FishbowlNY TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘David Pogue’

Garance Franke-Ruta Joins Yahoo News as Washington Editor

Garance Franke-Ruta joins Yahoo News as Washington Editor the company announced today. In her new role, Franke-Ruta will work with Yahoo News’ team of reporters to further develop and grow original content and political news coverage.

Franke-Ruta was most recently with The Atlantic where she was a senior editor covering national politics.

“Garance has the creativity, passion and experience that Yahoo News needs to break news and create conversation with our political coverage,” said Megan Liberman, editor in chief of Yahoo News, in today’s announcement. “She also happens to be one of the smartest and most social media savvy political journalists in the business. I am delighted to have her guiding our Washington bureau.”

Franke-Ruta has also worked at The Washington PostThe American Prospect, the Washington City PaperThe New Republic and National Journal magazines. She was named one of the top 140 Tweeters of 2013 by TIME magazine and in 2012 led the Atlantic politics team, editing coverage that contributed to TheAtlantic.com receiving the 2013 National Magazine Award for Best Website.

Yahoo recent hires include tech columnist David Pogue, Yahoo News editor in chief Megan Liberman, national political columnist Matt Bai, and the addition of Katie Couric as Yahoo News’ Global Anchor.

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you'll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

Where Are They Now? New York Times Edition

The New York TimesHuffPo’s Michael Calderone wonders if the The New York Times has a retention problem. The answer: “Good Lord, Yes!”

In just the last few months, he notes, the list of former high-profile Timesmen and women has swelled to include:

Nate Silver (now at ESPN/ABC), Brian Stelter (CNN), Matt Bai (Yahoo News), Megan Liberman (Yahoo News), David Pogue (Yahoo News), Jeff Zeleny (ABC), Susan Saulny (ABC), Lisa Tozzi (BuzzFeed), Judy Battista (NFL/NFL.com), Howard Beck (Bleacher Report), Rick Berke (Politico), and Eric Wilson (InStyle)

From Calderone’s article:

The Times has long enjoyed a position atop the media pecking order and the cachet of working at the “Paper of Record” remains both a draw for recruiting talent and keeping it. But it’s no longer the case that the Times can rely on prestige alone as talent fields competitive offers from both TV networks and also online sites that can pay significantly more money, provide greater journalistic freedom and offer multi-platform visibility — or some combination of the three.

Read the whole thing here.

 

Matt Bai to Yahoo News

Matt BaiMatt Bai is leaving New York Times Magazine for Yahoo News, where he will serve as National Political Columnist. Bai, who is known for connecting his political coverage to larger trends in technology and pop culture, has covered the last three presidential campaigns for the Times Magazine.

“Matt has an ideal voice for Yahoo News,” said Megan Liberman, editor in chief of Yahoo News in a statement.   “He has a singular ability to write about politics in a way that will connect with Yahoo News’ broad readership and bring in younger readers who aren’t always attracted to political commentary. I’m thrilled he is joining us.”

Bai is the latest in a series of high profile new hires for Yahoo News, most recently preceded by New York Times columnist David Pogue, as it continues to build a team of new editorial voices. He will be based in the DC bureau and report to Liberman.

Morning Reading List, 12.21.07

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington. You don’t plan on watching any college football games on New Years Day. And, this morning, Kiefer Sutherland celebrates his 41st birthday sober, and in jail.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The Washington Post put together a quick audio slideshow that deconstructs Barack Obama’s fashion choices. Surfacely it seems that Obama is almost always wearing the same dark suit, and often without a tie. Robin Givhan and Nancy Donaldson look closer to see what these vestments signify. According to them, it shows that Obama is a modern leader, echoing the relaxed but still professional mindset of the American workforce.”

  • John Boehner is a fashion cop for reporters.

  • Bloomberg reports, “The chief executives of Gannett Co. and Media General Inc. personally lobbied top U.S. regulators before winning exceptions to rules that limit newspaper and broadcast ownership in the same markets.”

  • New York Times’ David Pogue explores, “The Generational Divide in Copyright Morality”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “A new era at Tribune Co. began taking shape Wednesday with the departure of Chairman and Chief Executive Dennis FitzSimons and the expected arrival of new leadership under Chicago billionaire Sam Zell. The changing of the guard represents a make-or-break proposition for the 160-year-old media concern, struggling to transform itself for the Internet age by going private in a daring, debt-laden $8.2 billion deal.”

  • We hear the Washington Times tree is back up. The first one had its needles fall off.

  • Washington City Paper reports, “To this day, the Washington Post lives by the guiding principles of fabled publisher Eugene Meyer, who decreed, among other things, the following: ‘As a disseminator of news, the paper shall observe the decencies that are obligatory upon a private gentleman.’ And these days that means not publishing the word ‘dick’ in the Style section.”

  • DCist reports, “Metro fares aren’t the only thing going up in price in D.C. If you’re in the habit of purchasing a copy of the Washington Post from a vending machine or a sidewalk hawker on your way to work in the morning, take note: the cost of the daily paper is about to go up by 15 cents. The Post’s newsstand price will become 50 cents beginning on Dec. 31. The company cited a decline in the paper’s circulation and advertising revenue as the reason for the increase.”

  • The AP reports, “The National Press Foundation will honor half a dozen journalists at its 25th anniversary dinner in February.”

  • The New York Times reports,Claudia Payne, special sections editor, is answering reader questions Dec. 18-21. Questions may be e-mailed to askthetimes@nytimes.com.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Editors at the Associated Press have picked the year’s top 10 stories, and we expected the presidential campaign to be like, you know, top five or something, right? Well, it lands in at #8 — coincidentally one spot ahead of the immigration debate.”

  • Drudge reports, “McCain Pleads with NY Times to Spike Story”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper publisher McClatchy Co. said Thursday revenue fell 9.2 percent in November, primarily from a sharp drop in classified ads as jobs and real estate listings continue to migrate online.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday, December 16, 2007, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ posted 3.12 million total viewers, the program’s best total viewer delivery since the week of February 4, 2007. In addition, ‘This Week’ increased the most of the Sunday discussion programs among Total Viewers compared to last year, a significant 28%.”

  • Also from ABC: “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of December 10, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ beat CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Adults 25-54 for the third week in a row. The last time ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ three weeks in a row in the demo was May 1995.”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, December 16, 2007. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.205 million total viewers.”

  • “CNN and NBC/MSNBC have released their coverage plans for the Iowa Caucus, Thursday Jan. 3.” Check out the full details at TVNewser.

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN will air a Special **LIVE** ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE, Sunday, December 23rd at Noon (ET), and will re-air in the normal Road to the White House timeslots of 6:30 & 9:30 pm”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News Sunday Morning continues as the #1 Sunday morning news program, and it’s growing. Last Sunday the Charles Osgood program drew 5.34M Total Viewers, up 12% year-to-year.”

  • An ABC insider tells us, “Hilarity has ensued at our bureau after a widely attended ‘facebook seminar’ earlier this month. It’s now commonplace to see highly regarded producers and correspondents asking interns about ‘poking’.”

  • USAToday reports, “If you plan to dance at your New Year’s Eve party, you might want to pick up some moves from White House correspondent David Gregory, who boogied this morning to Mary J. Blige music.” Check out the video here.

  • One year after her departure, Kathleen Matthews’ picture has finally been removed from the banner welcoming visitors to WJLA in Rosslyn.

  • Forbes reports, “Despite a growing cadre of viewing alternatives like the Web and repeat-heavy schedules on the broadcast networks, people are still watching television, a new survey finds.”

  • B&C reports, “Hearst-Argyle is taking participatory democracy into the newsroom. The broadcaster is asking viewers and Web surfers to submit videos about the upcoming New Hampshire primary to the station Web sites of its WMUR-TV Manchester, N.H., and WCVB-TV Boston as well as the stations’ YouTube channels.”

  • Check out the latest installment from Green Room Girl.

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Beet TV reported yesterday, “Earlier today I interviewed Cynthia Farrar, the CEO and producer of PurpleStates.TV. Tomorrow, the first of nearly a dozen video segments produced by her new company and reported by non-professional citizen journalists, go up on the Op-Ed pages of the NYTimes.com The videos will be uploaded through February 5, ‘Super Tuesday.’”

  • PolitiFact is a finalist in the prestigious DigitalEdge awards by the Newspaper Association of America for best overall news site along with the Star-Tribune of Minneapolis and washingtonpost.com. You can find out more here.

  • WebProNews reports, “Bloggers from the left, center, and right sides of the political spectrum opened a group blog on Newsweek.com called The Ruckus.”

  • The LCV just launched a new website “calling the Sunday talk show hosts to task for ignoring the issue of global warming.” Check it out here.

  • Hotline’s On Call announced, “check in often between Christmas and New Year’s for On Call’s up-to-date coverage of the presidential contest.”

  • The AP reports, “Antitrust regulators approved Google Inc.’s $3.1 billion purchase of DoubleClick Inc., clearing the way for a formidable combination in the burgeoning online advertising sector. Microsoft Corp. and AT&T Inc. have lobbied heavily against the deal, but the Federal Trade Commission gave it the go-ahead Thursday.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • In the first edition of The Atlantic’s politics roundtable, Marc Ambinder, Ross Douthat, and Matthew Yglesias predict which candidates will win the primaries and debate whether Hillary’s slide is a media fabrication. Check it out here.

  • A reader points out “a notable first for DC: NYMag.com suggests that the DC food scene has something that New York doesn’t. ha.”

  • Starting this week, much of CQ content is now accessible and easy to read on your handheld device. “The new handheld-optimized pages include news stories from CQ Weekly and CQ Today, CQ Transcripts, CQ BillAnalysis and many other services.”

  • Popular Mechanics has published its first ever Geek the Vote — an online guide to all the candidates’ stances on issues related to science and technology including energy policy and climate change, gun control, science education and infrastructure investment. Check it out here.

  • The New Republic reports,Max Brantley, the editor of the alternative weekly Arkansas Times, has feuded with Mike Huckabee since the presidential candidate first appeared on the political stage during his failed 1992 Senate run. A liberal columnist married to a circuit judge appointed by Bill Clinton, Brantley penned weekly columns antagonizing Huckabee for his staunchly conservative social views, opaque campaign finance disclosures, and acceptance of gifts during his time in office. ‘Huckabee would believe I covered him obsessively, and he’d be right about that,’ Brantley says.”

  • The New Republic’s Sean Wilentz writes, “Opinion-slingers are mooning over Barack Obama’s instincts. Don’t they remember how badly that worked out last time?”

  • The Atlantic’s Megan McArdle writes, “the wild, drunken office Christmas party used to be a staple of television, books, and movies. Now I feel as if it’s dropped pretty thoroughly out of the popular imagination; the only example I can think of recently is a fleeting scene in Bridget Jones’ Diary. Were office holiday parties really that much wilder in the past? Or have we just stopped noticing, literarily?”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News and South Carolina ETV Radio (the state’s public radio network) will present an audio-only Republican Presidential Debate, to be broadcast on NPR Member stations and webcast live from 2:00-4:00PM (EST) on Wednesday, January 16. NPR News journalists and hosts Steve Inskeep, Michele Norris and Robert Siegel will act as moderators.”

  • So far, there has been over 3000 comments in response to Bryant Park Project blog post asking Ron Paul supporters to identify themselves.

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Potomac Flacks reports, “Preparing your boss for a MTP appearance isn’t an easy assignment (especially when it’s the full hour)! Many a guest has recruited high-priced talent to do their best Russert in hopes of better preparing for the grilling they will receive on Sunday. Word on the street was that former Bush Administration flack, Adam Levine did the best Russert impersonation in town. Looks as though he has some serious competition after Romney’s appearance last Sunday.”

    Top of post

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that Steve Valentini, the circulation director for Politico, is jumping ship and going over to the Examiner.

  • On Jan. 2, Quin Hillyer is leaving Citizens United to begin work at the editorial page of the Washington Examiner as Associate Editor.

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Director of Business Development, an Editor for Morning Rundown and an Editor for the
    Afternoon Rundown
    .

  • The Daily Progress is looking for an Assistant City Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.13.07

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • Your coworkers shouldn’t expect any gifts from you this year.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Regarding this, a reader writes in, “Other young reporters at the Post, just fyi: Philip Rucker, who just covered the Maryland General Assembly special session, 23. Megan Greenwell, who just returned from Baghdad, 23. Metro reporter Jenna Johnson, 22″

  • The Huffington Post takes on Politico: “Obama Questionaire Exposes Publication’s Bias”

  • The New York Times reports, “In the last few months, Rupert Murdoch has moved into an office at Dow Jones & Company, publisher of The Wall Street Journal. He has pushed the paper’s editors for shorter articles and more hard news. He has personally wooed reporters he wants to keep out of his competitors’ hands. And last week, he oversaw the replacement of top executives, including The Journal’s publisher, with his own lieutenants. And he hasn’t even bought the company yet. That will change on Thursday, when in all likelihood shareholders will vote to approve the sale of Dow Jones to Mr. Murdoch’s company, the News Corporation. But Mr. Murdoch has already seized the reins of Dow Jones and The Journal, setting in motion what amounts to an overhaul of the look, content and staff of one of the world’s most prized newspapers.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission plans to vote next week on rules that would let companies own a newspaper and television station in the same market, defying members of Congress who wanted a delay.”

  • The New York Post reports, “A budding feud is developing between Vanity Fair columnist Michael Wolff and Wall Street Journal reporter Sarah Ellison, both of whom now have book deals to write about Rupert Murdoch and News Corp.’s takeover of Dow Jones.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Wall Street continues to turn sour on media and entertainment stocks heading into 2008, even though several sector biggies already are seeing their stocks near their 52-week lows.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “I’m naming David Halberstam and Norman Mailer, who died in 2007, as my Journalists of the Year.”

  • Regret The Error brings us, “The Year in Media Errors and Corrections”

  • Crains New York reports, “The advertising marketplace really is as gloomy as it looks. Total measured advertising expenditures grew just 0.2% to $108.2 billion in the first nine months of the year, according to TNS Media Intelligence.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • MSNBC will present live coverage of the Des Moines Register Democratic presidential debates tomorrow, as will C-SPAN.

  • TVNewser reports, “CNBC and Yahoo! are getting into the content sharing business. CNBC announced an agreement to distribute video and text stories from CNBC, CNBC Europe, CNBC Asia, and CNBC.com to Yahoo! Finance users in the United States and worldwide.”

  • TV Board writes, “It’s been a while since I’ve contributed a post to this board, and much of that time has been spent thinking about some recent developments taking place at Google, and how they may ultimately reshape the way we plan, buy, watch and think about television. The development that’s had me thinking the most was Google’s deal to license demographic ratings data from Nielsen. This surprised me for several reasons. First and foremost was that I thought the industry was heading in the opposite direction, that demos were doomed, and that it would be Nielsen that would ultimately need to license data from Google — not the other way around.”

  • Check out WETA’s Bethanne Patrick’s recommendations for top titles for the holidays–books to put under the tree, around the menorah, or near the Festivus pole.

  • PRWeek reports, “Talking head Chris Matthews is a former political operative acting as a consultant to news mediaThe day may come when the ‘news’ is an all-out battle of competing political factions, each trying to insinuate its position into the mind of the populace by using the media as a giant host, just as viruses use the human body. Who are we kidding? That day came long ago. But the media does not seem to be in a hurry to discourage the transition.”

  • “FOX News Channel’s E.D. Hill started ‘Operation Holiday Thanks’ this season to deliver holiday greetings to wounded soldiers at various military hospitals around the world. In just a few weeks, Hill has already received 30,000 cards from viewers wanting to send holiday wishes to the soldiers.”

  • A Comcast release announced, “plans to build out a 92,000-square-foot, 500-seat regional call center in Largo, Md. at 1301 McCormick Drive. The new call center will primarily house customer service agents who will provide technical support for Comcast High-Speed Internet (CHSI), Comcast Digital Voice (CDV) and various advanced video products. Comcast currently employs more than 4,000 local employees throughout the Region, supporting the company’s 1.1 million Potomac Region customers.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Wonkette wants to know what you think about the site’s redesign.

  • Reuters reports, “‘w00t,’ an expression of joy coined by online gamers, was crowned word of the year on Tuesday by the publisher of a leading U.S. dictionary. Massachusetts-based Merriam-Webster Inc. said “w00t” — typically spelled with two zeros — reflects a new direction in the American language led by a generation raised on video games and cell phone text-messaging.”

  • Regret The Error brings us, “The Year in Media Errors and Corrections”

  • Romenesko has a lot to offer on the Bacon-Daly situation.

  • Seth Mnookin writes, “Can you hear me now? The Daly fiasco echo chamber, day two.”

  • Information Week reports, “Google accounted for more than six of 10 online searches in the United States in November, more than triple the amount of its closest rival Yahoo, a Web metrics firm said Tuesday.”

  • The Obama story, Perry Bacon and the ‘thin blue line’ of American journalism.”

  • Dotards and Maybe Fools: Bacon Gate Turns Into a Brawl

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Writers Guild of America is under new and mounting pressure from its ranks to get back to the bargaining table. A number of union members are unhappy that the negotiations with the major Hollywood studios that broke off Friday night were sidetracked by issues secondary to the one the writers see as central: how they will be paid when their work shows up on the Internet.”

  • Check out The Rags Show, a blog written by “a written word activist who comes from that not-so-fictional community called Homelesstown USA.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Did you miss US News and World Report’s Ken Walsh on NPR’s On the Media program this weekend? Listen to it here.

    Top of post

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • TVNewser reports,David Pogue, personal technology columnist for The New York Times, is joining CNBC as a contributor.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • LegiStorm is looking for a Project Manager for the LegiStorm Web Site.

  • National Press Foundation is seeking a Program Assistant.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Researcher and a Schedules Researcher.

  • The Atlantic Media Company is looking for a Staff Correspondent to cover the White House for National Journal.

  • The American Prospect is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • Carnegie Endowment is looking for a Web Director.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext