace, MTV and the Associated Press’ ‘Closing Arguments: A Presidential Super Dialogue’ with Hillary Clinton, Mike Huckabee and other presidential frontrunners that will be presented on-air, online, and on mobile phones, Saturday, February 2, 2008 at 6:00 pm ET.”

  • Check out Tammy Haddad’s video with Hayden Panettiere on Newsweek.com

  • Instapundit points to “an unfortunate turn of phrase at Time Magazine”

  • Bloomberg reports,Peter Thiel, the first outside investor in closely held Facebook Inc., said Sarbanes-Oxley rules make it difficult for technology companies in the U.S. to go public.”

  • Check out The Baltimore Sun’s new military blog.

  • The Local Onliner reports, “Former AOL President and MTV founder Bob Pittman has lately focused on investments as head of the Pilot Group (he is a pilot). In an interview with broadband consultant Will Richmond’s VideoNuze on the eve of the NATPE show in Las Vegas, Pittman says he is bullish on small market TV stations — and their online prospects.”

  • Check out the Facebook Group, “Make Top Reporters Stop Ignoring the Top Issue”

  • The AP reports, Nigel Eccles, a news junkie and former online betting site employee, wanted to try pursuing both interests at once. Thus was born Hubdub — a new Web site Eccles and three colleagues in Edinburgh, Scotland, assembled — where customers will bet for fun, not money, on the outcomes of real news stories.”

  • News and Tech.com reports, “The 13th annual Digital Awards, to be handed out later this month at the Newspaper Association of America’s Marketing Conference, reflects the breadth and depth of video now available on newspaper Web sites.”

  • On Media reports, “Media, tech and Internet companies, and the Wall Street analysts who cover them, are looking beyond the current tumult to the rest of this year and into 2009. Unfortunately, many don’t like what they see.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “Gannett Co. (GCI) acquired Banquet, which operates an action sports Web site and advertisement network. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed.”

  • The Independent reports, “What has been the greatest shock so far in the American election? Barack Obama’s meteoric Iowan rise? Hillary Clinton’s tearful comeback in New Hampshire? John McCain’s resurrection in South Carolina? No. The biggest surprise thus far has been the relative insignificance of the internet in determining the outcome of the election.”

  • A release announced, “For its first recent foray into longer-format video, Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. has won a 2007 Aegis Award for ‘Who Cares? Kiplinger’s No-Nonsense Look at Long-Term Care.’ The 22-minute educational video offers an informative, consumer-friendly review of long-term care—explaining what it is, what it costs, and how to pay for it.”

  • A release announced, “The U.S. Chamber of Commerce today announced the launch of its blog, ChamberPost. The Chamber’s blog provides a real time public platform for issues of importance to the business community.”

  • Reuters reports, “Google-DoubleClick deal likely to win EU go-ahead”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • PR Week reports, “A new survey suggests that trust in business is higher than trust in government in the US and other countries. The results of the ninth annual Edelman Trust Barometer show that the trust gap was greatest in the US, where 58% of respondents said they trust business to do the right thing versus 39% for government.”

  • Fortune’s David Kirkpatrick reports, “European companies like Germany’s Burda are driving toward a software-powered future of blended professional and amateur content.”

  • The New York Times reports,Evan G. Galbraith Jr., a former ambassador to France and a Republican contender for governor of New York in 1994, died Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 79. The cause was cancer, said his wife, the former Marie Rockwell. For 15 years before accepting the ambassadorship in 1981, Mr. Galbraith, who was also an international banker, had been chairman of National Review”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Top of post

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Top of post

    JOBS

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for an Advertising Copywriter.

  • Washington Examiner is looking for freelance Real Estate Reporters.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.18.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington. Today in D.C. history, Marion Barry said “bitch set me up.”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Ben Bradlee could take Robert Novak in a street fight.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has appointed the chief executive of Xerox Corp. to its board of directors. Ann Mulcahy, who has received national attention for turning around Xerox since she took the helm in 2001, will take the 11th post on the board of the D.C.-based company.”

  • Today is Jeff Marn’s last day at Foreign Policy magazine. He is joining the Washington, DC office of Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide.

  • Radar reports that Susan Estrich, ” the Harvard law professor who managed Michael Dukakis’s 1988 presidential bid straight into the ground’, is becoming chief of counsel to L.A.-based business-litigation firm Quinn Emanuel.

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Check out E&P’s “Monthly Top 30 Most Popular Newspaper Sites

  • The Dirksen Congressional Center annonced, “The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. A total of up to $30,000 will be available in 2008. Awards range from a few hundred dollars to $3,500. The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research.” All proposals must be received no later than February 1, 2008.

  • Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler, the author of The Confidante: Condoleezza Rice and the Creation of the Bush Legacy, is the guest of a brown bag lunch discussion held by the World Affairs Council of Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, January 22nd 2008 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM. Sign up here.

  • Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “There has been no shortage of drama in either party’s early presidential primaries, but in the public’s view the Democratic contest has been far more compelling. Four-in-ten Americans (40%) say they find the Democratic primary race very interesting, nearly double the proportion describing the Republican race as very interesting (21%).”

  • The AP reports, “The state of New Hampshire is getting out of the business of issuing identification cards to members of the news media. The man who handled the chore — Jim Van Dongen of the state Department of Safety — says the decision is based on the proliferation of online and specialty news outlets and technology that allows just about anyone to call himself a journalist. Van Dongen says that put him and his bosses in the uncomfortable position of issuing cards to all comers or having to decide who is a legitimate journalist. News organizations now will have to issue their own identification cards for events that require them.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “How much should a company’s culture reflect its chief executive, especially one who prides himself on being a blunt and innovative — some might say abrasive — businessman? If you’re new Tribune Co. CEO Sam Zell, the answer seems to be: A lot. At least that was the feeling workers got Wednesday with the distribution of a new employee handbook, a document that’s nothing like the mind-numbing, lawyered gobbledygook in most corporate manuals.”

  • Daniel Finkelstein writes “an open letter to readers of The New York Times” saying, “I understand that your newspaper of choice has asked William Kristol, the conservative commentator, to provide an opinion column for the paper. Since I am the op-ed editor of what you Americans call The Times of London, I have followed the controversy that the appointment has caused with great interest. And with my mouth wide open.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com achieved record-high unique visitors in December 2007. The site had 16.9 million uniques, an increase of 53% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC=92s measurements. The site also garnered 153
    million page views, up 24% from the previous year”

  • FNS:The Most Quoted Show, Again

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, January 13, 2008. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.714 million total viewers”

  • A CNN release announced, “As the nation honors the 79th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., on Monday, Jan. 21, CNN delves deep into race and politics as it broadcasts the latest Democratic presidential primary debate from Myrtle Beach, S.C., and a live Anderson Cooper 360º special about the influence of race upon politics in America. From 8 p.m. to 10 p.m, CNN will host the two-hour debate with the Congressional Black Caucus Institute, live from the Palace Theater. CNN’s lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer will serve as moderator for the debate, and CNN correspondents Joe Johns and Suzanne Malveaux will serve as panelists questioning the candidates.”

  • FOX News Channel announced, “FOX News Channel (FNC) will provide live coverage of the Nevada Caucus and South Carolina Republican Primary on Saturday January 19, 2008. Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief, Brian Wilson, will host a special Nevada Caucus edition of Weekend Live from 3-5 PM ET. Managing Editor Brit Hume, will anchor You Decide 2008 South Carolina Republican Primary coverage from 6:30-9 PM. A special edition of Hannity & Colmes will follow. FNC’s daytime and primetime coverage will include reports from a team of anchors including Chris Wallace, Megyn Kelly, Bill Hemmer and Martha McCallum. FNC correspondents will be reporting live from both states, including Major Garrett, Steve Brown and Anita Vogel in Nevada, and Chief Political Correspondent Carl Cameron, Wendell Goler and Molly Henneberg in South Carolina. Overall analysis will be provided by The Weekly Standard’s Fred Barnes, National Public Radio’s Juan Williams; Roll Call’s Mort Kondracke; The Weekly Standard’s Bill Kristol and U.S. News & World Report’s Michael Barone.”

  • A CNN release announced, “On Saturday, Jan. 19, you can watch CNN’s live coverage of the Nevada caucuses from noon-3 p.m.* Later that evening from 7:00-10:00 p.m., the Best Political Team on Television will return with results from the South Carolina Republican primary. On Monday, Jan. 21, the CNN/Congressional Black Caucus Institute Democratic primary debate will air live from 8:00-10:00 p.m. out of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Wolf Blitzer moderates; CNN correspondent Joe Johns and White House correspondent Suzanne Malveaux serve as panelists. Anderson Cooper will follow the program with post-debate analysis, and then at 11 p.m., he and Soledad O’Brien will present a new special on race and politics. And, don’t forget, throughout this weekend and every weekend until Super Tuesday, you can watch the candidates uninterrupted and unmediated during Ballot Bowl! Ballot Bowl brings you the candidates’ significant live events in their entirety rather than in sound bite form. Here’s the schedule: Saturday: 3:00-6:00 p.m. (immediately following the Nevada caucuses coverage) Sunday: 1:00-3:00 p.m. AND 4:00-6:00 p.m.”

  • AJR reports, “The media’s addiction to polls and to predicting the future is obviously not new. Critics have railed against it for years. The compulsion to be ahead of the game even caused the television networks to make the wrong call on the 2000 presidential election. You’d think that humiliation was so huge that it would serve as a cautionary whale (hat tip to ‘Juno’ for that great line) as well as a cautionary tale for the political punditocracy. But no.”

  • Yesterday, “CREW and Media Matters for America sent a letter to CNN’s U.S. President Jonathan Klein, asking that former Christian Coalition head Ralph Reed, a proven liar with a deep bias against one of the major Republican candidates, no longer be afforded the opportunity to be a part of CNN’s self-proclaimed “best political team on television.’ Most recently, Reed provided commentary as a ‘Republican strategist’ during the New Hampshire presidential primary.”

  • Media Biz reports, “Are we in a recession or not? Well, investors in the big five media conglomerates seem to think so. Shares of my parent company Time Warner (TWX) are down nearly 5 percent. And it’s not alone. News Corp. (NWS) has fallen 7 percent this year. Walt Disney (DIS) is down nearly 8 percent in 2008. Viacom (VIAB) has shed 9 percent of its value while its former corporate sibling CBS (CBS) has plummeted 14 percent. CBS, Time Warner, Disney and News Corp. are all trading near 52-week lows, and each stock is down between 15 percent and 20 percent for the past three months. Viacom, 2007′s best-performing media stock, has held up slightly better over the past few months thanks to a rebound in ratings at the company’s cable networks, as well as strong box office performance from its Paramount and DreamWorks movie studios. Viacom’s stock is about 20 percent above its 52-week low.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN Correspondent Zain Verjee was hit in the back by a tear-gas canister while covering the protests in Kenya yesterday. Verjee was fired on by Kenyan police, in what she called an ‘unprovoked’ attack.”

  • Jon Stewart took MSNBC and the entire media to task last night on A Daily Show for their focus on, ‘America’s favorite fight starter: Race!’” For more, click here.

  • TVNewser reports, “As part of day-long coverage related to issues of race in America, CNN will present a Democratic candidate debate in Myrtle Beach, SC this Monday, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. day. So far three candidates have met the criteria to attend: Sen. Hillary Clinton, John Edwards and Sen. Barack Obama. A CNN insider tells TVNewser, ‘it still remains possible’ for Rep. Dennis Kucinich to meet the criteria of having 5% support in national polls.”

  • A tipster writes in, “Will the media matters campaign against Chris Matthews yield anything? Yes. A spike in ratings among the media. Let’s just admit it. HRC is never going to receive fair, objective coverage. There’s just too much history. Matthews is just more honest about it than others. We should give him an award.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Tech Crunch reports, “Social travel site WAYN is allegedly in talks with AOL over a possible $200m sale to the consumer portal giant. A spokesperson for the UK startup denied that any sale talks are taking place.”

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “It’s good to see Upton Sinclair back in the news again amid the raves (which I don’t quite share) for the new film ‘There Will Be Blood,’ very loosely based on his 1927 novel ‘Oil!’ Even though Sinclair earned a nod in many of the articles and reviews of the film, which stars Daniel Day-Lewis, few have commented on the original source material.”

  • The Boston Phoenix’s Steven Stark writes, “If the surprise results in New Hampshire had an unanticipated benefit, it is this: they exposed the myth, once and for all, that the Internet has made political reporting and analysis far better than it once was. Alas, the opposite is true.”

  • Media Shift’s Mark Glasser asks, “Major media sites have started to get the religion of audience participation, but there’s been one big hitch: How do you harness the audience’s knowledge and participation without the forums devolving into a messy online brawl that requires time-intensive moderation?”

  • Chris Mooney writes, “As a journalist and especially as a blogger, I sure picked a hell of a time to move to Los Angeles. No sooner did I settle here late last fall than my fellow writers in the film and television industries went on strike. I’ve never done their kind of writing in a professional capacity, but the more I’ve engaged with the issues at the center of the current dispute between the Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, the more I’m convinced that bloggers could soon find themselves making similar complaints against their own employers.”

  • Don Wycliff writes, “I don’t know whether YouTube.com is considered part of the ‘news media’ yet, but in the midst of the Obama-Clinton hoo-hah of the last several days the popular video Web site has performed perhaps the most basic and indispensable function of journalism: to serve, in the words of journalism educators Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Paul Waldman, as the ‘custodian of fact.’”

  • InternetNews.com reports, “Call it a photo finish. A split decision. Too close to call: The leading online tracking firms are split over which Web property garners the most traffic. According to comScore, Yahoo — perennially ranked as the most visited destination on the Web — held onto its lead in December, staving off surging Google for at least another month.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “The editor of The Sun newspaper told a Lords’ Committee the internet edition can’t yet replicate the economic operations of the newspaper.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Google’s expanding lobbying operation scored two significant victories last year: It convinced federal regulators to approve its $3.1-billion purchase of online ad company DoubleClick Inc., and to partially open new wireless airwaves so the company could more easily make its products available on them. Though D.C. veterans say Google has a long way to go before its lobbying clout matches its market valuation, the company is no longer viewed as a wide-eyed Washington freshman.”

  • Business Courier reports, “A social networking Web site that will focus on the 2008 elections was launched Wednesday by E.W. Scripps Co. RedBlueAmerica will serve as a free public forum for user-generated content, including blogs, personal profiles and videos, Scripps said in a news release. It will also offer political news, e-mail service for subscribers, a daily public opinion poll and a feature called ‘Truth or Not’ that will examine ‘the veracity of factual claims made by high-profile newsmakers and others,’ according to the release.”

  • MediaShift reports, “Major media sites have started to get the religion of audience participation, but there’s been one big hitch: How do you harness the audience’s knowledge and participation without the forums devolving into a messy online brawl that requires time-intensive moderation?”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Howard Mortman writes in the Weekly Standard, “Here’s an odd little Hillary Clinton proposal: She wants a government blogging team. At first blush, the idea could cut either way–nutty or silly. We might even call it ridiculous, if we weren’t busy laughing at it.”

  • Alex Kingsbury, associate editor for U.S.News & World Report, was featured Tuesday night on NBC Nightly News as part of a story about gender bias in college admissions, which cited a U.S. News June 2007 special report ‘Admittedly Unequal.’”

    Top of post

    BOOKS

  • The Patriot Ledger reports that Roy Harris Jr., “a former Wall Street Journal reporter and now an editor at CFO magazine” wrote “Pulitzer’s Gold: Behind the Prize for Public Service Journalism,” released yesterday, “is the first comprehensive chronicling of the human dramas, large and small, behind the coveted award.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company is looking for a Advertising Sales Executive, DC.

  • Platts is looking for a Senior Writer.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Associate Producer, Social Media.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Public safety reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Deputy Editor.

  • America Abroad Media is looking for an Online Coordinator.

  • Council for Advancement and Support of Education is looking for a Magazine Editor.

  • Defense Daily is looking for a Reporter.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.14.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington.

    On this day in 1952, the “Today” show premiered, in 1973 the Dolphins became the only one of only two NFL teams to go undefeated during the regular season, and in 2004, President Bush announced we’re going to Mars. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio).

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:
    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • You think Bono is both great and sorta annoying.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Jim Pinkerton quit his Newsday column and resigned his Fox News contract to join Gov. Huckabee as a senior adviser to help fill out his policy proposals. Pinkerton tells Playbook he was lured by Ed Rollins, his boss in the Reagan White House political-affairs office, who said it was a chance to ‘restore the Reagan coalition,’ Pinkerton recalled. ‘I thought, ‘I’m not going to turn THAT down,’ Pinkerton recalled.”

  • Howell Raines joins Portfolio.

  • Sharon Waxman announced she is not returning to the New York Times.

  • Voxant, the new media network announced the appointment of Marcien Jenckes, formerly Senior Vice President of Messaging, Community and Voice at AOL, as its new CEO.

  • Chris Bodenner has joined The Hotline.

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The National Press Foundation is hosting a free, half-day seminar on Thursday to help journalists make sense of the federal budget. Reservations are required by Wednesday. For more info, click here.

  • AP: Covering Britney Spears is a big deal, people.

  • PFAW reports that the Virginian-Pilot has reported that Pat Robinson is interested in purchasing the Norfolk based newspaper.

  • Fox Business reports, “The New York Times Company’s stock on Wednesday hit a price it hasn’t seen in almost two decades. Shares of the company known for its namesake flagship newspaper hit a low of $15.12 yesterday, a price the stock has not seen since 1988. The stock recovered slightly on Thursday, however.”

  • Business Week’s Jon Fine writes, “You’ve Got Tribune. Now Do Something — How new owner Sam Zell can breathe life into newspapers amid widespread malaise”

  • Reuters spoke with Gannett’s newspaper division chief Sue Clark-Johnson about her departure from the company. Check out the interview here.

  • The LA Times wonders if Mike Allen ever sleeps.

  • “The National Press Foundation welcomed three journalists to its Board in 2007, including Jim Brady of washingtonpost.com, Amy Walter of the National Journal’s The Hotline, and Wendy Wilkinson of NBC News.” For the full release, click here.

  • The Hill reports, “Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) is criticizing NBC for disinviting him from an upcoming Nevada presidential debate, and says he is considering legal action. NBC had invited the long-shot candidate on Jan. 9 but rescinded its decision Friday morning, when NBC Political Director Chuck Todd informed the Kucinich camp that the network was ‘redoing’ its participation criteria, according to the campaign”

  • Entries for the Thomas L. Stokes Award for Best Energy Writing are due on January 31. For more info, click here.

  • The Chronicle for Higher Education announced, “The Chronicle has joined with Gallup in a new partnership. The first venture of the Chronicle/Gallup Poll Alliance is designed to help colleges use polling to learn more about how they are perceived by the public.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN, the political network of record, will air LIVE coverage of the House Oversight and Government Reform hearing on the Mitchell Report and the illegal use of steroids in Major League Baseball. Live coverage will begin Tuesday, January 15th at 9:30 AM ET on C-SPAN2 and C-SPAN Radio. The hearing will also be available LIVE through streaming video at: www.c-span.org.”

  • David Carr on Election 2008 being a runaway hit.

  • An NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News’ anchor Brian Williams will moderate a debate among the Democratic presidential candidates Tuesday, Jan. 15, 9-11 p.m. ET, live on MSNBC from the Cashman Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sen. Barack Obama, Sen. Hillary Clinton and former Sen. John Edwards will participate. The debate, to focus on issues important to minority voters, is sponsored by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 100 Black Men of America, IMPACTO, the Democratic African-American Leadership Council, the College of Southern Nevada and the Nevada Democratic Party.”

  • “MASN grabs ‘Rookie of the Year’” writes The Examiner’s Jim Williams.

  • Media Matters on Chris Matthews’ “problem”: “Put simply, Matthews behaves as though he is obsessed with Hillary Clinton. And not ‘obsessed in a charming, mostly harmless, Lloyd-Dobler-with-a-boom-box kind of way. ‘Obsessed’ in a this-person-needs-help kind of way.” Feministing also joins the anti-Matthews movement. CJR reports on “The Anti-Chris Matthews Vote” and AP’s David Bauder also joins in.

  • Mixed Media writes,Bill O’Reilly thinks he knows why everyone gangs up Fox News: because it’s so darn successful.”

  • “If MSNBC anchor Keith Olbermann were to write a book about Office Politics 101, he’d call it ‘Do As I Write, Not As I Did for 20 Years.’ Olbermann discusses office politics and other issues in the February issue of Men’s Journal magazine, out yesterday.” TVNewser has the details.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc., the world’s largest media company, arranged $2 billion in three-year, unsecured financing to repay debt that will be coming due.”

  • Reuters reports, “CBS Corp will see growth in 2008 in ‘every single division’ and no short-term effects from a looming economic downturn or Hollywood’s writers strike, Chief Executive Les Moonves told analysts on Thursday.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A group that includes Google Inc. and Microsoft Corp. accused broadcast-industry lobbyists of interfering with U.S. regulators’ tests of mobile Internet devices that operate on unused television airwaves.”

  • FOX News Channel tell us it had its highest-rated debate/event so far this ’07-’08 political season, according to Nielsen Media Research with the South Carolina Republican event from last Thursday. Check out the AP’s analysis of the debate. TVNewser reports, “In early Nielsen estimates, Fox News Channel’s airing of the GOP debate last night drew 3.6M Total Viewers and 1.04M in the A25-54 demo. If the numbers hold, it will be FNC’s highest rated debate yet and the 5th most watched of this election cycle.”

  • Kucinich Invited, Then Uninvited, to MSNBC Debate

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC Chief Political Correspondent ‘Campaign’ Carl Cameron tells TV Guide’s Stephen Battaglio he still thrives on Presidential campaign coverage: ‘There is absolutely no story anywhere in the world that is this significant. It’s the struggle for leadership in the free world. That’s better than any adrenaline or Red Bull you could possibly imagine.’”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Check out the special edition of American Observer put together by the AU journalism students while they were on the campaign trail in New Hampshire.

  • Former Gannett-er Jim Hopkins tell us “10 things” about him.

  • Dow Jones reports, “News Corp. (NWS) denied Thursday making any offer for Monster Worldwide Inc. (MNST), calling a report on the Seeking Alpha blog untrue. Seeking Alpha reported that News Corp. head Rupert Murdoch sent a letter to the board of the online-recruitment company offering $4.8 billion for it. Monster has a market cap of $3.6 billion.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Yell Group Plc, the publisher of the U.K.’s Yellow Pages phone books, had its biggest gain in London trading in a month on speculation about a bid from Google Inc. Yell rose as much as 4.4 percent, the biggest increase since Dec. 10. The stock climbed 5.50 pence, or 1.7 percent, to 331.25 pence at 8:37 a.m. in London, valuing the company at 2.6 billion pounds ($5.1 billion).”

  • Mickey Kaus continues to hate on Ezra Klein, asking “Is Ezra Klein young enough to be this pompous?”

  • Today, “MonkeySee.com (Great Falls VA) will officially launch a new how-to video site. Visitors to MonkeySee.com can access both free professionally-produced content as well as user-generated video of real experts sharing knowledge, demonstrations, and tips for more successful living on topics that range from fitness to finance and cooking to careers.”

  • Wonkette reports, “we were very pleased this morning to see that Peggy Noonan, our nation’s most beloved newspaper columnist since 1911, mentioned our New Hampshire coverage and a particularly Victorian bit of high-minded satire we dropped along the way”

  • E&P reports, “Calling it a “nationwide experiment,” The New York Times on Thursday launched a new program asking online readers to submit photos of polling places during the ongoing primaries and general election. Dubbed the Polling Place Photo Project, the online initiative hopes to get photos from every polling place in the nation, according to a release.”

  • Street Insider asks, “Could Microsoft (MSFT) Buy Yahoo (YHOO)?”

  • “After a year-long hiatus, NPR’s Office of the Ombudsman is back in business with a weekly Wednesday column, radio appearances and talks.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • The Washington Note reported Friday, “An American journalist, Nicholas Schmidle, who authored the article ‘Next Gen Taliban’ that appeared in Sunday’s New York Times Magazine has been deported from Pakistan. He was forced to leave today — Friday, 11 January.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Meet the new twit, same as the old twit. It’s the media, of course. They got it wrong again this week, covering the Democrats in New Hampshire. The think-tankers will be mulling this one for years. After all, they’ll say, we’re not just talking about a few bad predictions here and there. The best brands in the business led the public astray

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The HealthCentralNetwork.com is looking for an Executive Producer.

  • www.HealthCentral.com is looking for a Web content producer.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer (Washington Bureau.

  • Bloomberg is looking for a Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac Reporter.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Specialist, Renewals.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • Leading Authorities Inc is looking for a CEO Update Editor-in-Chief.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Manager, Group Planning.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Director, Associate Creative.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Marketing Manager, Digital Media.
  • The Chronicle Newspapers is looking for an Editor.

  • NPR is looking for a Producer 1, Digital News, News & Information, Editor l, ll, or lll, Digital News, News & Information and a Production Assistant, NPR Music.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

  • The Atlantic is offering an Editorial Internship.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • Petersburg Progress-Index is looking for a Sports Reporter/Paginator.

  • FoxSports/Scout.com is seeking a Baseball Reporter.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • One Way To Stay Warm in Iowa

    From Hotline’s Nora McAlvanah: Fox News’ Carl Cameron fires one up (cuz he’s ready to go) before a live shot.

    brith.JPG

    Morning Reading List, 11.19.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • National Journal reports, “Average time spent consuming news on a typical workday,” broken down by type of Washingtonian.

  • The Pew Talk Show Index for November 4-9 shows, Dennis Kucinich’s call to impeach Vice President Cheney made nary a blip with the general media last week but it was a big story on in the talk media, especially on the left side of the talk radio dial. Meanwhile the many angles of the 2008 campaign gave everyone grist to talk about.”

  • Deb Howell weighs in on Tim Page.

  • Media General D.C. Bureau Shuffle Cuts Staff, Expands Web

  • NYT on Shep Smith: “Fox Cable Guy Edges Into the Big Pay Leagues

  • When it comes to Newsweek’s hiring of Rove and DailyKos, CJR says they “couldn’t be more predictable.”

  • From DCRTV:

      Adrienne Mitchell will host a new show on DC-based XM Satellite Radio’s presidential election channel “POTUS ’08″ (XM-130) starting Monday, 11/19. The former WTOP anchor and editor will host “The Race” weekdays from 7 PM to 9 PM. The show will focus on the campaign news of the day, plus interviews with journalists and newsmakers…..

  • Inside Cable News & Brian Stelter: Together.

  • Jack Shafer on “Big Media Octopuses, Cutting Off Tentacles” and “Why Newspapers Love the Striking Screenwriters

  • Inside Cable News’ What’s Hot/What’s Not.

  • Local Oscar hopes for Sean and Andrea Nix Fine and Ted Leonsis.

  • Can you answer CQ’s political Trivia for November 16?

  • An RCN release announced, “RCN Corporation … will be a Corporate Partner of MLS Cup 2007, Major League Soccer’s Championship game between the New England Revolution and the Houston Dynamo, which will be held Sunday, November 18, at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C.”

  • “SAIS International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellows Libby Casey, a reporter with KUAC-FM in Fairbanks, Alaska; Eliza Barclay, a freelance print reporter in Mexico City; and Krista Kapralos, a reporter with the The Herald in Everett, Washington, will discuss their overseas reporting experiences. Members of the public should RSVP to IRP at irp@jhu.edu or 202.663.7726.”

  • Check out FNC’s Carl Cameron new blog from the campaign trail.

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press writes, “Nice Try, CBS, But Rather’s Lawsuit Has Merit”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. said Friday its ad sales from continuing operations dipped 0.7 percent in October on softness in its publishing division. Total revenue from continuing operations edged up 1 percent.”

  • Matt Welch writes, “The funniest thing about anti-media activists — whoops, I mean “public interest groups” — is that their sky-is-falling brief against big media consolidation always (and I mean always) disintegrates on contact with what I like to call “personal experience.” As in, theirs. And mine.”

  • National Journal’s Bill Powers writes, “The leading candidate is a woman, and trailing her are a mixed-race man and a white man. Thus, the contest must be all about gender and race, right? Well, no. But that’s how the media coverage of the Democratic presidential race often reads.”

  • From Mike Allen’s Playbook, “The next time you stop by the White House press room, be sure to admire Julie Mason’s rocking ‘rocket-red’ ‘do. Ed Henry has a new 20-YEAR calendar. Playbook booked him for his birthday in 2009 – we were both open!”

  • Public Eye reports, “Game, set, match, asterisk. The contest/discussion about who or what will be Time’s ‘Person of the Year’ is over. It’s Steroids. Yesterday’s federal indictment of Barry Bonds only sealed the deal.”

  • Susan Katz Keating reports, “This just in… The New Republic is scrambling to fill ‘an immediate opening’ for an editor to run its fact-checking shop. What happened to the old fact-otum? Has the prior chief been banished in the wake of L’Affair Beauchamp? As you will recall, Scott Thomas Beauchamp, an Army private, created quite a stir with his wild stories of American soldiers misbehaving in Iraq. The stir became a scandal when it turned out the stories were fabricated. Now it looks as if TNR wants to make sure this type of thing doesn’t repeat itself.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes,Mimi Valdes Ryan has a tough job. On Nov. 5, she became the top editor of Latina, a magazine and Internet operation, which is run by Latina Media Ventures and caters to Hispanic women.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABCNews.com Changes, Again”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Why Does Fox News Favor Giuliani? Well, Lots Of Reasons”

  • Politico’s Ryan Grim looks into “The art of the leak”

  • Murdoch’s free WSJ.com could hurt parts of Dow

  • E&P reports, “It’s not often you see The New York Times’ editorial board joining forces with outsiders to promote political discussions. But that is just what the newspaper’s opinion-makers are doing through the ’10 Questions’ project, an online effort aimed at getting presidential candidates to answer YouTube-style questions chosen by online users.”

  • Guardian reports, “Gannett, the US newspaper chain, is to cut 45 jobs in the newsroom at its flagship title, USA Today. The paper will start with voluntary redundancies and then, if that doesn’t provide the full quota, it will demand mandatory redundancies.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Google Inc. made a big splash last week with its new software for cellphones. But that’s far from the limit of the Internet giant’s wireless ambitions — which could include running its own mobile network.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A key U.S. lawmaker urged Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin to delay his plans for a Dec. 18 vote on a media-ownership rule change that would benefit Tribune Co. and News Corp.”

  • FT.com reports,Rupert Murdoch’s six children are getting an early Christmas present after the family trust Mr Murdoch controls sold more than $360m worth of News Corp shares. The cash pay-out follows a $600m bonanza received by the siblings in February — at the time the biggest distribution of Mr Murdoch’s fortune.”

  • B&C reports, “Former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) will be the first presidential candidate to picket personally with Hollywood’s striking writers”

  • Lisa de Moraes writes, “David Letterman’s overall audience with reruns was on par with the previous week with original episodes — 4 million viewers. And he gained eyeballs in TV’s key demographic groups, including the Holy Grail — the 18-to-49-year-olds.”

  • CNBC reports, “A video made by the Writers Guild is circulating the web. As of now, it’s been seen 111,000 times on Youtube. It dramatically argues that the studios are cashing in on digital distribution and the writers aren’t getting a penny.”

  • Beet TV reports, “The Nielsen numbers for online traffic at newspapers, which came out yesterday, show a significant jump in unique visitors to the NYTimes.com for October.”

  • New York Post reports, “The lucrative business of selling Web ads has become so fragmented — and easy to do — that even Martha Stewart has thrown her hat in the ring by setting up an online advertising network.”

  • Reuters reports, “Leading European publishers are coming to terms with what teenage boys and men have known for years — the Web beats magazines in grabbing their eyeballs.”

  • Business Week reports, “IAG delivers precise data on which TV ads are resonating. Now it’s headed online”

  • Folio reports, “Time Warner’s third quarter numbers were released recently, and while overall revenues rose nine percent over same period 2006—despite revenue declines from AOL—Time Inc.’s revenues were flat.”

  • Bed Bugs Found in Fox News Channel Newsroom

  • Poynter Online Steve Outing reports, “This week I gave a presentation to one of Sandra Fish’s journalism classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder. (It was an overview of social media and citizen journalism initiatives). I hadn’t been in front of a bunch of college students in a while, so I took the opportunity for a quick news-consumption quiz. I did a pretty good job of guessing in my head beforehand what the responses would be, but my prediction proved a little off when it came to print editions of newspapers.” Check out the results here.

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “The New York Times Op-Ed page hasn’t been this hot in a long time. Now we are experiencing Columnist Wars, with Bob Herbert this week joining in a rapidly escalating battle between Paul Krugman and David Brooks – largely over an incident involving Ronald Reagan at a local fair over 27 years ago.”

  • Mother Jones reports, “With all the articles that have been written about the TV writers’ strike (how crappy the signs are, Eva Longoria’s strike breaking, neonatal guild members birthed onto the picket line, career-change opportunities for Hollywood hacks, and Dowd’s space filling), no attention has so far been paid to the real victims here.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s announcement this week that he expects to stop charging for access to the Wall Street Journal’s Web site is the latest example of a publisher giving up on the subscription-based business model — a significant shift in the evolution of online content.”

  • Fool.com reports, “Murdoch announced at a meeting of News Corp. shareholders Tuesday: ‘We … expect to make [WSJ.com] free, and instead of having 1 million [subscribers], having at least 10 [million to] 15 million in every corner of the earth.’”

  • Washington Post reports, “The District will have to renegotiate a proposed deal to bring broadcasting company Radio One to the city after D.C. Council members rejected a plan to give the developers city-owned land worth $6 million on which to build the project.”

  • B&C reports, “Veteran Fox News Channel critic Robert Greenwald (Outfoxed) opened a second front in his campaign against the top-rated cable news channel, this time aiming to get advertisers to drop their sponsorships.”

  • Wall Street Journal’s John Fund writes, “Lou Dobbs for President? Don’t laugh. After months of telling reporters that he “absolutely” would not consider leaving his highly-rated CNN show in which he crusades against free trade and illegal immigration, Mr. Dobbs posted a commentary on his Web site last week predicting a surprise new presidential candidate in 2008.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., its chief executive and Chairman Sumner Redstone, said a lawsuit filed by former news anchor Dan Rather is an attempt to ‘settle old scores’ and should be dismissed because of its ‘far-fetched allegations.’”

  • AFP reports, “The emergence of ‘smartphones’ has put the Internet, music and videos in the palm of the consumer’s hand, but the technology will need a flow of advertising cash to reach its full potential.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., owner of the most-watched television network, probably would take the biggest hit in a prolonged strike by TV and movie writers.”

    Jobs

  • The Magazine Group is looking for a Circulation Manager.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for an International Book Licensing Representative.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Special Sections Editor.

  • International Center for Journalists is seeking a Training Editor — Persian.

  • Army Times Publishing Company is looking for a Reporter to cover Federal Government.

  • Maryland Beachcomber/Worcester County Times/Ocean Pines
    Independent is looking for a Paginator.

  • Worcester County Times is looking for a staff reporter.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Director, NPR Digital Media.

  • Howard University is looking for a Director of Communications and a Publications Manager.

  • The Hill is looking for a Political Editor.

  • Edleman is looking for a New Media Account Supervisor.

  • BusinessWeek Magazine is looking for a Correspondent for business, money, policy and politics and a legal Correspondent.

  • Center for Independent Media is offering an Online News Fellowship

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Boughton Becomes Fox Political Unit Director

    FishbowlDC has learned that current FNC Washington Deputy Bureau Chief Bryan Boughton will be taking a sabbatical from his current position to serve as the Director of the Political Unit at FOX News in DC, working hand-in-hand with current team lead Dave Shott to drive coverage of the 2008 election. Additionally, FNC’s Major Garrett will be hitting the campaign trail to cover the candidates, partnering again with FNC Chief Political Correspondent Carl Cameron to bring the latest from the field.

    Morning Reading List, 09.05.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington and Happy September.

  • You are not ready for summer to be over. We aren’t either.

  • Can you answer CQ’s Political Trivia? No peeking!

  • What did you think of the Politico’s redesign?

  • The Washington Post reports, “John Jay Geddie, 70, a reporter and editor who started a newspaper in Loudoun County three years ago, died Aug. 22 at Inova Fairfax Hospital of kidney failure and pneumonia related to treatment for skin cancer. He lived in Sterling.”

  • Spend an evening with Peter Bagge, reason’s resident cartoonist, tonight at 1747 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC. Doors open at 6.30 p.m.; program begins at 7 p.m. RSVP to mailto:events@reason.com

  • Getting Ready in the Granite State

  • It doesn’t happen often: Olbermann bests O’Reilly.

  • Politico’s Jonathan Martin is “venturing off the eaten path” with his new feature, Trail Mix. “Now I’m asking you to ensure that all my surprises are good ones. I want to hear about the best, most out-of-the-way kitchens in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina.”

  • Felling to take a taste of Morning Joe.

  • B&C reports, “The Third Circuit Federal Court of Appeals in Philadelphia will not allow C-SPAN to televise the oral arguments in CBS’ challenge of the Federal Communications Commission’s indecency finding against the Janet Jackson/Justin Timberlake Super Bowl reveal back in 2004.”

  • Some of you wondered what happened to the Politico’s planned “Welcome back to Congress” issue yesterday. One Politico’r explains: “The Tuesday issue was, in essence, a welcome back issue, focusing on all the fight ahead, as you can see from stories. We will not be doing big full special issues, rather more targeted and focused coverage of specific areas.”

  • See Martha Raddatz’s interview with Gen. Petraeus. This is Raddatz’s 14th trip to Iraq.

  • The media’s Katrina malpractice

  • Mediabistro is hosting “The Future of Design” tonight, a panel discussion on what’s driving change in the design industry. The event is 7-9 pm at Cooper Union’s Wollman Auditorium, 51 Astor Place in New York. Cash bar reception to follow at Central Bar, 109 E. 9th Street. For more info, click here.

  • The DC Metro Moms Blog officially announced yesterday. It is a collaborative group of moms writing about their lives in Washington, D.C. Check it out here.

  • Jessica Taylor is starting as a Staff Writer/Online Producer at NationalJournal.com this week.

  • From the College Democrats Weekly Update 9/2/2007: “The UF College Democrats have received an invitation to see Helen Thomas speak in Orlando! On Friday, September 21 at 7 p.m., Helen Thomas, White House correspondent and author, will give a talk at the Orlando Public Library. … Tickets are $50 for non-library card holders.”

  • A reader points out this goof on the CBS Evening News: “Couric is in Iraq, got an intv with Bush. Swell, right? They ran the package and an audio track was missing on playback so we couldn’t hear the natural sound (troops cheering, etc.) AND at least one Bush soundbite had no audio so we could see him talking but couldn’t hear anything. This was the trip that was supposed to boost ratings…right? Whoops.”

  • A reader provides clarification on this, pointing out that podcasts are completely separate from paid downloads. Providers of paid downloads make a deal with iTunes for the programs to be sold at the iTunes online store. Providers of podcasts host the programs on their own sites — and iTunes simply provides links to the podcasts, grouped by subject or provider. So there is no “deal” regarding podcasts between iTunes and the vast majority of podcast producers, meaning you will still be able to get the MTP podcast on iTunes.

  • The Independent’s Stephen Glover writes, “The press has a new growth area — writing about itself on Wikipedia.”

  • Vanity Fair’s Michael Wolff writes, “In every newsperson, not just Rupert Murdoch, there’s the dream of owning a newspaper—my paper. This retro dream is why, for the past six months, every Wednesday morning, I’ve been on a conference call about the subject of software design and digital engineering as it relates to the news. Although the discussion is specifically about how to make the news exciting (come on, guys, if it bleeds it ledes), it is often as tedious an hour as any I remember from high-school math. I’ve been able, however, using the mute button, to shower during these calls.”

  • AP’s David Bauder writes, “South Dakota Sen. Tim Johnson turned to Woodruff for a ‘Nightline’ report on his recovery and return to public life this week following a brain hemorrhage. The Democrat probably figured no other reporter would better understand what he went through. Woodruff has quietly returned to work full time at ABC following the January 2006 bombing in Iraq that nearly killed him, already traveling to Cuba, Syria and throughout the United States to report stories.”

  • Over Labor Day weekend, PolitiFact.com was launched, “a new Web site from the St. Petersburg Times and Congressional Quarterly that scrutinizes the accuracy of claims made by presidential candidates.”

  • CJR takes a look at Talking Points Media.

  • Check out TVNewser’s five questions with Fox News Channel’s Carl Cameron, the host of a GOP Presidential debate tomorrow night.

  • Freelance Switch offers this PSA: “The 10 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make, and How to Avoid Them.”

  • Salon has a confessional from a gossip addict.

    Jobs

  • The Hill newspaper is looking for an Online Video Producer.

  • The United States State Department is looking for a U.S. Diplomat/Foreign Service Officer.

  • www.HealthCentral.com is looking for a Web content producer.

  • Farmworker Justice is looking for a Communications Coordinator.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Producer, All Things Considered, a Research Manager, Special Projects and a Listener Corespondence Supervisor.

  • Al Jazeera English is looking for a Package Producer, an Editor of the Day and a News Editor.

  • DISCUS is hiring a public relations manager with strong interest in luxury consumer goods PR. Three to five years public relations/special event/journalism experience required. $50K+ and outstanding benefits. Fax, e-mail or mail resume with cover letter to: FAX: 202-682-8896, HR@discus.org or Human Resources, 1250 Eye Street NW Suite 400, Washington, DC 20005.

  • Congressional Quarterly is hiring a Politics Reporter, a Social Policy Editor, a Multimedia Web Producer and a Homeland Security Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.12.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Roll Call’s Emily Pierce has been named a Senior Staff Writer.
  • CJR reports, “the present wave of cost- cutting, job-eliminating, and bureau-closing is just one reason journalism is widely believed to be an industry in crisis. But a pair of university studies concerning the profession’s past and future may slightly temper fears of its imminent demise.”
  • A reader points out that Senator Barack Obama spoke with Carl Cameron this afternoon regarding McCain’s announced position on the Iraq war. A few heads are scratching about Obama’s appearance, since he pulled out of the Fox debates two days earlier…
  • The Corner’s reaction to Ana Marie Cox pulling out of the “Imus” show: “And I Thought She Was, Like, Soooo Un-PC…”
  • moneylaundering.com is looking for a reporter for Money Laundering Alert.

    Loads more when you click below…

    Read more

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.23.07

  • Overwhelming, digital beats out film.

  • Glen Greenwald weighs in on Politico.com’s snafu: “What is happening at The Politico seems clear. That newspaper is filled with super-insider Beltway types who have all sorts of friends in various Washington crevices. They are constantly chatting with one another, exchanging all sorts of speculation and gossip, and always engaged in a perpetual competition to demonstrate who is the most keyed-in to the super-inside Beltway developments.”

  • The Pew weekly News Interest Index finds that the “controversy over the firing of eight U.S. attorneys is not attracting strong public interest in spite of intense media coverage of the story.”

  • National Journal is hiring an Editorial Operations Manager.

  • Washingtonian’s Todd Kliman in his own food fight (and Stephen Hunter gets cut from his own movie…)

  • The Yomiuri Shimbun is hiring a reporter/research assistant in their Washington Bureau.

  • National Geographic Society is hiring an account coordinator for online services.

  • The American Cancer Society is hiring a Senior Manager of Media Advocacy.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Budget/Appropriations Reporter.

  • A Fox release announced, “At 7:14 PM ET, FNC’s Chief Political Correspondent Carl Cameron confirmed live from independent sources that Philip de Vellis created the anti-Clinton video,” making FNC the first to report the news.

  • A reader says, “Wow — washingtonpost.com’s multimedia department is at it again — did you see this on Antarctica this morning?”

  • E&P reports that a survey by a Butler University professor found that most newspaper city editors “indicate at least some satisfaction with their ever-demanding jobs, and believe that they do a good job of encouraging reporters and advising on stories.”

  • A NPR release announces that NPR and NPR member stations “nationally applaud FCC approval of digital HD Radio mutlicasting.”

  • We asked and Wonkette delivered with some Chuckalicious pictures.

  • << PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>