TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Dana Priest’

Morning Reading List: 100 Days

Good morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

It is day 100 covering the Obama administration and week 13 for us. What we know and what we’re reading this Wednesday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | RADIO | ONLINE | MAGAZINES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

AdAge: WSJ is threatening to reclaim its weekday circulation crown from USA Today for the first time since September 1999. If USA Today falls another two percentage points while WSJ holds steady, WSJ will once again claim the largest paid weekday circulation in the U.S.

TV

TVNewser takes a look at life after layoffs for broadcast journos.

ABC’s Brian Ross‘ investigative reporting was questioned in an article on the front page of NYT in yesterday’s paper. TVNewser reports NYT’s reporting was questioned but one of the reporter’s sources. Read on here.

“So, if planes go into buildings, well, don’t blame Barack Obama, blame Dana Priest and the chaos that occurred after that, ’cause that was — when her article came out, from that point forward, this secret CIA program was dead on arrival.” -MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough on Morning Joe yesterday in a discussion about torture. Read in context at Media Matters.

RADIO

Congrats to WAMU’s Diane Rehm, who has again made the cut for “Top 10 Most Powerful Programs On Public Radio,” according to the fall 2008 study by Audience Research Analysis.

AP: Clear Channel Communications Inc., the largest owner of U.S. radio stations, said yesterday it is cutting 590 jobs, including some on-air personalities, in its second round of mass layoffs this year amid pressure from the recession and evaporating advertising budgets.

ONLINE

Vanity Fair studies media Darwinism- which sites will survive? Gives an outlook for Politico, Slate, Drudge, even PerezHilton.

MAGAZINES

Are there more cuts ahead at Conde Nast?

WEST WING REPORTAGE

Politico reports the WH press office blasted out an email yesterday “specifically to reporters that the White House considers focusing mainly on the negative when it comes to ethics issues” under the subject “Fair and/ or Balanced.”

NEWS NOTES

Senators Ted Kennedy and John Kerry, and most of the Massachusetts delegation, have sent letters of support for the Boston Globe to NYT’s Arthur Sulzberger.

B&C: SCOTUS has backed the government’s power to regulate the broadcast of so-called “fleeting expletives” on live television. The decision Tuesday reverses and remands a lower court ruling that the FCC did not justify its change in policy on fleeting expletives.

NYT: The Justice Department has begun an inquiry into the antitrust implications of Google’s settlement with authors and publishers over its Google Book Search service. The inquiry does not necessarily mean that the department will oppose the settlement.

From Reliable Source: “The only thing I have against her is that she threatens to surpass me in attracting the left’s hatred.” -Ann Coulter extolling Sarah Palin in the “Time 100″ ranking of the world’s most influential people, due out next week.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro

JOBS after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 01.15.09

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Priest To Anchor

We told you earlier about the Washington Post’s coverage plans for Election Night.

Now, we’ve learned that Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Dana Priest will anchor washingtonpost.com’s live online video coverage. This is her first time doing so.

UPDATE: Lois Romano will also assume co-anchor duties alongside Priest.

Morning Reading List, 09.15.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Milbank on BROW-klee

Capturetwodanas.JPG

From a washingtonpost.com chat with Dana Milbank and Dana Priest:

Philadelphia: What is the correct pronunciation of the name “Dana”?

Dana Milbank: “BROW-klee.”

Dana Priest: What he is refering to our newly named executive editor, Marcus Brauchlis, who comes on board Sept. 8.

Dana Milbank: Apparently a lot of people think it’s funny that our new executive editor’s surname sounds like the vegetable broccoli.

I wish to say for the record that I find this absolutely radicchio. I have been peppered with this nonsense endlessly, and I carrot allow this to leek out any further. Lettuce squash this silliness and never allow it to sprout again.

Morning Reading List, 04.09.08

4345057.jpg
Good morning Washington. It’s Joe Scarborough’s birthday! Also: Hugh Hefner and Jenna Jameson (why are we not surprised they share a day…thanks MicCheck). Also, on this day in 1865, Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you have broken a bone.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “My best friend was laid off, and she was the smartest person there. There was no good reason. It was ‘budgetary.’ I have no more faith in this industry.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The slow-drip continues…more WHCA news.

  • Pulitzer Day: Keller Brings Up ASME’s, Polks; WaPo Rager

  • Hillary Clinton (55%) finished narrowly behind Barack Obama (56%) in the race for press exposure last week. But a Clinton-centric narrative was the focus of the campaign coverage for March 31-April 6, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study.”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper readers agree with editors on the basics of what makes good journalism, but they are more apt to want looser rules for online conversations, a new study on news credibility has found.”

  • The Cornell Daily Sun reports, “Yesterday afternoon, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Nicholas D. Kristof delivered a lecture on the current human rights violations in Sudan and China’s controversial involvement in the continuation of the civil conflict. The New York Times columnist has visited the war-torn region of Darfur in Sudan on several occasions and urges the international community — especially Americans — to focus their attention on providing more aid, including political relief, in hope of ending the genocide.”

  • CJR’s Dean Starkman writes, “The big winner in yesterday’s Pulitzers? The investigation. Sure, The Washington Post won six. But newspapering’s highest—and most important—form won at least that many. Not only did our brothers and sisters upstairs on the Pulitzer Board award two investigative prizes, to Walt Bogdanich and Jake Hooker of The New York Times and to the Chicago Tribune staff for work on tainted medicine and consumer goods, an investigative thread ran through most of the major awards—including the Public Service award, given to The Washington Post staff for the work of Dana Priest, Anne Hull, and photographer Michel du Cille.”

  • Plain Dealer Columnist Ted Diadiun writes, “‘There is no patent on a good idea,’ an editor friend used to say. The pithy comment essentially summed up the source of most good newspaper stories: Other people.”

  • Dave Barry writes, “I’ve had many entertaining arguments with Gene on a wide range of issues, including which of us has a bigger oosik. (An oosik is the bone from the penis of a walrus. Gene and I each own one.) We’ve both won some arguments and lost some; neither of us, to my recollection, has ever been gracious about it. One of the running jokes that developed between us is that at some point in the argument, usually early, I will remind Gene that I have won a Pulitzer Prize, and he has not. I have used this particular argument — this is a conservative estimate — 119 million times. And Gene has never had a good answer for it. Until today. I am very pleased to report that Mr. Gene Weingarten has won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. Gene, congratulations on an honor that is well-deserved and overdue. I’m thrilled for you, and genuinely happy that I can never use that particular argument against you again.”

  • Check out yesterday’s chat with Pulitzer Prize-winner Gene Weingarten.

  • E&P’s Joe Strupp reports, “Inside Word at Pulitzer Announcement: Entries Down, But Online Up.” Also, E&P has a round-up of winners and their stories, including Steven Pearlstein, Gene Weingarten, Amy Harmon, David Umhoefer, The Chicago Tribune editors and Michael Ramirez.

  • AJR’s John Morton writes, “Shortsighted cutbacks pose a serious threat to the future of newspapers.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer says, “Strategy Room Becomes Part of FNC Weekend.”

  • An ABC release announced, “‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ placed 1st among key demo viewers last week, tying NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ in the demo rating and share; both broadcasts averaged a 2.1/8 among Adults 25-54. Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ averaged 7.98 million, placing second. Compared to a year ago, ‘World News’ posted gains among key demo viewers, increasing 6%. Additionally, for the twelfth time in thirteen weeks, the ABC News broadcast won among Women 25-54, averaging a 2.4/9.’”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 31, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 8.267 million total viewers”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Disney’s Bob Iger Explains Why ABC Passed On CNN Outsourcing, Why Media Concentration Is ‘A Joke’”

  • Silver Spring-based Discovery unveiled to advertisers yesterday its celebrity-encrusted plans for the new cable network Planet Green — the Prius of programming. Planet Green rises like the phoenix from the ashes of Discovery Home at 6 p.m. on June 4.

  • Small cable firms protest

  • CBS layoffs signal a financial squeeze on TV stations

  • DCTRV reports, “NBC Washington started handing out Sony HD cameras to all network field crews on Thursday, 4/3. NBC currently has four HD edit suits available and plans on upgrading the microwave system to full HD by the end of the summer.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reuters reports, “Viral sensation Obama Girl and satirical political corruption fighters Swift Kids for Truth along with Web sites for the New York Times and National Public Radio (NPR) have been nominated for Webby awards.”

  • Britannica Blog reports, “We’ll launch our blog forum on ‘Newspapers & the Net’ with an excerpt from Nick’s book. Throughout this forum assorted writers, journalists, bloggers, and media scholars will discuss and debate the state of newspapers in the digital age. Some of the participants will address Nick’s ideas directly, and others will talk generally about the impact of new media on traditional avenues of publishing. Lively debate will occur along the way, and we welcome your input, your comments and perspectives, and encourage your participation in these discussions.”

  • PostGlobal launched a blog called “Pomfret’s China“. “It will be
    written by Outlook Editor of The Washington Post John Pomfret and will cover the political, economic, and cultural elements playing into China’s rise as a world power.” Also coming to washingtonpost.com is “Intel Dump” by Phillip Carter. His blog will explore issues of national security and intelligence relating to American diplomatic, military and economic power.”

  • “C-SPAN wants to know, ‘What issue in this election is most important to you, and why?’ Shoot a short video response to this question and post it on our YouTube page! Now through the eve of the Pennsylvania primaries, YouTube users and C-SPAN viewers can upload their video to the YouTube/C-SPAN webpage.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Atlantic Media, owner of The Atlantic and National Journal, is close to selling its controlling stake in 02138 magazine to Sandow Media, WWD has learned. A spokesman for Sandow confirmed that the deal was in its final stages, but said it had not closed.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Former MSNBC VP Tammy Haddad, now president of Haddad Media, has been named to the Folio: 40. An annual list of magazine industry ‘influencers and innovators.’ Haddad is honored for showing ‘the magazine world that producing compelling video content doesn’t have to be an expensive proposition.’ Hadded is working with Newsweek on their video ventures.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio will broadcast from the Newseum during the grand opening festivities on Friday, 4/11. XM’s presidential election channel (XM-130) will be live from the new newsgathering museum on Capitol Hill from 11 AM to 4 PM. Also, DCRTV hears that former WMALer Chris Core, who now works for the POTUS channel, will emcee the opening from 7 AM to 9 AM Friday.”

    Top of post

    NEWS NOTES

  • Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam writes, “Samantha Power didn’t get the memo! Nor, apparently, did retired John F. Kennedy School of Government — sorry, Harvard Kennedy School — professor Francis Bator. Both have been using the K-School’s ‘old’ name in communications of late. The Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, whose ‘discussion papers’ stare up at me from the bottom of my wastebasket, is still using the no-longer operative moniker, ‘John F. Kennedy School . . . etc., etc.’”

    Top of post

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • The Washington Social Diary reports, “True to its nature, in this town the power lunch spots get ranked in hierarchical order. The top is the top, meaning the leading power dining room would be the White House ‘Mess.’ The name belies its quiet authority, sitting as it does in the West Wing basement, under the Oval Office, and across the hall from the ‘Sit Room.’”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for a Staff Reporter.

  • Bristol Herald Courier is looking for a Sports Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is seeking a Copy Editor, Health Line Group.

  • Patuxent Publishing Co. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • PBS Newshour is looking for a Desk Assistant.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Pulitzers Announced…WaPo Cleans Up

    Where the WaPo took home the gold:

    Public Service:

      Awarded to The Washington Post for the work of Dana Priest, Anne Hull and photographer Michel du Cille in exposing mistreatment of wounded veterans at Walter Reed Hospital, evoking a national outcry and producing reforms by federal officials.

    Breaking News Reporting:

      Awarded to The Washington Post Staff for its exceptional, multi-faceted coverage of the deadly shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, telling the developing story in print and online.

    National Reporting:

      Awarded to Jo Becker and Barton Gellman of The Washington Post for their lucid exploration of Vice President Dick Cheney and his powerful yet sometimes disguised influence on national policy.

    International reporting:

      Awarded to Steve Fainaru of The Washington Post for his heavily reported series on private security contractors in Iraq that operate outside most of the laws governing American forces.

    Feature Writing:

      Awarded to Gene Weingarten of The Washington Post for his chronicling of a world-class violinist who, as an experiment, played beautiful music in a subway station filled with unheeding commuters.

    Commentary:

      Awarded to Steven Pearlstein of The Washington Post for his insightful columns that explore the nation’s complex economic ills with masterful clarity.

    (Oh, and Bob Dylan won a Pulitzer, too)

    As E&P notes, this is the second biggest sweep by a single paper ever (the NYT took home seven in 2002, thanks to its Sept. 11 coverage).

    And: Does this silence some of the anti-Len Downie chatter (accurate or not) we’ve been hearing recently?

    Congrats to all.

    Morning Reading List, 03.06.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington. It’s Alan Greenspan’s birthday and, on this day in 1981, Walter Cronkite signed off from CBS.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think John King is hotter than Wolf Blitzer.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • CQ’s Patrick Yoest is heading to Dow Jones

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Daily Collegian reports, “About 400 students gathered in the HUB Auditorium last night to hear esteemed journalist Dana Priest of The Washington Post speak as part of the Foster Conference of Distinguished Writers. Priest is a 2006 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for her disclosure of secret overseas CIA prisons. She has spent nearly 20 years reporting for The Washington Post, covering the CIA, military and counterterrorism.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Pulitzer-Winner David Cay Johnston on Times Buyout List”

  • From a tipster:

      the city paper’s article on david nakamura at the post is so silly. the city paper FOIA’d all these emails between Fenty and Nakamura — how much did that process take away from real government work? was this FOIA in the service of the public? or in the service of a bruised ego looking to settle a score?

  • API has “Five questions for … Richard Honack

  • Newspaper Association of America reports, “Some newspapers are methodically going greener, reducing energy consumption and saving money”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “Nothing seems to make our local paper happier than spotting a neighborhood in the midst of a renaissance, a rebirth, or just sort of coming back. Today, we get the happy headline: ‘A Rapid Renaissance in Columbia Heights’ under the byline of Paul Schwartzman.”

  • Iraq Was Invaded In 2002, As Far As Times Critic Is Concerned

  • The AP reports, “Moody’s Investors Service is considering downgrading New York Times Co.’s credit rating because of declining advertising revenue, the ratings agency said Tuesday. Moody’s is reviewing New York Times’ ‘Baa1′ credit rating, which implies ‘lower-medium grade” credit quality.’”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Regular readers of the Wall Street Journal will notice something new in Friday’s editions — a sports page that uses content from one of the many businesses owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.”

  • Politico reports, “Obama’s Rezko ties escape national radar”

    Top of post

    TV

  • A tipster tells us, “In a promo for MSNBCs political coverage this morning, shots of most of their ‘personalities’ were shown (in the context of the best political team on TV, or whatever the slogan was) with one notable exception: Tucker Carlson. Why is he ignored by MSNBC management?”

  • TVNewser provides an abridged version of Howard Kurtz’s 2,500 word dissertation on election coverage.

  • In the Center On Primary Night

  • The Deal.com reports, “Timing is everything: Time Warner-Cablevision deal likely”

  • Reuters reports, “Landmark Communications is seeking up to $5 billion for the Weather Channel cable television network, with preliminary bids due next week, according to multiple sources familiar with the matter.”

  • A release announced, “Senator Kerry sent a letter to Kevin Martin, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission today, asking him to investigate an Alabama television station that ‘blacked out’ during a controversial segment of 60 Minutes. Allegations have been raised that the blackout, which the station blames on ‘technical difficulties’, was an example of censorship.”

  • Super Tuesday II: The Cable Ratings

  • TVWeek reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin may be winning the fight he has picked with TV networks that air racy programming. Mr. Martin’s agency lost the last major indecency court case in federal appeals court and he’s awaiting the Supreme Court’s decision on whether it will resuscitate that action against Fox.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “TV ratings have been the gospel for the broadcasting and ad industries for nearly 60 years. They are the yardstick by which our business has determined success or failure; the reason why ‘Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip’ was canceled, why Fox loves Simon Cowell and why the Super Bowl continues to be the most important TV event every year.”

  • TVNewser reports, “America’s Election HQ, the one-hour political show that premiered last week at 5pmET, has been extended past its original end date of yesterday. The FNC program, temporarily taking the place of Big Story, will air through the end of this week.”

  • A Situation Room viewer writes, “When the phone rings at 3:00A.M., We want Wolf Blitzer to answer the phone in the situation room.”

  • Who’s That Reporter In My Studio?

  • Columbia Journalism Review writes, “Fox Business Network’s populist sensibility is refreshing, sort of, but nobody’s watching. Here’s why

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger March Meeting is set for Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00PM at RFD. To RSVP, click here.

  • Nieman Watchdog reports, “Saul Friedman: Mainstream Black Columnists and Barack Obama”

  • A tipster writes in “pr maven gloria dittus won a big award last night and the national museum of women in the arts. charlie cook introduced her, debbie dingell also at the party.”

  • Folio reports, “National Geographic Renews Legal War Over Digital Archive”

  • DMNews reports, “Southern Progress Corporation (SPC), a subsidiary of Time Inc., has launched an online portal, MyHomeIdeas.com, highlighting content from its shelter magazines and book line.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “iReport launched to be like ‘YouTube with focus on personal reporting’, claims CNN director”

  • Columbia Journalism Review reports,Jeannie Kever began her Houston Chronicle column yesterday — a column applauding the ‘US media’ for avoiding the ‘Texas cowboy stereotype’ in its primary coverage of her state”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • The Time Online reports, “Permira, the British private equity group, has emerged as a potential suitor for Reed Business Information, the trade magazines arm of Reed Elsevier, which could soon be for sale for about £1.25 billion.”

  • iReport, You Decide (if This Crap is Worth Your Time)

  • Washington City Paper’s Erik Wemple reports, “Washingtonian Publisher Has ‘Liable’ Concerns”

    Top of post

    BOOKS

  • Washingtonian’s Garrett Graff writes, “Newsweek columnist Eleanor Clift likely wishes she didn’t have a reason to write her new book, Two Weeks of Life: A Memoir of Love, Death and Politics. Two of her previous books were written with her late husband, Tom Brazaitis, Washington bureau chief of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The new one is Clift’s journal of Brazaitis’s last days, when he was in hospice care with cancer.”

  • Publisher’s Weekly reports, “The New York Times reported Monday that the Far Eastern Economic Review, which Rupert Murdoch recently acquired, killed a review of the Viking Australia book Rupert’s Adventures in China due to the book’s unfavorable look at Murdoch. With the book set for U.S. release this summer, it’s unclear how the media will handle it.”

  • Ars Technica reports, “Book lovers have a message for e-book makers: you can have my paperback when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers. We reported yesterday on the 2008 Digital Entertainment Survey from the UK, which found that 70 percent of Internet users would stop sharing files if they received notification from their ISP. But tucked in the survey data was another fascinating finding about the strength of consumer attachment to traditional paper books.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for an Education Programming Manager.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • More NPF Notes

    (Earlier: “Party Photos: National Press Foundation Dinner“)

    Some more notes from Thursday’s National Press Foundation Dinner (full list of winners and honorees here):

    -”Despite buyouts and layoffs, we need to keep doing our jobs, honestly and aggressively, now more than ever.” WSJ’s John Wilke (winner of one of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Awards for Distinguished Reporting of Congress)

    -1250 people in the audience (most ever)

    -They raised $800,000, $100,000 over last year.

    -WSJ’s Jerry Seib paid tribute to ABC’s John McWethy in his remarks.

    -In his remarks, the Houston Chronicle’s Jeff Cohen (recipient of The Benjamin C. Bradlee Editor of the Year Award) urged attendees to “keep fighting” for a federal shield law.

    -The Washington Post’s Dana Priest, who along with Anne Hull, won the Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism, said that “things have not been fixed as much as they should have” at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. “There’s so much work to be done.”

    -Mocking his age, the NYT’s Thomas Friedman (who took home the W. M. Kiplinger Distinguished Contributions to Journalism Award) quoted from Pete Seeger’s “My Get Up And Go Has Got Up And Went” during his remarks.

      I get up each morning and dust off my wits

      Open the paper and read the obits

      If I’m not there, I know I’m not dead

      So I eat a good breakfast and go back to bed

    Friedman assured the audience that he’s “only been on book leave for four months…I’ll be back….”

    He also put a positive spin on the doom-and-gloom scenarios being realized in newsrooms everywhere. “More people are engaged in journalism than ever before…I intend to stick around to see how this story ends.”

    Friedman thanked his wife, Ann, and his “other family, my New York Times family,” saying “without these two families I would have had a lifetime with a lot less achievement.”

    Priest/Hull Begin Awards Sweep

    From the release:

      Dana Priest and Anne Hull of the Washington Post are the 2008 winners of the Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting for their coverage of conditions at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

      The $35,000 annual prize, presented by the School of Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication, recognizes the year’s outstanding work in investigative journalism that led to direct results.

      Beginning in February 2007, the Post published a series of articles detailing how the once “crown jewel of military medicine” has been transformed into “a holding ground for physically and psychologically damaged outpatients” living in poor conditions and struggling in a “messy bureaucratic battlefield nearly as chaotic as the real battlefields they faced overseas.”

    << PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>