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Posts Tagged ‘Daryn Kagan’

Morning Reading List, 01.28.09

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Good morning Washington.

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We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Andrea Koppel and Daryn Kagan at Women on the World Conference

Andrea Koppel and Daryn Kagan talked yesterday at Leading Authorities’ Women on the World conference in DC. They discussed their individual experiences as journalists at CNN and how their careers as journalists shaped what they are doing now.

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Morning Reading List, 03.27.08

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Good morning Washington. Dana Bash and John King will get married on Cape Cod over Memorial Day weekend.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You would rather hang out with Barack Obama over Michelle.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Atlantic Names New Publisher Jay Lauf

  • More Changes to ABC News Executive Ranks

  • Andrea Jones is leaving her position as Executive Director of ABC News and Emily Lenzner is taking her place.

  • Linda Greenhouse Returning To Yale Law School in 2009 as Journalist-in-Residence

  • A release announced, “Michael Flagg, a veteran business reporter and editor at the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg and the Washington Post, has joined the Washington, D.C. office of Manning Selvage & Lee (MS&L) as senior vice president. His appointment is effective immediately.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Washington Times won seven awards in the 2007 Virginia Press Association’s annual competition for writing, photography, artwork and news design.

  • A reader asks, “Why was McCain off limits with the media? Is it because of his advanced years or because he’s a war hero or both? everything was coming up roses for McCain with the Media. Guess that was good for him, since his senior moments crop up every once in awhile.”

  • Finding Political News Online, the Young Pass It On

  • Huffington Post’s Thomas Edsall presents, “Interview With Walter Pincus On The State Of The Press”

  • Romenesko has “Tribune innovation chief Lee Abrams’ e-mail to staff”

  • AJR asks, “Why is the media consensus so often wrong about political campaigns? And isn’t there a better way to cover elections?”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. President and Chief Executive Janet Robinson received total compensation valued at $2.1 million in 2007 but got no stock options, reducing her pay 38 percent from a year ago, according to calculations by The Associated Press.”

  • AJR reports, “Why news organizations have to act much more boldly if they are to survive”

  • Check out Green Room Girl’s latest pictures featuring Howard Wolfson and David Brooks.

  • Nielsen Online Names Top 30 News Sites

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “The New York Times has been around for 156 years. For all that time, it has trusted its readers, more or less, to find what they’re looking for. Not anymore. Today saw the introduction of ‘Inside the Times,’ a new multi-page index of that day’s highlights, in print and online, which runs on pages 2, 3 and 4 of section A. The purpose is ‘to help readers navigate and mine the paper and its Web site,’ according to an editor’s note.”

  • Politico, Viacom, Paramount Vantage are teaming up to present a private screening of the new Rolling Stones, Scorsese Shine a Light film on the eve of the White House Correspondent’s dinner, April 25th at the National Cable & Telecommunications Association.

  • Kelly Flynn writes, “No news is bad news for Kearsley journalism students”

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    TV

  • Mark your calendars! On April 2, nine women will speak at the “Women on the World” at the Chamber of Commerce, including Daryn Kagan, Jenna Bush, Andrea Koppel, Kelly O’Donnell and Donna Brazile. For more on what Kagan has been up to, click here.

  • A CNN release announced, “Following a campaign coverage strategy of creating mini-bureaus in key political battleground states, CNN has parked the CNN Election Express in Philadelphia this week to create a full-time reporting presence for the April 22 Pennsylvania primary.”

  • TVNewser reports, “This morning marked new NBC/MSNBC analyst Harold Ford, Jr.’s first appearance on Morning Joe. Co-anchor Joe Scarborough brought up his time in congress with Ford, and how the pair ‘transcended politics,’ as they sat on opposite sides of the aisle.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. advertising spending was little changed in the fourth quarter as a weakening economy prompted marketers to cut newspaper and radio ads, according to TNS Media Intelligence.”

  • USA Today reports, “Advertisers and marketers, struggling to keep up with changing consumer habits, are about to make massive investments in new digital and out-of-home media platforms, according to a forecast out today from research firm PQ Media.”

  • A release announced, “FOX 5 finishes the March 2008 news race as the #1 choice for late news in key adult demographics, announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. ‘FOX 5 News Edge at 11′ and ‘FOX 5 News at 10′ rank #1 in their respective time periods.”

  • JackMeyers.com reports, “Assuming this week’s release of fourth quarter GDP data confirms an official recessionary economy, marketers, media companies, economists and unofficial economic pundits will weigh in with appropriately reactionary forecasts of ad industry doom and gloom.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “Over the past two years, Lynda Clarizio has helped build Advertising.com, AOL’s ad network, into one of the hottest properties in online advertising. Her reward: She gets to try to clean up one of the Internet company’s messiest divisions.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The two biggest U.S. cable providers, Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc., are discussing a plan to provide funding for a new wireless company that would be operated by Sprint Nextel Corp. and Clearwire Corp., people familiar with the talks say.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “On the morning of Friday, March 21, Chris Wallace woke up at his home in Washington, D.C., grabbed some fruit and yogurt, and turned on the Fox News early show, Fox & Friends. Steve Doocy, Gretchen Carlson and Brian Kilmeade were talking about Barack Obama’s recent characterization of his grandmother on a Philadelphia radio show: She was a ‘typical white person, who, if she sees somebody on the street that she doesn’t know, there’s a reaction that’s been bred into our experiences that don’t go away and that sometimes comes out in the wrong way.’ ‘Can you say ‘typical white person’ if you’re white?’ asked Mr. Doocy. Of course not, noted Ms. Carlson. There’s no way that Senator Hillary Clinton could use the phrase ‘typical black person,’ they noted. ‘So there is a certain double standard in society,’ said Ms. Carlson. And also: ‘I sort of take offense at that line: ‘typical white.” Mr. Wallace was getting a little bit annoyed. ‘I didn’t think it was fair. I didn’t think it allowed Obama to make his point,’ Mr. Wallace later told The Observer in a telephone interview.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • 24/7 Wall St. presents, “The Twenty-Five Most Valuable Blogs”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “How dreadful was the news coverage last week surrounding the official release of Hillary Clinton’s public White House schedule from her eight years as first lady? So bad that I found myself in rare (unprecedented?) agreement with at least two prominent conservative bloggers who noticed the same thing I did: The Beltway press corps is, at times, a national embarrassment.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Hillary Clinton’s Bosnia Story A Hit On YouTube!”

  • Gangrey.com presents the winner of the 2008 Goat Awards.

  • Media Week reports, “Time Inc., which has been hit by sweeping layoffs in recent years, has continued to pare its head count in its quest for cost-savings, albeit in smaller ways. This Old House shed four people in the past few weeks in communications, production and TV production, while at Sports Illustrated, a handful of people were laid off from the title’s Picture Collection archive. (Some of the SI staffers were to be assigned to other positions in the company, a Time Inc. spokesperson said.)”

  • Mesh Media Strategies reports, “I was privileged to join a group of bloggers, along with TV news executives and personnel from the Washington DC area, Monday night for a reception and private tour of the soon-to-open Newseum in the nation’s capital. In a word, it is spectacular.”

  • The Annenberg School for Communication at USC Online Journalism Review reports, “J-schools need to encourage and develop, not inhibit, students’ passion — not only for the favorite topics, but for the craft of journalism itself.”

  • MinOnline reports, “Tribune Media Services (TMS), the content syndication and licensing division of Chicago-based Tribune Company, will launch a new weekly political commentary magazine called Opinionated: Voices and Viewpoints on America and the World.”

  • The San Jose Business Journal reports, “Yahoo Inc.’s HotJobs feature on Tuesday launched a search ranking algorithm called REAL — Relevance, Engagement, Availability and Location. Sunnyvale-based Yahoo (NASDAQ:YHOO) said the system is part of an overall strategic initiative designed to ‘make the recruiting process more efficient using Yahoo technology and to provide recruiters with unique insights into job seeker behavior.’”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Reader’s Digest’s Carl Cannon was interviewed on C-SPAN by Bob Schieffer this past weekend. Check out the interview here.

  • What you missed last night: Atlantic Media’s Journalism on Tap, a panel discussion on the upcoming election.

  • WWD.com reports, “Financial market turbulence, housing bubble bursts, Bear Stearns collapses — no wonder advertising isn’t looking rosy (or that most publishers don’t want to go on the record and talk about it). As the end of the first half draws near for magazines, business looks soft. Through April, the latest Media Industry Newsletter numbers show ad pages declined for most fashion titles and the unpredictable economy makes it impossible to predict how things will end up by June, much less the entire year.”

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    RADIO

  • A release announced, “Beginning Wednesday, April 2, at 9 p.m., the National Symphony Orchestra will return to the airwaves of Classical WETA 90.9 FM. Performances are being drawn from NSO archives, and most broadcast programs will feature repertoire from multiple NSO concerts. These two-hour broadcasts will take place on the first Wednesday of each month for the next year. WETA’s John Chester will host. The series is made possible by WETA’s Friends of Classical Music, including Patricia Sagon.”

  • The Wall Street Journal writes, “The Justice Department’s approval this week of the XM-Sirius satellite radio merger was a long time coming — maybe too long given that the deal was announced more than a year ago. Still, credit Antitrust Division chief Thomas Barnett for making the right call in the end.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “One of the marquee deals of the now-faded corporate buyout boom was close to collapse Tuesday night, a victim of the credit-market turmoil that began last summer. The planned $19 billion privatization of the nation’s largest radio broadcaster, Clear Channel Communications Inc., looked increasingly likely to fall through as the private-equity firms and banks backing the transaction failed to resolve their differences over final financing terms, people familiar with the matter said. It would be one of the biggest leveraged buyouts yet to implode as the upheaval in global credit markets has made it nearly impossible for banks that financed such deals to spread their risk by packaging their loans for sale to other investors. That’s left many banks exposed to massive losses they have been trying to avoid.”

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    BOOKS

  • GalleyCat answers the question, “How’s Book Publishing Handling the Election?”

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    JOBS

  • Politico is looking for a Weekend Editor.

  • Human Events is hiring a Manager Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 05.30.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You would rather have 15 hour work days and a three day weekend.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for May Sweeps, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ averaged 2.55 million Total Viewers, marking the program’s best May sweep among Total Viewers since 2002. In addition, ‘This Week’ was the only Sunday discussion program to increase among Total Viewers.”

  • An NBC release announced that “Meet the Press with Tim Russert” was the “top-rated Sunday morning public affairs program, placing first in all categories during the May 2007 sweep period.” During the month, the NBC program attracted 3.405 million total viewers, a 30% advantage over CBS’s “Face the Nation”, a 33% lead over third place ABC’s “This Week” and 128% more than FOX’s “News Sunday” 1.493 million.

  • Tribune Co. redraws newspaper management chart

  • The AP reports, “CNN will give away access to an online video service that now costs $25 a year, becoming the latest news organization to revamp its revenue model on the Web.”

  • A quarterly report of the PEJ News Coverage Index for Spring, 2007 shows, “The war in Iraq has dwarfed all other topics in the American news media in the early months of 2007 — taking up more than three times the space devoted to the next most popular subject. But only a portion of this has focused on the state of things in Iraq itself, and even less about the plight of Iraqis and the internal affairs of their country, according to a new study of the American news media.”

  • Is that Tucker Carlson staring at you on the cover of The Georgetowner?

  • C-SPAN announced that that they are kicking off a week of “Road to the White House” coverage featuring 2008 presidential candidates all week.

  • The New York Times reports, “The Federal Trade Commission has opened a preliminary antitrust investigation into Google’s planned $3.1 billion purchase of the online advertising company DoubleClick, an industry executive briefed on the agency’s plans”

  • Media Matters for America yesterday released “Left Behind: The Skewed Representation of Religion in Major News Media,” a special report “documenting the disparity between media coverage of conservative and progressive religious leaders.” Check it out here.

  • A reader asks, “have you seen yesterday’s wapo and NYT food sections? they ran the same cover story”

  • New York Times David Carr writes, “Many of the journalists who are in Iraq have been backed into fortified corners, rarely venturing out to see what soldiers confront. And the remaining journalists who are embedded with the troops in Iraq — the number dropped to 92 in May from 126 in April — are risking more and more for less and less.”

  • The PEJ Talk Show Index shows, “Overall, the immigration debate was the second most popular topic for the week of May 13-18, filling 19% of the airtime on the cable and radio talk shows according to PEJ’s Talk Show Index. And the hosts’ response was a clear illustration of the talkers’ unique role in the news landscape.”

  • Dale McFeatters writes of the Democrats shunning Fox: “This is still the run up to the primaries and the Democrats are appealing to a narrow base of party regulars and activists and that quite clearly isn’t Fox News but shunning the network seems uncomfortably close to running from a fight. It’s certainly not what you would call bold.”

  • FT.com reports, “According to new estimates by the Newspaper Association of America, online advertising revenues reached $750m in the first quarter of 2007, just over 7 per cent of the total advertising revenue of $10.6bn.”

  • A reader writes, “Not that I am trying to stick up for Politico — I am with everyone else in often questioning just what it is they are doing over there — just want to explain why they didn’t have anything (most likely) about the Goodling story. They’re deadline was probably Thursday, maybe Friday, last week. Whereas Express actually worked on Memorial Day and got real, updated news in the paper. On another note, how low can you go: BlogJam?!?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The unexpectedly stiff borrowing terms that Tribune Co. accepted in its plan to go private are likely to increase the chance of significant asset sales by the Chicago-based media company, debt experts say.”

  • Were there firetrucks outside the New York Times DC bureau yesterday? Why?

  • In his first ever podcast, former Vice President Al Gore talks to TIME’s Eric Pooley about his new book, The Assault on Reason, his crusade to stop global warming and the reasons he has been so careful not to rule out a presidential bid.

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Tribune Co. disclosed Friday afternoon that its earlier agreement to sell two Connecticut newspapers to Gannett Co. for $73 million has been called off in the wake of an unfavorable arbritrator’s ruling regarding Gannett’s plan not to honor an existing union contract at one of the papers.”

  • Meredith Books announced that Daryn Kagan has signed a publishing agreement with their book division. “The agreement will include a book based on Kagan’s unique brand of positive and hopeful news stories from her popular Web site, www.DarynKagan.com.”

  • PublicEye on “Faulty Fox News?”

  • It’s DCRTV’s May Fundraiser.

  • AFP reports that Gore “criticized the ‘trivialities and nonsense’ of celebrity gossip in the media and called on people to focus instead on issues like Iraq and climate change.”

  • Jack Shafer wonders, “Can Murdoch Pass the Stink Test?

  • AdAdge.com reports, “Internet ad revenue grew 35% in 2006, with search, display, classifieds and lead-generation categories continuing to rise at a healthy clip while e-mail, sponsorship and slotting fees remained flat or lost share of the total online ad market.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Brands ranging from Gap to Victoria’s Secret, Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Nike and Adidas are increasingly finding a home on YouTube, MySpace and similar sites, where their videos, commercials, behind-the-scenes footage and fashion shows are posted for free. These sites have the potential to transform the way fashion brands reach their current and future customers since hundreds of thousands of people can view a single spot — with humorous ones scoring the most hits.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The independent firms that measure online traffic have been accused of undercounting minority Web surfers, overestimating visitors by more than double and ignoring Web users at work.”

  • Variety reports, “ABC is hoping to reinvent the newsmagazine for the YouTube generation with a show produced by ABC News but based on user-generated video. Hourlong skein ‘i-Caught’ will get a six-week run on the network starting Aug. 6 at 10pm on Mondays with an eye toward a midseason return if it performs as well as the network hopes.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Magazine publishers are facing a radical postage rate restructuring that favors those with large circulations and transfers costs to small- and mid-circulation publications.”

  • The AP reports, “Sony Corp. says it will introduce its first HD Radio products in July, joining the growing group of companies seeking to make the next-generation digital radio technology a standard feature in audio products over the next several years.”

  • Deadline Hollywood Daily reports, “NBC Entertainment Prez Kevin Reilly has been fired. … Meanwhile, NBC has clinched 36-year-old prolific producer Ben Silverman as its new showbiz honcho. He’ll have a bigger title than Reilly did. It’ll be NBC Universal West Coast chairman or something.”

  • Rain Bird Corporation is putting out the call for entries to The Intelligent Use of Water Film Competition, which seeks short films (1-20 minutes in actual or excerpted run time) that focus on the topic of water conservation. “Narrative, documentary, animated, experimental and/or student-made productions should explore approaches and ideas to intelligently manage and efficiently utilize the Earth’s most precious resource.” Contest rules and entry guidelines are available here.

    Jobs

  • Atlantic Media Company is offering a Diversity Fellowship. They are also looking for an Advertising Director and an Account Manager.

  • Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation is looking for a Communications Associate, a Writer/Editor and a Media Manager.

  • SmartBrief is looking for a Business News Producer/Editor

  • Biblical Archaeology Society is looking for an Assistant Editor

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division/writer.

  • The Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland is looking for a J-Lab Project Coordinator.

  • The Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter and a Sports Reporter.

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for an Advertising Sales Representative.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.03.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Lots and lots and lots of coverage of the recent Tribune deal. (Hat Tip: Romenesko)

  • Almost no one got busted by an April Fools joke. Are you too smart or no fun?

  • Jack Hurley, “deputy director/senior VP, broadcasting, for the Newseum and its backer, the Freedom Forum” talks to B&C’s John Eggerton.

  • At AFI Silver, an Arch Look at ‘Broadcast News’

  • We’re At War; That’s Front-Page News Every Day

  • E&P reports, “While newspaper circulation continues to slide, readership is growing, especially with younger readers — when taking online newspaper sites into consideration. According to the latest data from the Newspaper Association of America, newspaper Web sites contributed a 13.7% increase in total newspaper audience for adults 25-to-34.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “MSNBC.com, the No. 2-ranked news Web site behind Yahoo News, is starting its first branding ad campaign this week.”

  • Are journalists predisposed to substance abuse? Tell us what you think.

  • Slate gives us this: “The WP takes a moment to explain why President Bush opting not to throw out the first pitch at a ballgame isn’t news. TP is just as confused as you are.”

  • Washington Whispers reports that Daryn Kagan “has found a new outlet for her special style of reporting: PBS. Come June, she airs Breaking the Curse, a documentary about a mom who dealt with her daughter’s death by helping Indians with leprosy.” More here.

  • CQ reports, “Baseball’s New TV Deal Draws Hill Scrutiny.” It is also drawing scrutiny from Virginians.

  • Chris Wallace torches Keith Olbermann.

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “American Capital Strategies and an affiliate have invested $160 million in Geosign Group Holdings and Geosign Corp., collectively known as Geosign, an online publishing company
  • Business Week explores the question, “Is Google Too Powerful?”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy is in talks to form advertising partnerships with Google, Yahoo and Microsoft to grab a greater share of Internet spending, says CEO Gary Pruitt.”

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner’s AOL says its Advertising.com unit will manage advertising sold on a new online video venture being built by News Corp. and NBC Universal. Advertising.com will also manage ads inserted into an embedded media player to be used by the venture’s distribution partners.”

  • New York Daily News reports, “Should New York mayor Mike Bloomberg run for president of the United States, he will have a major ally in Rupert Murdoch.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “Comcast chief Brian Roberts received about $27.8 million in compensation last year, according to a statement the company filed with federal regulators.

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times’s new Classic Crossword Widget gives users the ability to personalize their Google home page with the newspaper’s crossword puzzle.”

  • Beet TV reports, “The Washington Post is revamping its home page to make video more prominent. A new, sleek, black media player, spanning nearly the entire width of the page, displays three windows with featured videos. The player can be ‘pushed’ to the right to present more multimedia offerings.”

  • M V Kamath, chairman of Prasar Bharati, India’s national public broadcaster, predicts a gloomy future for newspapers.”

  • Radar reports, “The Huffington Post, the left-leaning opinion collective and news aggregator that bears her name, is adding hundreds of new diarists in time for its two-year anniversary on May 9.”

  • Drudge reports, “During a live press conference in Baghdad, Senators McCain and Graham were heckled by CNN reporter Michael Ware.”

  • TVNewser tells us, “Greenfield May Be On CBS Within Month.” CBS News President Sean McManus said, “Jeff’s writing, reporting and analytical skills are second to none.” Greenfield’s start date is May 1.

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “Discovery Communications says it has agreed to buy Cox Communications’ 25 percent stake in the company for $1.28 billion.”

  • Gawker took “a little gander” at some of Salon’s recent filings with the SEC.

  • TVNewser has highlights from Newsday’s profile on Sean Hannity.

  • FOX News Channel tells us they were the first cable news network to break today’s tragic news of the shooting in Seattle at the University of Washington.

  • Yesterday from Reporters Without Borders: “Reporters Without Borders today voiced its serious concern about the continued detention in the Gaza Strip of British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) reporter Alan Johnston and appealed to the Palestinian Authority president and prime minister to take a tougher line with his kidnappers to obtain his release.”

  • Politico’s Ryan Grim takes “A Jab at JibJab.”

  • Mark Lasswell thinks George Stephanopoulos “knows more than he lets on about firing U.S. attorneys.”

  • Slate is fixing up The Fray “with the help of our users.”

  • Last night was the first night of “World News’” special series — “Key to the World” — that is taking ABC’s Bill Weir to remote places that are examples of the major challenges of our time. Last night was from Kiribati in the Pacific Ocean. Check out the report.

  • A reader writes in, “It’s been my experience that people who comment online tend to be obsessive trolls whose opinions should be taken with a grain of salt (and yes, I realize that I am currently commenting on a blog). Post.com is still the best news website around. And it looks clean and articulate. Just like Barry O. And no, I don’t work for WaPo.”

  • Taking Out The Trash, 02.02.07

  • This is the one time of year commercials get some love.
  • C-SPAN reports that New York Times Baghdad correspondent John Burns confirms that he’ll remain in Iraq until mid-summer before moving to London to become bureau chief. Burns confirmed it during a taping of Q & A on Friday.
  • In his online chat today, Jonathan Weisman notes, “Reporters on television — and in on-line chats — put themselves into a perilous place. We are supposed to keep our opinions ourselves, and at the same time, be engaging and fun. That said Tom Ricks’ book Fiasco definitely takes a strong point of view, backed up extensively by facts, and no one has jumped
    on him.” (Hat Tip: Romenesko)

  • Julie Mason reports, “A suspcious package prompted the evacuation of the press corps’ temporary White House press room on Jackson Place this morning. A dog apparently sniffed out some explosives in a car parked nearby.” Don’t worry. It was a false alarm.
  • This weekend on C-SPAN2, Book TV will air an “Encore Booknotes” program with columnist Molly Ivins. In 1998, C-SPAN’s Brian Lamb interviewed Ivins about her latest book, “You Got to Dance With Them What Brung You: Politics in the Clinton Years” for the award-winning author interview series “Booknotes.” The interview airs on Saturday at 1:15 pm ET and Sunday at 9:30 a.m ET.
  • RockCritics.com’s Jason Gross picks his best music writing for 2006. Among the winners are the Washington Post’s Philip Kennicott and Hank Stuever. Somewhere, Josh du Lac quietly weeps…and not over concerns that his name isn’t as cool as Russ McCracken’s.

    Lots more below…

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