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Posts Tagged ‘Darren Goode’

Best of Newt’s Long Goodbye

Washington journalists fixated on Newt Gingrich‘s speech marking the end of his presidential campaign Wednesday afternoon. Here’s what caught our eye.

The Daily Beast‘s Robin Givhan: “Newt Gingrich: the long goodbye as pompous lecture.”

Politico’s Glenn Thrush: “This reminds me of that scene in Airplane where this guys keeps talking and all his seat mates start committing suicide.”

Politico‘s Reid Epstein: “Just fyi, the Gettysburg Address was 271 words.”

CNN’s Mark Preston: “Newt Gingrich just suspended his presidential campaign and now he is talking about his moon colony proposal.”

ReutersSam Youngman: “Somewhere Romney is saying, ok, that’s enough, Newt.”

Politico‘s Darren Goode: “I’m now officially drunk. #drinkinggame #Newt”

WaPo‘s Chris Cillizza: “Newt is, gulp, likable in this press conference. No?”

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Politico’s ‘Morning Energy’ Shifts Into Raw Masculine Muscle

If you like extremely masculine metaphors this is the announcement for you.

Starting in February, Politico‘s Morning Energy is becoming part of Politico Pro, a new subscription-based service that claims it will “deliver high-impact, high velocity” coverage of energy, technology and health care reform.

As explained to a note that went out today from Politico Pro Editor Tim Grieve, this will be “essential reading” for policy professionals. “Think of it as Morning Energy on steroids,” the memo says. This means insider coverage from Darren Samuelsohn, Josh Voorhees, Darren Goode, Robin Bravender and the rest of the energy team.

This will include:

*Instant alerts

*The latest energy headlines

*A subscriber-only afternoon briefing from Politico Pro Energy Editor Dan Berman.

The powerful male metaphors continue. Politico Pro subscribers will allegedly receive a “more muscular” version of Morning Energy. As with everything Politico, news comes insanely early. There will be a Politico Pro Morning Energy at both 6a.m. (for those who need their Morning Energy while they’re still dreaming) and 9 a.m. (for those who don’t need their Morning Energy before their shower and waffles).

The release instructs interested parties to contact Sales Director Poppy MacDonald.

Goode Plays Hopscotch With Capitol Hill Jobs

After just five months, Darren Goode is leaving The Hill for Politico. In early June he left CongressDaily to go to work for The Hill.

See our June announcement about him here. We suspect there may not be a massive going away party for this departure. But we’ll keep you posted…

Read the brief but pleasant-sounding internal memo from The Hill‘s Editor Hugo Gurdon after the jump…

Read more

The Battle of ‘Darrens’: The Hill’s Hires the ‘Best’ Energy Reporter

As of late, The Hill has shed reporters to Bloomberg News and Politico. Steadily, the publication is starting to replace them.

The two big hires:
Shane D’Aprile from Politics magazine.
Darren Goode from Congress Daily.

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Darren Goode: ‘News too
good to hold’

This Darren aside, there’s another “Darren” on the energy media landscape. Politico recently hired Darren Samuelsohn of Greewire/Energy & Environment Daily to head up its energy reporting and claimed the same thing about him — that he’s the best in the business. That publication also called it “news too good to hold.”

Editor Hugo Gurdon released this internal memo to staff via e-mail Monday afternoon:

“There are a couple of really pleasing new hires I want to tell you about.

Shane D’Aprile will be joining us from Politics magazine. He’ll be a full-time campaigns reporter/blogger, teaming up with Sean Miller, and his expertise in the business side of campaigns, with contacts among media buyers and the like, will add a new dimension to our coverage.

And in news too good to hold, I can tell you that Darren Goode write on energy and environmental issues both for the paper and the E2 Wire. When we ask experts in the field whose reporting they read, they say “Well, Darren, of course, and then…”

Shane and Darren will be here this month, and will continue the exciting growth of our print and online news operation.”

NJ Journos are Available — Like Brown’s Daughter

NJ brownstein.jpg

Atlantic Media Political Director Ron Brownstein (shown above) uttered profound words Thursday night at National Journal’s swank party at the Watergate Hotel’s University Room, where a host of NJ scribes convened to strut their stuff for bookers.

“The bar is open, the most important words in politics,” Brownstein announced. After speaking for a little while, he remarked, “I feel like sitting here I’ve already completed more consecutive words than on “Hardball” without interruption.”

The party was intended for bookers to see potential on-air talent, so the joke of the night was that NJ reporters were “available”, like Sen-elect Scott Brown’s daughters.

Sitting in a row on stools, several scribes had a chance to introduce themselves and talk briefly about what he or she does on a daily basis.

At one point talk turned to the state of the Democratic Party in Congress. CongressDaily’s Erin McPike said a “forensic examination” was going on. The Hotline’s Editor-in-Chief Amy Walter chimed in, “More like a colonoscopy.” And Brownstein: “More like an autopsy.”

The parade of introductions continued:

NJ finance reporter Bill Swindell: “I’m paid to follow Barney Frank around.”

CongressDaily health care reporter Anna Edney: “It does feel like the last year of my life has gone down the drain with this race in Massachusetts.”

In attendance besides NJ people? CNN’s Sam Feist, CBS News Bureau Chief Chris Isham, Christine Delargy, Early Show senior producer Kerri Forrest, Tammy Haddad, who helped organize the event, Hilary Rosen, and producers for CNN’s Larry King.

The party was swarming with NJ scribes from CongressDaily and The Hotline such as The Hotline’s TV Editor Abby Livingston and Wake Up Call’s Maura O’Brien. Additionally, there was Hotline Executive Editor John-Mercurio, U.S. House reporter Rich Cohen, Reid Wilson, Marilyn Werber Serafini, Dan Friedman, Darren Goode, Shane Harris, Margaret Kriz Hobson, John Maggs, Tim Sahd and David Wasserman. In addition, NJ’s Spokesman David Miller and executive assistant Meredith Nettles.

No one from FNC or MSNBC showed, which was noteworthy considering they book so many guests.

NJParty1.jpg

Live from Copenhagen: Q&A With CongressDaily‘s Goode

Goode.jpg
We caught up with CongressDaily‘s Darren-Goode in Copenhagen where he’s covering the UN Climate Change Conference. He’s writing on how developments there will impact the legislative process here.

It’s nighttime in Copenhagen and Goode’s out to dinner with a crew of D.C. reporters including Politico’s Lisa Lerer. They’re dining at Madklubben Bistro-de-luxe where Goode is seriously considering ordering the “free range piggy.” He thought that sounded only slightly more appetizing than the “crispy belly curly kale” with apples in Christmas sauce.

Q:Have you been to Copenhagen before?
A: No, I’ve never been to Denmark. It’s very pretty. Pretty chilly.

Q:What strikes you about Copenhagen?
A: It’s a good mix of old European architecture, almost a midieval look in places with a modern bent.

Q:What has the trip been like for you so far?
A: It’s my second day. Last night I was so jet-lagged and I had a cold, which I still do. I went home and took some flu pills and went to sleep for about 14 hours.

Q:What do you hope to learn there?
A: How to cover a convention. I’ve never covered a international convention before. I covered the GOP Convention in Minneapolis. Here I’m the only representative of my company.

Q: Is that nerve-wracking?
A:It is. But climate change is an area I have followed for awhile. There is so much happening all at once. It’s just a busy array of events happening everyday, and unless you stay focused on what you’re trying to do you can really get lost. [I have to not get] caught up not trying to cover 900 events. By the end of it I will hopefully understand what it is to cover something of this scale.

Q: Does competing with all the other reporters there worry you?
A: I’m always nervous I’m going to miss something or get scooped. At the same time, we’re not going to compete with AP. We’re not going to compete with the wires that have teams of folks here. It’s finding our own niche and writing stories you can’t get from the wires. My job is to not feel like I have to compete with everybody else. There is always that tendency. I have competitors here that I see almost everyday on Capitol Hill. You still have the same mindset that I have to beat you and you and you and you. For me, that means finding a congressional angle and trying to run with that.

More Goode-ness after the jump…

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Taking Out the Trash

Editor & Publisher reports NYT’s private jet is up for sale. Any takers?

Speaking of planes, Roll Call reported earlier today that Sen. David Vitter caused quite the scene at the airport last week, joining what Emily Heil and Elizabeth Brotherton called the “Mile-Low Club.” Their tipster who witnessed the scene said Vitter arrived late to the gate and, “Undeterred, Vitter opened the door, setting off a security alarm and prompting an airline worker to warn him that entering the gate was forbidden… employing the timeworn “do-you-know-who-I-am” tirade that apparently grew quite heated.” But Vitter says it isn’t so. He tells the Times-Picayune that report was “overstated” and says “I did have a conversation with an airline employee, but it was certainly not like this silly gossip column made it out to be.”

Is Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly responsible for a dip in GE stock? Find out here.

Even more former IWP’ers have been brought to our attention today: CongressDaily’s Megan Scully, Darren Goode, Anna Edney and Chris Strohm, Roll Call’s CongressNow’s Steve Langel, Salon’s Mark Benjamin and last, but certainly not least, Dow Jones Newswires’ Martin Vaughan.

Morning Reading List, 10.17.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Rowan Scarborough has left the Washington Examiner. He says, “after a stint in the Navy, 30 years at five newspapers and two book, I’m retiring, while eyeing some new projects in 2008.”

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast during the week of October 8-12, 2007.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-third time in twenty-five weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the most-watched evening newscast among Adults 25-54.”

  • Reuters reports, “Gossip is more powerful than truth, a study showed on Monday, suggesting people believe what they hear through the grapevine even if they have evidence to the contrary.”

  • Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez doesn’t like reporters either.

  • A release announced, “On Tuesday, October 23, the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Middle East Program will host a debut book launch and discussion with Barbara Slavin, senior diplomatic reporter for USA Today and Jennings Randolph fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Slavin will present Bitter Friends, Bosom Enemies: Iran, the U.S., and the Twisted Path to Confrontation, which builds on her six trips to Iran, from 1996 to 2006, and extensive reporting on U.S. diplomacy toward Iran through the summer of 2007.” For more details, click here.

  • An NPR release announced, “Maria Thomas, who has directed NPR’s digital media activities since 2001 as Vice President and General Manager, Online, has been named Senior Vice President, Digital Media. Thomas is responsible for NPR’s online and on-demand operations as well as its consumer products and e-commerce business and its library and archival activities.”

  • NBC announced, “Tim Russert will moderate a three-hour discussion on energy among leading Republican and Democratic presidential candidates at “Houston’s Presidential Summit” on Nov. 13, 2007, from 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. (EST). The Summit is sponsored by the Greater Houston Partnership. Portions of the event will air live on MSNBC. All three hours of ‘Houston’s Presidential Summit’ will stream live on MSNBC.com.”

  • RCN announced it has launched ESPN360.com and ABC News Now. “As a result, RCN internet customers will have free access to ESPN’s signature, next-generation broadband sports network, as well as interactive ABC TV news programming.”

  • Velvet in Dupont is not fan of The Washington Post and their blog roll.

  • DCist Comments Now Require Registration

  • Don’t forget! The Washington Blogger Meetup October Meetup is today at 7:00 p.m. at RDF. To RSVP, click here.

  • A tipster tells us, “Congress Daily’s Darren Goode got married Saturday night in a ceremony that included Blues Brothers impersonators doing backflips.”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media writes, “Page Six didn’t just rip off today’s item about a supposed conflict of interest at The New York Times Book Review — it ripped it off wrong.”

  • The City Paper writes, “If you’ve been assaulted or murdered by somebody of another race, or you’ve assaulted or murdered somebody of another race, Howard Witt is probably on your case. And he’s gonna make you famous. Plainly, nobody in the news business has had a year like Witt, the former City Paper editor. He broke the Jena 6 story with a May article in the Chicago Tribune, where he now heads up the paper’s Southwestern bureau.”

  • Washington Post’s Dan Froomkin writes, “Just what is the relationship like between President Bush and Vice President Cheney? Behind closed doors, who defers to whom? PBS’s ‘Frontline’ documentary series tonight chronicles Cheney’s relentless, secretive and smashingly successful quest to expand executive power.”

  • Talking Radio reports, “Randi Rhodes was mugged on Sunday night on 39th Street and Park Ave, nearby her Manhattan apartment, while she was walking her dog Simon. According to Air America Radio late night host Jon Elliott, Rhodes was beaten up pretty badly, losing several teeth and will probably be off the air for at least the rest of the week. At of late Monday night we have not able to locate any press accounts of the attack and nothing has been posted on the AAR website.”

  • The Washington Post opines, “The Post’s Salih Saif Aldin was committed to reporting the truth from Iraq.”

  • Variety reports, “Katie Couric’s recent trip to Iraq and Syria didn’t light up the ratings — and it certainly didn’t stop speculation over how long she can last in the anchor chair.”

  • New York Times reports, “On the day they had contracted to run advertisements placed by CNBC, two Web sites owned by Dow Jones & Company instead ran ads for that cable business channel’s new competitor, the Fox Business Network.”

  • Portfolio’s Felix Salmon writes, “I do wish that Mark Gimein will start blogging: he’s a natural. He’s provocative, and interesting, and – at least until the final entry of his guest-blogging stint at Time – unafraid to write long. (This is your own place, Mark! If you want to write long, feel free!) But he has a vision of ‘online journalism bifurcat[ing] into reporting and commentary’, with blogging in the latter category and serious journalism in the former.”

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “It’s no secret that Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen has never met a personal pronoun he didn’t like.”

  • The PEJ News Coverage Index for the week of October 7-12 shows, “last week was actually unusual in that three frightening stories of random violence generated coverage-with two making the top-10 story list. Plus, the media are all over Fred Thompson’s debate debut.”

  • JibJab, “is now offering its audience a chance to star in their very own JibJab movie. The videos, entitled ‘Night of the Living Democrats’ and ‘Night of the Living Republicans’, are comedic spins on the horror classic, ‘Night of the Living Dead’. They are available here.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC’s Greta Van Susteren appears in the documentary ‘Girl 27,’ now on DVD. Director David Stenn used Van Susteren to bring a contemporary slant to a decades-old Hollywood scandal.”

  • Patti Shea announced that the next issue of Voice of the Hill will be her last issue as managing editor. “I was offered a job at AARP to do editorial work for their website and it was too good to pass up.”

  • Poynter Online’s Rich Gordan writes, “We shouldn’t let the backlash to Roy Peter Clark’s article Your Duty to Read the Paper let us miss the fact that he diagnosed a real and important problem: The economic model of print newspapers is falling apart and is not being replaced online.”

  • Folio reports, “Given the often-beleaguered state of print advertising, any increase should be considered good news, so this news should thrill consumer magazine publishers: the Magazine Publishers of America’s Publishers Information Bureau is reporting that total rate-card-reported advertising revenue increased 5.6 percent for the first nine months of 2007 when compared to the same period last year. Total ad pages, however, dipped one percent over the same period.”

  • News.com.au reports, “Conaumers who get their news from the internet are likely to trust a blog for reliability as much as a mainstream media site, the competition watchdog said.”

  • Canada.com reports, “Electronic media saturation is leaving Canadian families time-crunched, over-stimulated and virtual strangers in their own homes, according to a new report from the Vanier Institute of the Family.”

  • A Reporters Without Borders release announced, “Bloggers now threatened as much as journalists in traditional media,”according to the new worldwide press freedom index.

  • Washingtonpost.com announced “the launch of its new Shopping section featuring comprehensive local listings of new and used products, including local coupons and promotions, and a national price comparison search powered by Become.com, the online shopping site that integrates product-focused Web search with comparison shopping.” Check it out here.

  • Washingtonpost.com also launched a special feature package on health insurance.

  • TVNewer has the details of “CNN’s America Votes 2008.”

  • We hear that The Washington Examiner was victorious at the 1st annual softball challenge against the Baltimore Examiner team, with a 22-15 run score.

  • MinOnline reports, “But the best way to make friends in a virtual social environment is to give the cool kids the tools that make them seem, well, cooler. An interesting Facebook experiment from CondéNet is already demonstrating this party principle. It just started building Facebook apps that let users shout out what they are wearing now and find and show the recipes they are consulting.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., seeking to avoid additional copyright lawsuits, introduced technology for its YouTube video-sharing site that flags clips posted by users who don’t own the content.”

  • TheStreet.com reports, “News of more layoffs at AOL came as no surprise on Wall Street, where recent setbacks for the beleaguered Web concern have convinced many investors that its media-giant parent, Time Warner, needs to get rid of the business.”

  • Reuters reports, Rupert Murdoch’s Fox Business Network made its debut on Monday, seeking to broaden the business news audience with interviews with Hillary Clinton, Alan Greenspan and Richard Branson, but initial reactions were lukewarm.”

  • Newsday reports, “How much is Cablevision Systems Corp. — the owner of the Knicks, Rangers, Madison Square Garden and Radio City Music Hall — really worth? Maybe more than the $22 billion the founding Dolan family is willing to pay to take the company private, according several shareholders and advisory companies. The total includes the $10.6-billion purchase price and the assumption of debt.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Broadcasters plan to spend $697 million to educate television viewers about a shift in 2009 to digital broadcasting. Members of the National Association of Broadcasters, including the major television networks, will participate in the campaign, the Washington-based trade group said today in a statement distributed by e-mail.”

  • New York Times’ TV Decoder reports, “The ‘big four’ television networks are continuing to lose audience share. Nielsen Media Research released the ‘live plus seven day’ ratings for premiere week today. The numbers include seven days of DVR playback and show that DVRs are stopping some, but not all, of the viewership erosion.”

  • Multichannel.com reports, “Nearly 16% of American households who use the Internet watch television broadcasts online, according to a report released Monday by The Conference Board and TNS.”

  • San Francisco Chronicle reports, “Seventy percent of the 18- to 34-year-olds watching Current TV are noodling around on their laptops at the same time.”

  • Providence Journal reports, “The independent newspaper company that Belo Corp., of Texas, plans to establish early next year could have one of the most robust balance sheets in the business. But the company — of which the Providence Journal is to be part — would continue to face problems that bedevil the traditional media industry, including a general slump in advertising revenue and a continuing shift by consumers to the Internet.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy Co., the publisher of 31 daily newspapers including the Miami Herald, said third-quarter profit fell 55 percent as shrinking U.S. home sales cut real estate advertising. The stock fell to its lowest since 1996.”

  • Check out The Board, “a new blog, written by members of the New York Times editorial board.”

  • TVNewser reports, “With the impending return of Don Imus to the radio airwaves, (first reported yesterday on Drudge Report) the talker who replaced him, and the one who may be replaced, are talking. HuffPost’s Rachel Sklar has the clip from Morning Joe.”

  • Media Matter’s Eric Boehlert writes, “Between Michelle Malkin Swift Boating a traumatically injured 12-year-old boy, Rush Limbaugh denigrating anti-war veterans, and Bill O’Reilly insulting black Americans (not to mention Ann Coulter dissing Jews), the mighty right-wing media machine — firmly attached to the hip of the Republican Party — is in the process of driving American conservatism right off a cliff.”

  • Reuters reports, “E.W. Scripps Co said on Tuesday that it would split itself into two publicly traded companies, the second U.S. newspaper publisher and broadcaster in a month to break apart in a bid to boost its market value. Shares of the company rose nearly.”

  • Bmighty.com reports, “The Conference Board says that this year, more people looked for jobs online in the newspaper — 73% to 65%. Just two years ago, those percentages were pretty much reversed.”

    Jobs

  • American University-WAMU 88.5 FM is looking for an experienced Radio Producer for The Kojo Nnamdi Show.

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Experienced Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer — The Hotline.
  • The Altavista Journal is looking for an Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext