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Posts Tagged ‘Christopher Buckley’

Hitchens Reading List 12.19.20

With the passing of Vanity Fair Contributing Editor Christopher Hitchens came an outpouring of personal stories by journalists about their relationship with their friend, their mentor, their hero and in one case, someone they had met just once. We rounded them up for you here with a poignant line or excerpt.

Portrait by Patrick Ryan.

The Weekly Standard/Daily Caller’s Matt Labash writes for Slate on traveling with Hitchens in Iraq. “After a protracted tussle in which Yacoub demanded Hitchens’ press badges, then after a cooling off in which he gave them back, then after a resumption of hostilities when Hitchens decided he didn’t want his Kuwaiti press badge back as the Kuwaitis were proving themselves the tramplers of liberty, Yacoub screamed that Hitchens would ‘leave Kuwait tonight!’ It’s pretty hard to get kicked out of a war. But Hitchens almost managed.”

David Frum writes about the man he couldn’t resist even after meeting him.

Washington Photographer Patrick Ryan once spent a morning smoking and drinking with the great writer. “He came over to greet me wearing socks and we immediately started talking as though we’d known each other for years.”

Townhall columnist and WMAL’s Derek Hunter writes about the pitfalls of Hitchens’ literal interpretation of everything. Like vodka for instance. Or toads. “Speaking of emails, I remember one that he signed, ‘Wishing you well in this toad-filled season.’ I thought, ‘What the Hell does that mean?’ I Googled it, I asked everyone. I found nothing to explain it. Finally I asked Grover if he knew what it meant, because I didn’t want to ask Hitchens and risk looking stupid. Grover looked up from his desk and said, ‘I don’t know. Maybe he’s just some place with a lot of toads.’”

WaPo syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker wrote about how she “devoured” Hitchens’ writing. Eventually she met him one day in the makeup room of NBC. “To say I was a friend of Hitchens would be an exaggeration, though I did enjoy the pleasure of his company on several occasions. But one needn’t have known a writer to mourn his passing or to feel profound sadness about all the silent days to come. No matter what the topic, I always wanted to know what Hitchens thought about it and, lucky for the world, he seemed always willing to end the suspense.”

Christopher Buckley‘s was fittingly among the first eulogies to emerge on Hitchens in The New Yorker. He starts out, “We were friends for more than thirty years, which is a long time but, now that he is gone, seems not nearly long enough.”

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Christopher Hitchens Dies

One of Washington’s most revered writers, Vanity Fair‘s Christopher Hitchens, has died. He spent much of the week surrounded by family and loved ones at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Washington media outlets have been preparing for the news. Hitchens is survived by his wife, Carol Blue, and their daughter, Antonia, and his children from a previous marriage, Alexander and Sophia. He was 62.

Vanity Fair announced the news just before midnight Thursday:

It is with tremendous sadness that Vanity Fair announces the death of our contributing editor and dear friend Christopher Hitchens. Christopher died today from pneumonia, a complication of esophageal cancer, at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

“There will never be another like Christopher. A man of ferocious intellect, who was as vibrant on the page as he was at the bar,” said Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter. “Those who read him felt they knew him, and those who knew him were profoundly fortunate souls.”

Dec. 16, 2011: Goodbye from Christopher Buckley….read here.

See the CBS “60 Minutes” interview with Hitchens from earlier in the year.

June 4, 2010: The Original Announcement: “I have been advised by my physician that I must undergo a course of chemotherapy on my esophagus. This advice seems persuasive to me. I regret having had to cancel so many engagements at such short notice.” See here.

July 2008: Hitchens gets waterboarded at the request of VF Editor Graydon Carter. Watch here.

His final interview with Richard Dawkins.

Could Hitchens ever be a Christian? The Atlantic‘s Jeffrey Goldberg declares on Dec. 13, 2011, that Hitchens has not found God.

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Morning Reading List 06.015.09

Good morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Happy Birthday to Dana Bash! Former Fishbowler Patrick Gavin is filling in for Politico‘s media blogger Michael Calderone this week- don’t read! What we know and what we’re reading this Monday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE | MAGAZINE | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

The AP announced at the IRE Conference in Baltimore this weekend plans to distribute watchdog and investigative journalism from nonprofit organizations to its 1,500 member newspapers. More details in this press release.

Potential buyers of the Boston Globe are emerging.

Related- NYT‘s David Carr: What Price Would You Put On The Boston Globe?

TV

From The Daily Beast- the 7 Best Moment From Sunday Talk.

NYT‘s Maureen Dowd takes a look at the new look of TV, high definition. MSNBC’s Norah O’Donnell: “But people like authenticity. And if it means they see more of my wrinkles and freckles, and where I tried to wipe clean where my kid spit up on my shoulder, so be it.” CBS’ Bill Plante: “You go in knowing every mole and random facial hair will be visible to somebody watching closely.”

FOX News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace is featured in a Q&A with the Boston Globe‘s Doug Most. He talks about why he’s a registered Democrat (because he lives in D.C.), his favorite TV show (“24″) and his most memorable interview (this one). More at TVNewser.

HLN anchor Robin Meade and former President George H.W. Bush were skydive partners Friday in Maine. They celebrated his birthday and also sat down for a lengthy interview, with questions on the economy Judge Sonia Sotomayor and his son’s legacy. TVNewser has the highlights here.

Is MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough the new face of the Republican Party? Christopher Buckley explores that idea on The Daily Beast.

CNN’s Anderson Cooper will sit down with UNHCR ambassador Angelina Jolie and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for interviews to air on World Refugee Day June 18th.

ONLINE

Why are Twitter-ers annoyed with CNN? WebNewser has the answer.

“Twitter is the teeny bopperification of America, the dumbification of America.” That was CBS Sportsline’s Gregg Doyel, debating CNN’s Rick Sanchez yesterday also on CNN’s “Reliable Sources” with Howard Kurtz.

More from Kurtz in today’s WaPo: “Twitter users are exchanging more than just 140-character bursts of blather about their daily lives: They are guiding their friends and followers to the latest news, information, gossip, snark, and a pulsating, real-time debate. Old-style news outlets would kill for that sense of belonging.”

HuffPost’s Nico Pitney has been liveblogging about the situation in Iran, with the latest pics and video. Read in here.

MAGAZINES

From NYT, Conservative Magazines: Their Vision Isn’t G.O.P’s. “At The Weekly Standard, the point is “to air our views,” said Fred Barnes, executive editor of this newsy, inside-the-Beltway magazine. “A lot of people want to write for us about the future of the Republican Party. We’re not that interested in that. We’re not that interested in the future of Republicans or conservatives. We’re interested in Obama.’”

NEWS NOTES

In light of Laura Ling and Euna Lee‘s situation in North Korea, NYT‘s Brian Stelter takes a look at the new dangers facing today’s journalists.

Why did White House senior advisor David Axelrod leave journalism? In a commencement speech at DePaul University near Chicago, he said of his start in media, “Journalists heped save the republic, and I wanted to be a part of that. But, over time, things changed. By the mid-1980s, journalism was becoming more business than calling. The front office began to take over the newsroom. The emphasis went from veracity to velocity, from reporting to receipts.” (h/t Chicago Sun Times)

WEST WING REPORTAGE

NYT‘s Frank Rich: “The Obama Haters’ Silent Enablers.”

Politico’s Calderone: “Obama, W.H. woo the Gray Lady.”

AP: Another Obama relative has a book deal. A memoir by George Obama, the president’s half brother and a resident of Huruma, Kenya, will be published by Simon & Schuster in January 2010. George Obama, 27, shares the same father with his famous, older half sibling.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro, HuffPost Media

JOBS after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 12.02.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 10.28.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Kurtz: Nothing Wrong With Debates In Opinion Pubs

Earlier today, Howard Kurtz held his weekly chat where he covered such topics as Christopher Buckley‘s resignation from the National Review; the endorsement process of major newspapers; and the media coverage of “Joe the Plumber” vs. that of William Ayers. Some excerpts:

New York, N.Y.: It seems to be common wisdom by both sides that Obama will be the most left-wing president since LBJ, if not FDR. That being the case, why is it “intolerant” for National Review to drop Christopher Buckley’s column as a result of his endorsement of Obama? Obama’s political plans and ideology are 180 degrees from National Review’s outlook. Why on earth should they not get him go? Do you think The Nation would continue to publish a columnist who endorsed McCain? Why should they?

Howard Kurtz: Without adopting your “common wisdom,” I’d just say: What’s wrong with a little intellectual debate in National Review, or any other opinion magazine? Does everyone have to march in lockstep? Buckley told me on Reliable Sources yesterday that his father would have devoted six pages of NR to voices denouncing him for embracing Obama, and it would have been good journalism. For the record, Buckley offered to drop the column because of the negative reaction, which he said included a donor vowing not to give the magazine any more money as long as he was associated with it. The resignation was quickly accepted.

Arlington, Va.: How can papers like the New York Times or the Washington Post claim to have a firewall between the newspaper and editorial board when the Chairman and head editor sit in on important editorials like endorsing a president. Also these papers have never endorsed a republican for president (at least in the last couple of decades). There is always an excuse as to why the democrat is a better candidate in their mind, but at some point the facts speak for themselves. The people running these organizations support liberal candidates.

Howard Kurtz: I’m afraid you have little conception of how newspapers work. The “head editor” – the person who runs the newsroom – has absolutely, positively nothing to do with the editorial page or any candidate endorsements. The publisher does, which is fine, because the publisher is not involved in day-to-day newsroom decisions about coverage. The Post’s editorial page, by the way, does not only take the Democratic side of political battles, as underscored by its strong support for the invasion of Iraq. And in 1988 the editorial page made no endorsement rather than support Michael Dukakis for president. The Chicago Tribune, meanwhile, has just endorsed the first Democratic presidential candidate in its history.

Florissant Valley, Mo.: A pleasure to chat with “Reliable” Howard! here’s a question that’s been bothering me. It was amazing how quickly Joe the Plumber got on national news. Why has there been no comparable effort by our supposedly balanced media to contact and interview William Ayres? You would think that at least the Washington Times or Chicago Tribune would have sought him out. It does make you wonder whether the Obama campaign has him under wraps. What’s the story? Thanks

Howard Kurtz: William Ayers has repeatedly refused to do interviews for the past year, since his association with Obama became known. He could talk to the Chicago Tribune; he could hold a news conference and everyone would cover it. But he has chosen not to, and there’s not a shred of evidence the Obama campaign has had anything to do with that. Joe the Plumber, by contrast, has been happy to do interviews with Katie Couric, Diane Sawyer and Mike Huckabee (for his new Fox show), and held a news conference outside his home. So Joe has not exactly shied away from the limelight.

Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet The Press: Former Secretary of State Gen. Colin Powell (Ret.), NBC’s political director Chuck Todd, David Brooks of the New York Times, Jon Meacham of Newsweek magazine, Andrea Mitchell of NBC News, and Joe Scarborough of MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

  • Face the Nation: Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine (D), Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL), former Rep. Rob Portman (R-OH), Missouri Gov. Matt Blunt and The Washington Post’s Dan Balz.
  • This Week: Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, Thomas Friedman of The New York Times, David Gergen of Harvard University, ABC News political consultant Donna Brazile, and ABC News’ George Will.

  • Fox News Sunday: Senator John McCain, (R-AZ), Republican Presidential Nominee and a panel with Brit Hume, Fox News Washington Managing Editor, Mara Liasson, National Public Radio & Fox News, Bill Kristol, Weekly Standard & Fox News and Juan Williams, National Public Radio & Fox News

  • Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Karen Finney, Democratic National Committee Communications Director, Cyrus Krohn, Director of the Republican National Committee’s E-campaign, David Drucker, Roll Call and Emily Heil, Roll Call

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Writer Christopher Buckley and Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine (D)

  • Inside Washington: NPR’s Nina Totenberg, Washington Post’s Colbert King, Newsweek’s Evan Thomas and syndicated columnists Charles Krauthammer and Mark Shields.

  • Chris Matthews Show: Atlantic’s Andrew Sullivan, BBC’s Katty Kay, NBC DC bureau chief Mark Whitaker and Washington Post Writers Group’s Kathleen Parker.

  • Reliable Sources: CNN’s Gloria Borger, Time’s Mark Halperin, AP’s Beth Fouhy, writer Christopher Buckley, Washington Times’ Tara Wall, HuffingtonPost.com’s Rachel Sklar and CBS’ Lara Logan.

  • GPS: New York Times’ Paul Krugman, Financial Times’ Martin Wolf, New York Times’ Joe Nocera, Columbia Business School Dean Glenn Hubbard and Rania Al Abdullah, Queen of Jordan.

  • This is America with Dennis Wholey: Peggy Noonan of the Wall Street Journal, author of “Patriotic Grace”

  • Morning Reading List, 10.16.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

    We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

    Read more

    Morning Reading List, 10.15.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington.

    Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

    We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

    Read more

    Buckley Explains His National Review Departure

    Yesterday, Christopher Buckley wrote on The Daily Beast that he was leaving his father’s magazine, The National Review. Rich Lowry wrote on NRO’s “The Corner“: “We continue to have the highest regard for Chris’s talent and wit, and extend to him warmest regards and understanding.”

    He appeared on “Hardball” last night to explain further:

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