TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Clark Hoyt’

Morning Reading List, 10.22.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 10.13.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 09.23.08

0921 030.JPG

Good morning Washington. Do you know what grocery store this is? (Hint: It’s in Rep. Bilbray‘s district). Email us if you do. (And, after the jump, find out just who that young journo was that we posted yesterday…and who guessed it correctly).

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 09.09.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Yes We Can, But We Don’t Know Why

In her weekly ombud column for the Washington Post, Deborah Howell says that her paper covers (and more prominently features) the Obama campaign far more than it does the McCain campaign.

But as the always astute Jay Rosen points out: Howell never gets around to figuring out why.

AND: See Clark Hoyt‘s ombud column for the NY Times here.

Morning Reading List, 07.21.08

july17 011.JPG
Good morning Washington.
What PR flak didn’t have much luck with the above chair last week? Let us know.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 04.15.08

newseumetc 079.JPG

Happy Tax Day Washington. Playbook tells us that “Patrick Henry, Ed’s son, is 7.” Here’s your TV coverage of the Pope’s visit. Here’s the full text of Sen. John McCain’s remarks to the AP annual meeting yesterday. Sen. Hillary Clinton speaks today. And be sure to check out TVNewser’s ongoing coverage of the 2008 NAB-RTNDA conference in Las Vegas.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • You think Obama’s bitter comment was totally overblown.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because I just had a great job interview at a paper that has an actual functioning newsroom, with good editors who get to the root of the community’s problems. So, why am I angry? They can’t afford to pay me as much as the crappy paper I’m working at now. Damn IT!”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported on Saturday, “Caroline H. Little stepped down yesterday as chief executive and publisher of Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive (WPNI), the company announced.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe reports, “The Internet is up, the newspaper business is down, so no one would expect the top people at the Washington Post Company to be pulling down tens of millions of dollars a year like their counterparts in finance and entertainment. But they’re not suffering. According to 2007 filings, here are paychecks for the three best-paid Posties and their boss.”

  • Bernstein: what makes good journalism

  • British Journalist for CBS Freed in Iraqi Army Raid

  • My Wall Street Journal Editor: WSJ Officials ‘Pretty Thin-Skinned‘”

  • After 18 years as founding editor of ForbesLife, Christopher Buckley has decided to move into the role of editor at large in order to focus more on his writing.”

  • US military to free AP photographer

  • Writers Vs. Editors: A Battle for the Ages

  • The AP reports, “As newspaper publishers build up their online operations and struggle through an advertising slump, one group is worried about being left behind — the folks who make printing presses and other equipment used to make newspapers.”

  • Time for New Blood in Newspaper Boardrooms: A Slate

  • E&P reports, “U.S. daily newspapers shrank their newsrooms by 2,400 journalists in the past year, a 4.4% workforce decrease that’s the biggest year-over-year cut in ranks since the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) began conducting its annual census 30 years ago.”

  • A Second Opinion of David Brooks

  • Romenesko has a memo from the Post’s Frank Ahrens: “After our big Pulitzer win on Monday, there was some melancholy around the newsroom along the lines of, ‘Oh, this will be the last year this kind of thing will happen.’ I said just the opposite. I bet the Big Three — us, the Times and the Journal — will most likely increase our dominance of the Pulitzers in coming years. Why? Because it’s the mid-sized papers that have been/will be so hard-hit by cuts they will no longer be able to produce Pulitzer-caliber journalism.” And, Los Angeles Times’ Peter Spiegel responds: “Frank Ahrens is an old friend of mine, so I hate to disagree with him in public, but I feel the need to defend my employer’s honor. I’m not sure where he gets the idea that the Washington Post, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are ‘the big three’ of American newspaper journalism.”

  • The Editors Weblog reports, “San Jose Mercury News designer Martin Gee has posted a photo documentary of the effects of several rounds of layoffs and buyouts in his California newsroom.”

  • Washington Post’s Dan Steinberg reports, “TK Continues to Win Argument Against Nobody”

  • Daily Campello Art News reports, “Norfolk newspaper The Virginian-Pilot sponsors an annual Student Gallery competition hosted at the Chrysler Museum of Art. The top awards were announced a couple of weeks ago at the Chrysler Museum of Art, where works by the contest’s 62 finalists are on display. Erin Ayres ‘Unveiled Tokens of Lonely and Deserted Past,’ was among two works that earned her the $1,000 first-place award. Now the controversy part… Teresa Annas, art critic for the same newspaper courageously writes that: This year’s top winners resulted from a third round of judging. The first two jurors selected nude artworks for first place. Those judges were Aaron De Groft, director of the Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, and Scott Howe, director of education and public programs at the Chrysler Museum. The Virginian-Pilot, the contest’s main sponsor, declined to honor those choices.”

  • Business Week reports, “Who Rupert Murdoch Had On Speed Dial. … Among a list understandably studded with News Corp executives and operating heads, it’s interesting to find New York Post editor (and longtime Murdoch confidant) Col Allan.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Jack F. Patterson, a hard-nosed newspaper executive who guided The Washington Post to unprecedented circulation growth from the 1950s to the 1980s and who mentored generations of the paper’s top administrators, died April 9 of melanoma at his home in Bethesda. He was 93.”

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt explores “The Blur Between Analysis and Opinion”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell asks, “The Washington Post was awash in Pulitzer Prizes last week — six of them, the most ever for The Post. In the world of newspaper journalism, Pulitzers are the pinnacle. But the prizes are awarded by journalists to journalists. Do they mean anything to readers, especially in this perilous time of newspaper contraction?”

  • Ben Pershing’s Player of the Week is Sen. Robert Byrd. “And, at 90 years old and in increasingly poor health, he is the chairman of one of the most important committees in Congress. The headline news on Capitol Hill this week was about Iraq, housing and the Colombia free trade agreement. But below the surface, a crucial subplot was unfolding in the Senate, as Byrd’s Democratic colleagues cautiously began discussing whether he should continue to chair the Appropriations Committee. On Tuesday, about 15 key Senate Democrats discussed at a private meeting whether Byrd would be able to handle the upcoming Iraq supplemental bill, according to a Roll Call story (subscription required). That initial media report sparked a flurry of subsequent and sometimes contradictory stories in the Capitol Hill press. The Politico got several Senate Democrats saying — publicly, at least — that they support Byrd. Roll Call came back with a report that Byrd was calling colleagues in hopes of saving his job. The Hill newspaper said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) was angling for Byrd’s post, though Leahy denied it. … What’s really going on here? Why is there so much confusion on the subject? There are two primary reasons: Senate collegiality and media skittishness.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • Obama doesn’t commit to N.C. debate

  • Debating the Debate Usage Guidelines

  • A release announced, “WTTG FOX 5 has been awarded four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards by the Radio-Television News Directors Association, including ‘Overall Excellence,’ announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. FOX 5 News also received awards in the ‘Best Newscast,’ ‘Investigative Reporting’ and ‘Videography’ categories.”

  • Ailes to B&C Hall of Fame

  • Newsweek asks, “Can news anchors like Katie Couric survive?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Indecency cases stuck in legal limbo at FCC”

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “The 2008 Media Research Center’s DisHonors Awards took place last night in Washington, D.C. and MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was (dis)honored with the ‘Quote Of The Year Award.’”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “CNN’s Wolf Blitzer isn’t just a newsman. He’s also a Washington sports nut, a regular at George Washington University men’s basketball games, a midcourt season ticket holder for the Washington Wizards, and big fan of the new Nationals baseball team. Lately, he’s tied both passions together, giving a Wizards pregame analysis from CNN’s Situation Room for the Verizon Center’s JumboTron. Now, he has his eyes on the Nats, whose new stadium boasts the biggest outfield TV ever. ‘I’d do it for the Nationals, too, but only if they want me,’ he tells us. ‘That’s a really big scoreboard.’”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Blogger Is Surprised by Uproar Over Obama Story, but Not Bitter

  • CJR’s Curtis Brainard reports, “A strange thing happened Tuesday. The New Republic had just launched a new ‘Environment & Energy’ blog on Sunday, and it had already hit a bump in the road. Just below the blog’s masthead was a small, green logo with the words, ‘Powered by BP.’ Within a day of the launch, TNR readers had begun to complain about irony of an oil giant (even one that has been trying to burnish its green credential for years) ‘powering’ (most assumed sponsoring) a blog about issues such as climate change and the development of renewable fuels. Just as I was reading the blog’s inaugural posts and its readers’ comments I refreshed the page and, lo and behold, the controversial BP logo had disappeared.”

  • The AP reports, “As people turn increasingly to the Internet for their news, there is concern whether they are learning enough about what goes on in their communities. With ‘the thinning down of newspapers and local television in America, there is measurably less local, civic information available,’ said Alberto Ibarguen, president and chief executive of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. ‘So what are the consequences of that?’ The foundation and the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, hope to find out.”

  • AdAge.com allows you to “Test Your Knowledge of Budget-Conscious News Ops and More in Media Guy’s Media-Studies Quiz”

  • PaidContent.org reports, “Salon Media, the parent of Salon.com, has raised $1 million in equity financing by selling its stock, just in time as its money was running out, again. The note, which it issued on April 4, 2008, may be convertible at a future date into common stock of the company at a conversion price equal of $1.68, it said in an SEC filing. They bear interest at the rate of 7.5 percent per annum, payable semi-annually, in cash or in kind, and mature on March 31, 2012, the filing states. It will use the funds raised for working capital and other general corporate purposes, the company said.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • BIG MAGAZINE TITLES SEE AD PAGES DWINDLE DOWN IN Q1

  • toohotfortnr writes, “On Monday, THFTNR goes out of business and Attackerman rises to take its place. That means I have a limited amount of time to take this blog back to its essence: the beef with TNR. And I have one score in particular that I badly need to settle. The story of Snitching Ryan Lizza.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Washington City Paper reports, “The health problems that sidelined WTOP’s Mark Plotkin for more than three months have apparently been resolved–the man was back in the chair this morning on the Politics Program in fine old form”

    Top of post

    NEWS NOTES

  • Gridskipper takes a look at The Newseum.

  • Don’t forget, the NLGJA-DC Happy Hour is Thursday, April 17 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hotel Helix Lounge at 1430 Rhode Island Ave., N.W.

  • Washington Social Diary reports, “There are small parties and there are big parties, and there are parties that are huge. Washington’s newest monumental addition, the Newseum, gave itself an opening party the other night that was huge — so many (one count had it at 1800) that they had to stand in line. Men in black tie, women in evening dresses, getting checked off the guest list.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • St. Mary’s Today is looking for a News Desk/Reporter Person.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.25.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington. It’s Emily Lawrimore’s birthday (Hat Tip: Playbook), the 2008 Dart Award Winners have been announced, Dana Priest and Anne Hull have won yet another award, yesterday was Monica Lewinsky’s 34th birthday and on this day in 1634, the first colonists to Maryland found the settlement of St. Mary’s (Hat Tip: MicCheckRadio).

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • We asked how your NCAA tourney bracket is doing and you said, “What bracket?”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Mary Shaffrey of The Hill and Winston-Salem Journal fame is the new communications director at BIPAC.

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Katie Levinson has joined Edelman as senior vice president and political director in its New York Public Affairs practice. Levinson’s background includes serving as communications director and spokeswoman for the RNC, Bush-Cheney ’04, President Bush, Governor Schwarzenegger’s reelection and Mayor Giuliani’s presidential campaign.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt asks, “So Much Sex, but What’s Fit to Print?”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Five Reasons Why Having a ‘Public Editor’ at the Times and Other Papers No Longer Makes Much Sense”

  • The New York Times’ David Carr reports, “Newspapers’ New Owners Turn Grim”

  • This “Washington Post Moment Of Zen” is brought to you by His Extreme-ness.

  • Variety reports, “Tribune owner hopes to revive embattled Times”

  • One reader wonders why this AP story never mentions Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick’s party (Democrat).

  • The Huffington Post asks, “Did Only Two Papers Feature 4,000 Iraq Deaths Across Their Front Pages?”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “For days, the Obama campaign refused to confirm where the senator and his family were heading on a short Easter vacation, even as rumors spread among the press corps that they were bound for the Virgin Islands. So that presented a conundrum for news organizations: Should they send a correspondent on the — presumably enjoyable — assignment to the Caribbean, to investigate the white sand beaches and clear blue waters? As it turns out, CNN was the lone cable network to play a game of ‘Where in the World is Barack Obama?’ Chris Welch, an off-air producer covering the Obama campaign since the Iowa caucuses, headed out to the islands.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • TVNewser has a round-up of cable news coverage in “The 2008 Cable Watch”

  • Jake Tapper: ABC’s Man of the Hours

  • Politico: “Despite criticism, Fox’s Wallace keeps ‘Obama Watch’ ticking

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Fox Hosts Claim Friday’s Walk-Off Was A Joke”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports,Chris Wallace took some of his Fox colleagues to task, claiming that they took Senator Barack Obama’s comments about race out of context.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “One of the mysteries of television is why PBS’ Tavis Smiley continues to fly below the radar. He has an easy charm and a keen curiosity, and deserves to be better known.”

  • Variety reports, “While preparing to take Fox Television to the Supreme Court over a handful of expletives, the Federal Communications Commission let expire a separate indecency fine against the network for airing a movie with multiple repetitions of one of the same expletives. The FCC blamed a recent federal appeals court decision, saying it has created confusion over how the agency can enforce its indecency rules.”

  • The Kalb Report has the video of “Covering the World: A Conversation with Christiane Amanpour

  • New York Times reports,Bob Schieffer, right, the host of the CBS News Sunday morning program ‘Face the Nation’ since 1982, has agreed to postpone his planned retirement. ‘Yes, I’m going to remain with the show after the inauguration,’ Mr. Schieffer, 71, said Friday.”

  • A GWU release announced, “The George Washington University’s Prime Movers Program recently received a gift of $1,500 from the Washington, D.C.-area chapter of the Radio-Television News Directors Association to help purchase broadcast equipment and train students producing local high school radio and television programs. The Prime Movers Program is a partnership between Washington-area news media and local high schools in collaboration with GW’s School of Media and Public Affairs. Its goal is to provide journalism education and hands-on training in minority and diverse high schools.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Nielsen Online Names Top 30 News Sites

  • Why are Web and Print STILL So Separate?”

  • A release announced, “Government Executive Media Group, a division of Atlantic Media Company, today launched NextGov, an interactive online platform serving the complete federal technology community. Breaking the traditional media model of one-way reporting by journalists toward readers, NextGov is designed to foster a multilayered dialogue between and among federal IT officials, program managers, private sector officials and outside observers about building the high-performance, results-driven federal agencies of the future. NextGov.com is designed specifically to support the needs of federal IT decision-makers, delivering three essential components to the decision-making process.”

  • All Things Digital’s Kara Swisher reports, “In February, for the first time ever, Arianna Huffington’s liberal political mega-blog and news site, the Huffington Post, has apparently surpassed the longtime mighty blog leader, Matt Drudge of the conservative/populist-leaning Drudge Report, according to recent traffic data reports from both comScore (SCOR) and Nielsen Online.”

  • Machinist reports, “The Wall Street Journal’s Web site is already (secretly) free”

  • The AP reports, “Details on Some of the Online Ad Networks Formed by Traditional Media Companies.”

  • BeetTV reports, “The Washington Post, long an innovator in expanding its online presence, has created a popular application on Facebook with some 350,000 downloads, Jim Brady, Executive Editor of the washingtonpost.com tells Beet.TV. The application is a kind of political badge which members put on their Facebook pages, showing their political leanings from liberal to conservative.”

  • Billboard reports, “Search for an artist on any of the popular search engines, and the top three results are practically guaranteed: the artist’s official Web site, Wikipedia entry and MySpace page — often in that order. But while artists and their handlers devote massive attention to the Web site and MySpace, the Wikipedia page is often overlooked. Recent data suggests they may want to reconsider their priorities.”

  • The AP reports, “Traditional media companies trying to stem the flow of advertising dollars to Google and other large Internet companies are increasingly building ad networks of their own, anchored by their brands. The latest, Forbes Inc., announced Monday that it will start selling ads this spring for about 400 financial blogs. In recent months, Conde Nast, Viacom Inc., CBS Corp. and other major media companies also have unveiled topic-specific ad networks to lure advertisers that want to buy more ads than any single site can sell.”

  • Fortune reports, “As the United States slips into recession, advertising spending is set to fall — spelling trouble for traditional media companies already battered by Internet upstarts.”

  • Media Daily News reports, “A full-blown recession would probably take a substantial bite out of traditional media, according to a survey of industry analysts and independent researchers. But digital media will benefit from these draw-downs as financially strapped marketing executives shift dollars online, seeking more transparent measures of ROI. In many cases, a recession would simply accelerate a long-term trend that is already underway.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • In Washington Post Magazine, Gene Weingarten writes, “One man with more courage than brains sacrifices himself on the altar of punditry, and, in so doing, fails to redeem us all”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “During Sunday’s ‘This Week With George Stephanopoulos’ roundtable on Barack Obama and Jeremiah Wright, Clarie Shipman offered some thoughts. Then came her husband, Jay Carney. He said, ‘I will agree with my wife.’ Good move. Probably smart to maintain peace in that household. But hardly unique for Jay Carney.”

  • CNet News.com has a Q&A with Wired founder John Battelle talking “blog roll-ups, Google, and Federated Media’s future”

  • Monocle: Mr. Magazine’s Notable International Launch of the Year + An interview with Tyler Brule

  • MinOnline reports, “min has put together a one-day program that’s all about the magazine brand and its relationship with new media, from improving your Web play to making the right call on mobile opportunities; from appealing to clients who want to see more than a banner/print bundle to engaging your customers with meaningful content offerings. Don’t miss out on the publishing event of the year! Go to www.minday2008.com for registration and Early Bird Rate details”

  • The New Yorker’s Eric Alterman chronicles “The death and life of the American newspaper.”

  • New York Daily News reports, “Gore Vidal is wasting no time sticking knives in the corpse of his old foe William F. Buckley Jr. In an attack brutal even by Vidal standards, Gore writes on TruthDig.com that the National Review founder was ‘a hysterical queen’ and ‘a world-class American liar. … Buckley was often drunk and out of control.’ Vidal blames the ‘tired hacks’ at Newsweek for letting Buckley’s ‘creepy,’ ‘brain-dead’ son, Christopher, talk them into a reverential cover story on his father. Vidal concludes, ‘RIP WFB — in hell.’ We asked Christopher and Newsweek if they’d care to fire back. They declined.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “With BlogTalkRadio, the Commentary Universe Expands”

  • Washington Post reports, “As the audience for AM and FM radio declines, start-up entrepreneurs and giant media companies alike search for the ‘next radio’ — a way to make money by helping listeners discover new music. Online music providers such as Pandora, Imeem and Last.fm provide an early glance at that next chapter in radio history.”

    Top of post

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer/Online Producer.

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is looking for a Desk Assistant.

  • The CATO Institute is looking for a Director, Communications.

  • The Hill Newspaper is looking for an Advertising Executive.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for a Senior Associate.

  • Roll Call TV is looking for an Intern.

  • AARP is looking for a Senior Manager, Media Relations.

  • Politico is looking for a National Account Executive.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • The Story With “The Story”

    (alternate headline: “Bill Keller’s day is gonna suck“)

    Yeah, so have you heard about this New York Times McCain story?

    Initial assessments and punditry do not support the New York Times’ decision to run the piece.

    McCain says it’s not true. Bob Bennett says the NYTimes has “lowered its standards” and calls the piece “a hit job.” Pat Buchanan called it a “weasley headline” on “Morning Joe.” Time’s Richard Stengel says he never would have run it. Tim Russert said that the more you read it, the softer the article seems. Rich Lowry says “The Times doesn’t have the goods—at least from what’s in the story–and shouldn’t have run it.” Mike Allen called it a “famously bland headline.” Joe Scarborough says the NYT has “a lot of questions to answer.” El Rushbo chimes in against the “drive-by media.” Ana Marie Cox (who likes paper dolls) gets a reaction from the McCain camp. Sam Stein asks, “Why Did The NYT Hold McCain-Lobbyist Story?” Marc Cooper says, “John McCain Owes The New York Times a Thank You Card.” Drudge had a field day with it. The McCain people clearly don’t like it:

      “It is a shame that the New York Times has lowered its standards to engage in a hit and run smear campaign,” said communications director Jill Hazelbaker, in a prepared statement sent about an hour after the Times posted their story online.

    TNR (which was rumored to have forced the NYT’s hand on the story) thinks that “a lot of stuff was edited out.” The mag is working on its own story:

      The McCain campaign is apparently blaming TNR for forcing the Times’ hand on this story. We can’t yet confirm that. But we can say this: TNR correspondent Gabe Sherman is working on a piece about the Times’ foot-dragging on the McCain story, and the back-and-forth within the paper about whether to publish it. Gabe’s story will be online tomorrow.

    Tucker’s having lunch with Frank Foer today so perhaps he can get the inside scoop.

    Leading the charge against the piece (based on both today’s “Today” show and “Morning Joe”) is NBC/MNSBC. And, wait: Aren’t they also partners with the NYT?

    Anne Applebaum says: “Thanks to lack of evidence, the article reads not like an expose but like an elaborate and extended piece of insinuation.

    Clark Hoyt! Where are you?!?

    And in case you were wondering…the reporters: Jim Rutenberg, Marilyn Thompson, David Kilpatrick and Stephen Labaton.

    TV coverage notes from TVNewser

    Morning Reading List, 02.19.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • The Oscars are your favorite awards show.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of the Society for Science & the Public, has named Jonathan Oleisky its new associate publisher.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Readers are super-sensitive to any perceived slight to their favorite candidate — from Page 1 display to photos to the details of graphics. And they want guidance from The Post in issues coverage and editorial endorsements before they vote. Several readers were unhappy that on last Sunday’s front page, Sen. Barack Obama’s Feb. 9 primary victories were played below a story on the Washington Redskins naming Jim Zorn as head coach.”

  • William McGurn on “Press Corps Quagmire

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Now that pending layoffs at the New York Times and Los Angeles Times have made newsroom cutbacks all but unanimous, some managers eager to maximize the feet on the street at their newspapers are wondering if they really need all those editors.”

  • A release announced, “The International Center for Journalists, the Washington-based nonprofit organization, is seeking nominations for the 2008 Knight International Journalism Awards. The Awards recognize international journalists who demonstrate an extraordinary devotion to the craft by upholding the highest journalistic standards despite overwhelming challenges.”

  • Crains New York reports, “On the heels of a 13% plunge in December’s advertising revenue, The New York Times said last week that it would cut 100 newsroom jobs over the course of this year. The paper isn’t the only suffering media business. Radio ad revenue for the New York marketplace took a slide in January, and television insiders predict a low-single-digit ad revenue drop in the first quarter for the local marketplace. Add magazines to the mix: Some are seeing the bottom fall out of their ad page counts.”

  • “Pundit Police Watch News Talkers

  • Stephen Hunter talks about his heart attack.

  • Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson asks, “Are the news media being beastly to Hillary Clinton? Are political reporters and commentators — as Bill Clinton suggested but didn’t quite come out and say in a radio interview Tuesday — basically in the tank for Barack Obama?” In response, Terence Smith writes, “Gene’s answer: no and no. My view: yes and yes.”

  • The New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “Three articles in The Times last month raised an intriguing question: When does fairness demand that a newspaper walk down the middle in a scientific dispute, and when does responsibility demand that it take sides? It is hardly a new question, and The Times, historically, has been slow to declare victors.”

  • A release announced, “The American Society of Newspaper Editors has selected the winners of its annual awards for distinguished writing and photography.” Among the winners are Anne Hull and Dana Priest, The Washington Post for their stories “exposing the deep and widespread problems at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.”

  • Edward Wasserman, the Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University, writes, “Beneath the somber tales of shrinking revenues and staff cuts is an even more somber reality about the news business: The nearly two-century-old marriage between consumer advertising and journalism is on the rocks.”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “Coverage Adds to Clinton’s Steep Climb”

  • The New Yorker reports, “few days before Senator Barack Obama swept the Democratic primaries in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, people across the country, picking up their favorite newspaper, were greeted with the following headline: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Big Part In Obama’s Young Life. In any event, that’s what some readers thought they read. On second glance, they realized their mistake. The headline actually said this: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Bit Part In Obama’s Young Life. Maybe, though, the mistake wasn’t just the readers’, especially the bleary-eyed among them who hadn’t yet had their morning coffee. After all, it wasn’t exactly news that ‘drugs’ had played a part (and only a ‘bit part’ at that) in the adolescence of the junior senator from Illinois. That particular factoid had been on the public record for more than twelve years. And if it wasn’t news, what was it doing on the front page of the New York Times?”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has acquired $60 million worth of shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. over the past three weeks as part of its push to grow its education business.”

  • Market Watch reports, “A pair of hedge funds seeking representation on the board of directors of New York Times Co. disclosed on Thursday that they have raised their stake in the media company above 10%. Firebrand Partners and Harbinger Capital Partners reported holding 15.1 million New York Times shares, or a 10.54% stake, after a Harbinger fund bought 441,100 Class A shares for $17.62 a share on Tuesday. The funds had previously reported holding 14.25 million shares for a 9.96% stake.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • Do we have too many pundits? Paul Farhi looks into it.

  • A CNN release announced, “This Week in Politics will move to the 6 p.m. (ET) time slot on Saturdays beginning this weekend. The one-hour program, anchored by Tom Foreman, previously aired at 7 p.m. on Saturdays.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Some Shuster Defense on Rival Networks”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “It’s official: The strike drove writers nuts. No, not TV and film writers. Journalists. Fourteen weeks of covering bitter trench warfare between the Writers Guild of America and the studios, and the ink-stained wretches are feeling wretched. It’s not just that covering a complex, polarizing news story for more than three months left them fried. The worst part has been the blowback. And we don’t mean from the studios and networks, either. No, friends, it’s the ugliest kind of warfare: writer on writer.”

  • TVNewser reported this weekend, “This morning on Fox & Friends Weekend, an entirely new group of anchors graced the FNC screen. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris greeted viewers at 7amET. Johnny Dollar has some clips of the trio’s first day.”

  • From Playbook: “ABC’s Ann Compton e-mails that when President Bush landed today in rural Arusha, Tanzania, in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, he was greeted by Masai tribal dancers, hundreds of cheering Africans lining the — and three people, standing apart, waving OBAMA signs. ‘Not certain whether Bush saw them,’ Ann writes. ‘Just bought Mike Allen a ZEBRA — bringing it home on press plane. Really!’”

  • Washington Post reports, “In Washington, politics and the press always manage to inject themselves into the proceedings, even at a music awards show honoring the best and brightest on the local music scene. So at a long-standing music awards ceremony like the Wammies, you pretty much expect that at some point, CBS newsman Bob Schieffer is going to take to the stage. After all, there is no moment more quintessential D.C., more inside-the-Beltway, than the sight of Schieffer — who won a Spotlight Award last night — rocking at the mike with the local band Honky Tonk Confidential, speak-singing with a country-western twang a little ditty called ‘TV Anchorman.’ He also extolled the wonders of the ‘American dream’ — and promised that after the presidential inauguration next year he’ll forswear TV life for a full-time music career.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “ABC newsman Bob Woodruff’s long recovery from a brain injury suffered in an IED attack in 2006 in Iraq is turning a new page. Literally. He tells us that in the upcoming paperback version of his hit book, In an Instant, his kids will write of how they dealt with their father’s injury, coma, and recovery.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington Post reports,Barry Schuler moved to Washington from Silicon Valley to join AOL during its golden days, one of the many top technology professionals the Internet giant recruited to the region. But when the former chief executive left in 2003, he returned to California to become an investor and start a technology company, following other executives who have drifted away from the region. … Departures like Schuler’s are one reason Washington’s technology industry is still struggling to mature a decade after Dulles-based AOL became a magnet for talent.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Media Work Force Sinks to 15-Year Low”

  • The Guardian reports, “Media companies including the BBC, Channel 4, Google, Yahoo and social-networking site Bebo have signed up to a new code of conduct … designed to give parents more information about the suitability for children of audiovisual content available on the internet and mobile phones.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “With recession talk in the air, marketers are scrutinizing their spending. But old, reliable tricks such as counting on coupons to goose sales might not work this time around. Luckily, cheaper options abound in emerging media such as mobile, e-mail and search.”

  • Variety reports, “Amid all the recent headlines about tie-ups and acquisitions involving Yahoo, Microsoft, Google and Facebook, one player continues to look more like a perpetual bridesmaid than bride. Few could dispute that AOL, the onetime buyer of Time Warner, has become a burr under its parent company’s saddle financially. Q4 2007 results released Feb. 6 showed an array of less-than-scintillating numbers. Division revenue slipped below 10% of the conglom’s total for the first quarter since 2000. Fiscal-year operating profit was just 14% of the total. Display ad revenue gained just 3% for the quarter, to $252 million, and paid search rose only 1%.”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “The Right Strengthens its Hold on McCain, the Media Refuse to Notice”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Reed Elsevier, the Anglo-Dutch media group, is drawing up plans to axe more than 1,000 jobs as part of a continuing efficiency drive, The Sunday Telegraph has learned. The company, which owns the LexisNexis information service and the medical journal, The Lancet, is understood to be preparing to cut the jobs over the next couple of years as it centralises functions such as procurement, human resources and IT across the group. Analysts expect the job cuts — the majority of which will take place outside Britain — to contribute to a restructuring that will shed as much as £100m from Reed’s annual costs bill. It is unclear whether the cuts will be acknowledged formally in its annual results announcement on Wednesday.”

  • Kiplinger.com’s Business Resource Center launched a new Politics blog. Check it out here.

  • The Telegraph reports, “AOL, the American internet company, is attempting to piece together a deal with Yahoo! designed to help the Silicon Valley-based search engine evade the clutches of Microsoft, the world’s biggest software group”

  • New York Times reports, “In the middle of a media-saturated political season, Jared Kushner, publisher of The New York Observer, has been quietly nurturing an ambitious political journalism venture. The plan is to pull together 50 Web sites, one for each state, into a political hub called Politicker.com. Each site will serve as an intensely local source for political articles, speculation and scandal, Mr. Kushner said.”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “Illinois Shooting Tragedy Pushes Election Off The Top, Mostly”

  • Chris Cillizza admits, “The Fix is a non-voter — for a few reasons”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Washington Monthly may team up with Common Cause.

  • “In the press, Hillary has been trapped by her own story, whereas Obama has been freed by his,” writes John Heilemann.

  • New York Post reports, “While magazine circulation inched up an average of just 1.1 percent in the second half of 2007, a few magazines with innovative approaches and partnerships managed to beat the odds.”

  • The Feed reports, “Time magazine senior political analyst Mark Halperin joined a small, yet growing club this week, when he issued an apology for saying John Edwards considered Barack Obama ‘kind of a pussy’ on a satellite radio talk show.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • FMQB reports, “Clear Channel Communications released its 2007 and Q4 fiscal results, with the company’s quarterly profit up 51.7 percent. Earnings in the quarter jumped from $211 in 2006 to $320 million in 2007. Revenue was up four percent to $1.84 billion. For the entire year, revenue was up six percent to $6.82 billion. Net income increased by 37 percent to $938.5 million.”

  • Canadian Business reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. spent roughly $1.2 million in 2007 to lobby for approval of its proposed $5 billion acquisition by rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., among other issues. The satellite radio operator spent $580,000 in the second half of 2007 to lobby Congress and the Department of Justice about the pending merger, according to a disclosure form posted online Tuesday by the Senate’s public records office.”

    Top of post

    BOOKS

  • Newsweek asks, “What to make of ‘Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks From the Wild Web’? The new book, edited by Sarah Boxer, the New York Times’s first (now former) ‘Web critic,’ endeavors to compile an anthology of the best posts from the best Web logs. ‘W,’ you might ask, ‘TF?’ To what end this dead-tree blogroll? Is this a sincere attempt to explain the blogging phenomenon-which some estimate is, in its current form, more than 15 years old to off-the-grid grandmas across America? Or is this compilation a cynical ploy to cash in on free content?”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Television Producer-Writer.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for a Financial Services Reporter.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Web Producer and a Web Editor.

  • Summit Business Media is looking for a DC Reporter for Credit Union Times Magazine.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • << PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>