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Posts Tagged ‘Deb Howell’

Morning Reading List, 12.30.08

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 12.01.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Howell: 900 Subscribers Cancelled Washington Post In Past Month, Thanks To Bias

Highlights from Deb Howell‘s weekly ombudsman column:

  • “Thousands of conservatives and even some moderates have complained during my more than three-year term that The Post is too liberal; many have stopped subscribing, including more than 900 in the past four weeks.”

  • “Journalism naturally draws liberals; we like to change the world. I’ll bet that most Post journalists voted for Obama. I did.”

  • WaTimes v. WaPost

    Think the Washington Times harbors a grudge against the Washington Post?

    Exhibit A: Its Nov. 5 story about sold-out newspapers around the country failed to mention the most obvious (and local) example…the Washington Post.

    Exhibit B: It ran a story today on A3 — headline “Post concedes bias for Obama” — reiterating WaPo ombudsman Deb Howell‘s conclusion that the Washington Post’s coverage of the presidential campaign tilted in favor of Sen. Barack Obama.

    (Side note: One tipster thinks that this weekend’s Washington Post magazine piece on health care looks awfully similar to a Washington Times piece from a month ago. You decide.)

    Deb Howell’s Column About Copy Editors Could Have Typos In It

    Wrote Washington Post ombudsman Deb Howell in an internal posting on the WaPo’s messaging system at 8:08pm last night:

      I intend to write a column soon on copy editors, which appear to be a vanishing breed in the newspaper business — something that worries me greatly. I would appreciate any anecdotes or anything else that would be helpful.

    Wrote Washington Post ombudsman Deb Howell in an internal posting on the WaPo’s messaging system at 8:41pm last night:

      The bells tolls for me. Vince Rinehart just noted that my note said copy editors, which. Sted copy editors, who. Arg.
      Couldn’t live without Vince or the editorial copy desk, who clean me up every week.

    Morning Reading List, 02.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Most of you don’t even wear a watch anymore.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • John Hendren and Jose Antonio Vargas shared a birthday this weekend.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, said fourth-quarter profit declined 31 percent as advertisers cut holiday spending and its television stations sold fewer political ads.”

  • The AP reports, “The board of directors of The Associated Press gave final approval to a new pricing plan Thursday that will overhaul how the news cooperative’s services are packaged and sold to its newspaper members. The changes, which received initial approval from the board in October, will result in about $6 million in savings to AP’s newspaper members when they take effect Jan. 1, 2009, the company said in a statement.”

  • Press duels with Obama over access

  • Politico reports, “With presidential candidates dropping like flies, the television networks are pouring more resources into covering the most famous non-candidate on the campaign trail: Bill Clinton. Now, all the major players — NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox and CNN — have producers on the President Clinton beat, most joining within the past two weeks.”

  • Silicon Alley Insider reports, “When News Corp. bought Dow Jones and the Wall Street Journal last year, part of the rationale was that Rupert Murdoch could use the WSJ’s reporters to help bolster its fledgling Fox Businesss Network — but not for a while. That’s because the WSJ and GE’s CNBC had already signed a contract that gives the cable network the exclusive rights to the Journal’s talent through 2012. Or not. Fox Business now looks set on exploiting what it says is a loophole in the CNBC deal: Fox Business Network EVP Kevin Magee says he thinks he can use WSJ reporters and editors, after all.”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “A Jan. 7 essay on Jewish identity, published on washingtonpost.com’s popular On Faith site, caused a furor and led to two public apologies, a lost job and much recrimination.”

  • New York Times’ readers react to William Kristol.

  • Dan Steinberg writes, “When I saw Dan Hellie walk into the media room this morning looking like he had just taken a few crosses to his temple, I immediately thought…..well, you all can guess what I thought. But no, it turns out Hellie was headbutted yesterday while playing pick-up hoops in Bethesda. The wound required 14 stitches to patch up.”

  • A release announced, “The Los Angeles Times editorial board has endorsed Senator John McCain and Senator Barack Obama in this year’s presidential primary election, marking the first such endorsement since 1972.” Check out the full endorsement here.

  • AlterNet’s Nick Bromell writes, “At some point in our lives, we all dream of playing in the big leagues. But what if our fantasies came true? What if we were suddenly plucked from our crabgrass and dead clover and dropped magically onto the emerald outfield of Yankee Stadium? What would we feel — ecstasy or terror? I suspect that something like this happened to David Brooks when he was summoned from the obscure nook of the Weekly Standard and asked to write a regular op-ed column for the New York Times. Here was someone who had edited a cranky right-wing journal and written a clever book poking fun at baby-boomer bohemians suddenly being required to render informed opinion on everything from global warming to stem-cell research. Is it any wonder that for the past three years we have watched a drowning man flounder in a froth of chatty drivel?Fortunately, his legions of exasperated readers don’t have to wonder whether he’ll ever get his just reward. The truth is that Brooks is already being punished. Deep beneath his protective sheath of psychic blubber, he knows what the Wizard of Oz knew — that he’s a fake and a failure.”

  • Washington Whispers reports on one journo’s opinion of Sen. Barack Obama. “Another reporter, Chicago Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet, has worked out beside the candidate and describes him as ‘studious and serious, thorough and businesslike.’”

  • Khaled Hosseini writes in the Wall Street Journal, “Ever since the post-9/11 American invasion, the Afghan government has taken great pains to distance itself from the oppressive and unforgiving rule of the Taliban. Afghan leaders have pointed to greater personal freedom and improvements in infrastructure, education and health care as successes of the country’s nascent democracy. But last week we learned that Sayed Parwez Kaambakhsh, a young journalism student, has been sentenced to death for distributing an article that, religious clerics in Afghanistan say, violates the tenets of Islam.”

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    TV

  • A Clinton campaign release announced, “veteran journalist Carole Simpson will serve as moderator for Hillary’s Voices Across America: A National Town Hall. The three-time Emmy award winner will join Hillary at the anchor event in New York. The town hall will be broadcast live on Hallmark Channel and online on the eve of Super Tuesday, Monday, February 4, 2008 at 9 p.m. EST.”

  • A release announced, “The Comcast Network on Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. as CN8 Political Director Lynn Doyle hosts a special three-hour edition of ‘It’s Your Call,’ featuring live, expert analysis of Super Tuesday and the 24 state primary elections taking place that day. The coverage follows CN8′s launch of ‘America’s Next President,’ the network’s most expansive election package to date tracking all major events leading up to the presidential election.”

  • ABC’s David Muir sat down with Sen. Barack Obama. The interview aired this weekend on ABC’s World News Saturday.

  • TVNewser reports, “In addition to coverage on BBC World News America, CNN International and Euro News, MSNBC is getting into the international game this Super Tuesday. NBC has signed an agreement with Channel NewsAsia to carry the network’s coverage from 6pmET Tuesday night to 6amET Wednesday morning.”

  • TVNewser reports, “From politics to parties; from Hooters girls to the President of the United States, FNC’s two hours on the Fox broadcast network this morning accomplished what it set out to do: ‘explore the social impact of the Super Bowl and how it intertwines with politics.’ That line from the press release is about as dry as the Arizona desert. Fox Super Sunday, however, was more exciting.”

  • B&C reports, “Nobody was happier to see John Edwards drop out of the presidential race last week than CNN. That’s because it set up what many Americans—and CNN—wanted to see last Thursday: a one-on-one debate between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. And while the debate didn’t turn into the slugfest many expected, it set the stage for a riveting Super Tuesday matchup between the top Democratic candidates.”

  • The Guardian reports, “Al-Jazeera’s troubled English language news channel is facing a ‘serious staffing crisis’ after scores of journalists left or have not had contracts renewed amid claims of a revolt over working conditions.”

  • From B&C, check out “some thoughts, notes and quotes that didn’t make it into this week’s Left Coast Bias column on spending the day with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer at Thursday’s Democratic debate at the Kodak Theater in Los Angeles.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Last December, conservative author and CNN election analyst William J. Bennett gave over two thousand dollars to Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaign, a fact that Bennett has not mentioned during any of his appearances on the network, according to a review of transcripts by the Huffington Post.”

  • TVNewser reports, Jon Stewart’s take on The Situation Room’s multitude of monitors, with a special appearance from Spongebob.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS and ABC joined Fox to ask the Supreme Court not to review a lower-court decision that essentially took the Federal Communications Commission to the woodshed for failing to justify its crackdown on fleeting profanity.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipster tells us about a situation in New Hampshire (which seems like a really long time ago, now) during the coverage of the primary there. MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was talking with a New Hampshire politician about the state of things in Washington. Matthews told the local pol, ‘Nothing will get done in Washington until there is a large enough majority in the Senate — maybe I’ll run for Senate.’ After explaining he was from Pennsylvania, Matthews said, ‘Casey pulled it off so it’s do-able.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox News Channel ends January with 8 of the top 10 programs. CNN’s Larry King Live (8th) and Lou Dobbs Tonight (10th) filled out the top 10. MSNBC’s highest rated show Countdown with Keith Olbermann came in 19th.”

  • CNN Dem Debate Most Watched in Cable History

  • His Extreme-ness wrote last week, “Send Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton to the freedom of speech woodshed. Boy, did they exhibit a fundamental misunderstanding of C-SPAN during last night’s debate”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is going to begin Super Tuesday coverage a couple hours early” on Monday night. “The Super Tuesday preview will be anchored by Dan Abrams from 10-11pmET, and by Norah O’Donnell and David Shuster from 11-Midnight.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reid Wilson’s birthday was Saturday!

  • “KassyK” is leaving D.C.

  • Radar Online reports, “One of the joys of the presidential campaign season is that it allows the Washington press corps to ignore even more substantive stories than usual. With so many reporters detached to the campaign trail, dozens of big stories are either left to the wire services or ignored altogether. Last week the press buried two big stories about how many times the Bush administration has lied in public, and how it has covered up those lies in private. They belonged on the front page.”

  • Salon’s Joe Conason asks, “Will the press get over its love for McCain?”

  • AlterNet reports, James Glassman, the nominee for Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy, probably won’t have much of an impact on how the United States presents itself to the rest of the world. For one thing, he’ll only have 11 months in the post. For another — as his predecessor Karen Hughes proved — putting shinier lipstick on the pig of U.S. foreign policy doesn’t do much to assuage widespread anti-American sentiment. Still, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s January 30 hearing on Glassman’s nomination provided some insight into Washington’s evolving view of public diplomacy.”

  • A release announced, “ABC News NOW’s wall-to-wall coverage of the Super Tuesday Presidential primaries and caucuses will be available LIVE on the Homepage and the Politics section of ABCNEWS.com. Coverage will begin on Tuesday, February 5 at 7:00 p.m., ET and continue through at least 12:15 a.m., ET to report results across all time zones, including California, where polls close at 11:00 p.m., ET.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “As j-schools struggle to keep the skills they teach relevant to the fast-changing media landscape, hundreds other journalists and students have mobilized to teach and support each other informally through a new online social network. Wired Journalists was recently created by Ryan Sholin of GateHouse Media, using Ning (a free set of tools for rolling your own social network). As of this morning, the group has 778 members. Many of them appear to be 20-somethings (j-school students or recent grads) — but there are some gray-hairs there, as well as some notable luminaries from the field.”

  • For Super Tuesday, washingtonpost.com will have six hours of live online-only video coverage and analysis of the results as they come in.

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    MAGAZINES

  • Media Life reports, “Magazine publishing in the U.S. may have become gloomy for certain categories, but worldwide it’s in healthy shape, with emerging markets making up for the slowdowns in mature markets like the U.S. And the picture for magazines worldwide looks brighter still going forward, even if they’re not seeing anywhere the growth in ad revenue as the internet. Worldwide ad spending on magazines grew 2.7 percent in 2007, and that pace is forecast to pick up to 3.4 percent a year through 2010.”

  • Newsweek is “Catching Up With ‘Obama Girl’”

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    RADIO

  • All Forgiven, WIMUS-AM Is on a Roll

  • A release announced, “XM Satellite Radio and SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT today announced that they have resolved the lawsuit brought by SONY BMG against XM over its Pioneer Inno, a portable satellite radio with advanced recording features. The companies did not disclose terms of the deal.”

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    BOOKS

  • Boston Globe reports, “Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Co. is laying off employees in Boston and other offices as it consolidates some of its operations in the wake of its $4 billion acquisition of Harcourt Education, Harcourt Trade, and Greenwood-Heinemann from Reed Elsevier.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes,Craig Silverman’s devotion to the correction as a literary form dates to 2004, when the Montreal-based writer launched his Web site Regret the Error, which traps and displays journalism’s best (and funniest) corrections, retractions, apologies, and clarifications. Silverman’s essential site spawned an equally essential book last fall titled Regret the Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech, which tells you everything you need to know about the history of journalistic fallibility and the culture of corrections.”

  • The New York Times reports, “A federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to a reporter of The New York Times, apparently to try to force him to reveal his confidential sources for a 2006 book on the Central Intelligence Agency, one of the reporter’s lawyers said Thursday. The subpoena was delivered last week to the New York law firm that is representing the reporter, James Risen, and ordered him to appear before a grand jury in Alexandria, Va., on Feb. 7.”

  • A Friday release from the ACLU announced, “After reports that a federal grand jury issued a subpoena to New York Times reporter James Risen last week in an attempt to force disclosure of a confidential source, the American Civil Liberties Union today strongly objected to the subpoena, saying that basic First Amendment principles are at stake when reporters are called into the courtroom against their will. According to reports, a chapter in Mr. Risen’s book on the Central Intelligence Agency, ‘State of War,’ piqued the interest of the Justice Department and consequently he has been ordered to appear before the grand jury next week.”

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    JOBS

  • Children’s National Medical Center is looking for a PR and Marketing Specialist.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • Virilion, Inc. is looking for an Account Director.

  • The Gazette is looking for a sports reporter.

  • JBS International, Inc. is looking for Writer/Editors.

  • The Baltimore Examiner is offering Photo and Writing Internships.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Reporter, Budget & Appropriations and a Managing Editor, CongressDaily PM.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a News Editor, CQ Today.

  • USATODAY.com is looking for an Ambitious Digital Designer, a Design Developer and a Digital Storyteller.

  • The Martinsville Bulletin is looking for a News Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.15.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Wikipedia. (See King’s Wikipedia entry here.)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Hillary Clinton was “edgy” on “Meet”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “Gannett Co. Inc. has named the chief executive of online ad company PointRoll Inc. to be its new chief digital officer, as it seeks to expand its online operations. Chris Saridakis, who was named PointRoll chief executive after McLean-based Gannett acquired the company two years ago, will oversee digital operations at Gannett’s newspapers and television stations. He will report directly to Gannett chief executive Craig Dubow.”

  • J. Peter Freire is the new Managing Editor of The American Spectator. Freire first came to the Spectator as an intern and editorial assistant under a journalism fellowship from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The real Dowd scandal

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “Here’s what happened in New Hampshire: Reporters lost their natural skepticism and took what they thought was happening and projected it far past the facts. The experts were wrong, the polling a disaster. The Post, luckily, didn’t poll late in New Hampshire and wasn’t among those making a bad call.”

  • The Virginian-Pilot’s Joyce Hoffman writes, “Coming on board as public editor with the news that Landmark Communications, and with it The Virginian-Pilot, is likely to be sold is a daunting endeavor. An end to the century-old tradition of leadership by a family with a historic commitment to public service journalism is a troubling prospect for Hampton Roads.”

  • Richard Just writes, “What happened at the Supreme Court 20 years ago tomorrow has been long forgotten by most Americans — if they ever heard about it at all. Unlike the better-known decisions of the last century, the ruling handed down on Jan. 13, 1988, had nothing to do with race or abortion rights. It didn’t become fodder for presidential candidates and hasn’t galvanized voters on either the left or right. Yet over the past two decades, the court’s ruling in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which concerned high school newspapers, has had far-reaching consequences. Not only has it changed the way journalism is taught at many schools, it has made it more difficult for high school students to learn the important lessons about democracy that come from publishing — or simply reading — serious newspapers.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special live coverage
    … of the Michigan primary, as well as the Democratic presidential debate live from Nevada. Coverage begins with ‘Hardball with
    Chris Matthews’ live from Las Vegas at 5 and 7 p.m. ET, ‘Tucker’ live at 6 p.m. ET and ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • A CNN release announced the network “will dedicate the 8 p.m. hour each weekday to the latest election news coverage from the campaign trail in a new program, CNN Election Center. Building on CNN’s successes and ratings wins from both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, CNN Election Center will be anchored by members of the ‘Best Political Team on Television’ from the New York-based CNN Election Center and on the trail by CNN anchor John Roberts.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Broadcasting & Cable published an editorial today that served as a call to the networks to focus more energy on presidential news coverage. It also applauded ABC News for its debate coverage, which rated extremely well, and its New Hampshire special, which didn’t, but was the only network that gave the primary a half-hour.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “A legal battle over advertisements for a new documentary about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton illustrates the folly of current campaign-finance laws, says the attorney for the producers of the film, which premieres tonight in Washington. ‘Hillary: The Movie’ is ‘a political documentary like Michael Moore or Al Gore has made,’ said James Bopp, who went to federal court last week to represent the movie’s producers. Yet the conservative group Citizens United, which produced the Clinton film, must ‘go to court to get permission to advertise the film… because of McCain-Feingold,’ he said.”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “If you saw John Kerry on ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ Sunday morning, you saw him talking about his endorsement of Barack Obama. And you probably also saw him successfully pull off a tough stunt — banning something he didn’t want from the show.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rep. Ron Paul took part in last Thursday’s GOP debate on Fox News after being excluded in the New Hampshire forum. His supporters were, well, less than happy with Fox News over the decision to leave out Paul from the N.H. forum, as Frank Luntz explained.”

  • TVNewser reports that MSNBC announced in a press release how it plans to handle hosting a debate and covering the Michigan primary tonight. The debate will take place at 9 p.m.
  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler writes, “The press, the pundits and the polls all got a big black eye this week after forecasting, with considerable certainty, a big victory for Sen. Barack Obama in the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. Much has already been written and broadcast about this episode. Newspapers and television networks have had stories about how everybody got it wrong and what the various reasons may have been. I don’t have much to add to this other than to wonder if individual news organizations — aside from their obvious, next-day follow-up stories — took some time to conduct their own in-house post-mortems to figure out if this glaring error in polling and news judgment should alter in some fundamental way the manner in which they approach political coverage. It’s not as though it hasn’t happened before.”

  • This Wednesday at Nathan’s Q&A cafe will feature Amy Holmes, described as “a three-fer: female, black and republican. There’s not much we won’t be able to politically slice and dice.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Hotline’s On Call is covering the Michigan primary live tonight.

  • Poynter’s Steve Klein reports, “No one has been more supportive of bloggers and more critical of mainstream media than Ted Leonsis, the former AOL executive who owns the NHL Washington Capitals. (OK, well maybe Mark Cuban is close.) Leonsis has paid to send independent bloggers to cover Caps prospects in Russia, and when long-time Washington Times hockey writer Dave Fay died late last year, no one was kinder. So when Leonsis shelled out $124 million over 13 years last week to keep his franchise player, Alex Ovechkin, in town — it was the biggest contract in Washington D.C. sports history — Leonsis had a right to expect some accurate coverage in the MSM and some honest passion from the bloggers. But to read the owner’s very active blog, Ted’s Take, it doesn’t appear he got a great deal of either.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Watch reports that Hitchens has quit smoking. No, really.

  • Be sure to c heck out Breitbart TV. Ed Driscoll reports, “About a minute into the latest B-Cast by Liz Stephans and Scott Baker of Breitbart.TV (whom we interviewed a few weeks ago on PJM Political), they casually mention that their previous show attracted about 400,000 views.”

  • Marc Fisher reports, “Living in a city without a full-time jazz station, I have to rely on CDs and downloads to hear my fill of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. But to discover new jazz from singer Madeleine Peyroux or pianist Bruce Barth, it’s necessary to reach past broadcast radio to online music services, music blogs and pay satellite radio. But now comes NPR Music, a sprawling Web site from National Public Radio on which I can listen to the NPR jazz (or classical or folk or indie rock) shows that don’t air on Washington’s public stations — as well as tap into song lists, video and audio of concerts, music-related stories from NPR’s news shows and a raft of programs from public stations across the country.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Wonkette reports, “Campaigns & Elections magazine was one of those old insider trade magazines for people that simply couldn’t get enough of campaign tactics and other campaigners in the off-season — but there’s nary an off-season anymore. So, C&E redesigned the magazine (it’s shiny!), started writing about politics and threw a swanky party with an open bar in a big black room to celebrate.” For pics, click here.

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    RADIO

  • Former CBS Public Eye editor Matthew Felling is hosting “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today at noon on WAMU 88.5, talking Macs and Movies.

  • The Redskins’ Tumultuous Season Didn’t Gain Yardage on Sports Radio

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    JOBS

  • CommunicationWorks is looking for a Media Manager.

  • mediabistro.com is looking for mediabistro.com Instructors.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for an Account Manager and a Senior Associate/Assistant Vice President.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • WFED Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor — AARP Bulletin.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer/Washington Bureau.

  • Strauss Radio Strategies, Inc. is seeking PR Pros Specializing in Broadcast.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Publisher and a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.07.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | JOBS

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Tom Carter is leaving The Washington Times to become communications director at the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.

  • Jessica Brady is joining Roll Call’s as the new features writer.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Jack Shafer writes, “Media scholar Ben Compaine tells me he thinks the Wall Street Journal has begun to reflect the journalistic philosophy of genocidal tyrant Rupert Murdoch, who completed his acquisition of its parent company, Dow Jones & Co., in the middle of December.”

  • Eat The Press alerts us that, “Bill Kristol’s first column is up at the NYT.”

  • CJR revisits “Checkbook Journalism”

  • E&P’s Steve Outing writes, “What’s Needed in 2008: Serious Newsroom Cultural Change”

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “For as long as newspapers have existed, readers have complained that they focus on the negative and critical. Journalists tend to blow that off: That’s what’s news. But when readers are negative toward The Post or its journalists, they often are met with what former Post executive editor Ben Bradlee called ‘the defensive crouch.’ My new year’s resolution for journalists is: Suck it up and forget the abuse. My resolution for angry readers is: Don’t assume malevolence on the part of the reporter or the paper when mistakes are made. Most transgressions are caused by human error or ignorance.”

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ is the number one evening newscast of 2007 among Total Viewers (8.39 million), Adults 25-54 (2.58 million), and Households (5.8 rating). This marks the ABC broadcast’s first yearly win in Total Viewers and the demo since 1996.”

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of December 24-30, 2007.”

  • Fox announced, “Thursday night’s Iowa caucus translated into big ratings for the cable news networks. According to Nielsen Media Research, FOX News Channel came away with the ratings victory among all viewers and in the key demographic (25-54) as compared to the other cable news networks.”

  • A release announced, “Decision 2008: Before You Vote, a partnership of Leadership Florida, the Florida Press Association and the Florida Public Broadcasting Service, Inc., released credentialing information today for the upcoming Florida Decision 2008 Republican Presidential Candidate Debate that it will host at Florida Atlantic University on Thursday, January 24. The debate will be held in the Carole and Barry Kaye Auditorium on the campus of Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton from 9:00 to 11:00 p.m ET. The debate will be produced by NBC News and broadcast on MSNBC and Florida Public Television from 9:00 to 11:00 p.m.”

  • A special moment between Chris Matthews and Sen. Clinton.

  • Dan Rather discussed how he would look at a settlement should CBS offer him one to drop his lawsuit against the network in an interview with FOX Business Network’s Neil Cavuto. Rather said: “I certainly would look at it, that’s not to say whether we would accept it or not. I want the truth to come out about this, and if the truth reflects badly on me when we get to discovery and find out what really happened in this case, then so be it.”

  • TVNewser reports,Mike Wallace, in a rare appearance on 60 Minutes, and Chris Wallace in a rare appearance live on a Sunday night, were both on the air at the same time tonight. Because of the late running NFL playoff game, Mike Wallace’s interview with Roger Clemens on 60 Minutes did not air until 8:20pmET. Over on Fox News, his son, Chris Wallace was 20 minutes into moderating the GOP forum.”

  • Check out Tracey Neale’s farewell from News 9.

  • TVNewser has some interesting tidbits from the Iowa Caucus ratings.

  • NewHour announced, “Jim Lehrer hosts a special half hour broadcast at 11pm, Tuesday, January 8, 2008 with coverage of the New Hampshire primary. Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff will be reporting from the field in New Hampshire. Jim Lehrer will get analysis and perspective from political analysts Stuart Rothenberg and Amy Walter; presidential historians Michael Beschloss and Richard Norton Smith; and NewsHour regulars Mark Shields and David Brooks.”

  • Check out the Reuters pic of a Secret Service agent coming between Bill O’Reilly and Obama staffer Marvin Nicholson. For more details on what caused this, click here.

  • TVNewser asks, “Is CNN Trying To “Stick It To Fox” By Re-Airing ABC’s Debates?”

  • NewsHour announced that the show’s story on Food Safety has won a Golden Cine award. “Betty Ann Bowser headed a team that included Producer Tony Van Witsen, Associate Producer Katie Mulik and Reporter Mike Melia. Additional material was contributed by Producer Saul Gonzalez and Correspondent Lee Hochberg.”

  • B&C reports, “Attention, national and local news operations: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) regulation 23 CFR 634 goes into effect Nov. 24. So what? It requires workers on or near public highways to wear high-visibility safety clothes on the job. … This means that starting in the fall, there will be no more reporters in camel-hair overcoats and stylish parkas doing those winter stand-ups on traffic and weather along any public roadway — at least not without day-glow vests, reflective tape or other approved safety gear, as well.”

  • 23/6 reports, “Media outlets can’t resist screwing with Mike Huckabee’s name. Like bugs to those lamps that kill bugs, they flock, desperate to bask in the glow of their own wit. While FOX News was the only outlet to use the candidate’s name in lieu of a dirty word, The Atlantic coined Huckenfreude and Drudge went with Huckaboom. New York Magazine went all Brangelina on him with Huckabuchanan and the blogs spread Huckahunt, Aw Shucks-a-bee, and Huckabust like gonnorrhea at the University of Miami.”

  • Journal-isms reports, “The nation’s news media appear to be inching toward greater diversity in their campaign coverage teams as the Iowa caucuses take place Thursday and the first-in-the-nation New Hampshire presidential primary follows on Tuesday. Nearly all of the major news organizations contacted by Journal-isms on Wednesday could cite at least one journalist of color who would be part of the coverage — braving that little matter of the weather.”

  • The Feed reports, “In The Age of Obama, Media Diversity Takes Some Hits”

  • A tipster asks, “MSNBC’s promo for Joe Scarborough says he was a member of Congress from 1994-2001. He was elected in 1994. But wasn’t sworn in until 1995. Shouldn’t Joe know that?”

  • The ABC News/WMUR/Facebook presidential debates for both Republicans and Democrats took place last night. Charlie Gibson moderated.

  • Check out some pics from the FOX News’ forum in New Hampshire here.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Poynter Online reports, How the “FOIA Reforms Help Journos, Bloggers”

  • Hitwise News reports, “Top 10 News and Media Category Websites Ranked By US Market Share of Visits”

  • Jack Shafer writes, “In praise of booze in the newsroom.”

  • Pajamas Media reports, Scott Horton’s smearing of the U.S. military is a swamp of dubious sources and hidden agendas, writes PJM’s Bob Owens. A fresh look at the Harper’s blogger reveals that his conflicts of interest run even deeper than previously thought.”

  • Don’t miss the Mediabistro party at The Park at Fourteenth on Tuesday, January 22, enjoying drinks and complimentary appetizers. For more info, click here.

  • Instapundit reports, “Blogger Andrew Olmsted has died in Iraq.”

  • John Dickerson writes, “You know when a celebrity television personality like Bill O’Reilly arrives at a political event because they always have a retinue and because people turn their cameras and camera phones from the candidate to capture the famous face. When the popular Fox News entertainer arrived at the Obama event in Nashua, people turned to him but not always approvingly. ‘Hey O’Reilly,’ yelled a man. When O’Reilly turned he got a single finger salute. A few people approached Bill to shake his hand but the overwhelming sentiment was not favorable. ‘O’Reilly hate monger,’ yelled a woman. A few other people gave him the bird. ‘I hate you Bill,’ yelled a man. ‘You can’t stop us Bill,’ yelled another. I thought someone might brain him with one of those Obama hope signs.”

  • A release announced, “Brent Bozell claims in his newest release, Whitewash: What the Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will, that the media has succumbed to the pressure by the Clinton forces, going so far as to bury stories that might damage her presidential chances. But has it? To find out, the National Press Club has invited Bozell for a discussion of his new book in an open forum on January 10 at 6:30 p.m.”

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    RADIO

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. government antitrust lawyers have spent nearly 10 months so far investigating Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s plan to acquire rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc, despite company hopes that the deal would be approved by the end of 2007.”

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    JOBS

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for a Writer/Editor and a Financial Services Reporter.

  • Government Executive is looking for a Senior Editor.

  • Politico/Politico.com is looking for a National Account Executive.

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Senior Editor, North America.

  • The Magazine Group is looking for an Account Manager, Circulation.

  • Foreign Policy is looking for a Media & PR Coordinator.

  • The (Annapolis) Capital is looking for a sportswriter.

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Construction News Reporter.

  • Science News is looking for a Circulation Manager.

  • Argus Media is looking for a Power & fuels reporter.

  • Express/The Washington Post Co. is looking for an Assistant Art Director.

  • FierceMarkets, Inc. is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Staff Writer/Suffolk Public Safety.

  • American Academy of Physician Assistants is looking for a Reporter/Editor.

  • Patuxent Publishing is looking for a Reporter and a General Assignment Reporter.

  • USA Weekend Magazine is looking for Freelance Copy Editors and Fact-Checkers.

  • The News Virginian is looking for a News Ace.

  • Inside Washington Publishers is looking for Print and online reporters.

  • The Washington Times is seeking a Talented Copy Editor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Production Assistant, Tell Me More, an Editorial Assistant, Tell Me More, and an Associate Editor, Tell Me More.

  • National Association of Broadcasting is looking for a Media Relations Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.27.07

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • Most of you spent more than $400 on holiday presents.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “In the beleaguered newspaper industry, one chief executive has long stood out as the golden boy: Gary Pruitt. He skillfully managed the McClatchy Co. chain and last year engineered the $4.6 billion takeover of Knight Ridder Inc., one of the largest in the history of the business.”

  • Following our item yesterday, FishbowlDC heard from Post ombudsman Deb Howell, who confirmed that she’s staying at the Post for a third year.

  • In case you were wondering, “Fishwrap vs. Fishbowl” — there is no connection.

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “OOPS: A reporter was kept off Clinton’s press charter today because the reporter didn’t have her ID.”

  • The New York Times reports, Sylvan Fox, the first ‘rewrite man’ to be singled out for a Pulitzer Prize, died on Saturday at New York University Medical Center. Mr. Fox, who also worked as a reporter and editor for The New York Times, was 79 and lived in Manhattan.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Free news online will cost journalism dearly”

  • Check out Omnivoracious’ “Reviewing the Reviewers

  • WTOP’s Mark Segraves will start writing a monthly column for Hill Rag papers, the first one will be in January.

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    TV

  • From DCRTV:

      Yes, that’s DC TV and radio veteran Frank Herzog (right) in the new “National Treasure 2: Book Of Secrets” movie. The current WTOP news anchor, who used to be the radio voice of the Redskins and a sports anchor at Channels 9 and 7, appears with star Nicolas Cage, who is talking to the president, played by Bruce Greenwood, at his birthday party at Mount Vernon. As they are looking at a map at George Washington’s home, Herzog walks up and says: “Happy Birthday, Mr. President,” and the president says: “Thanks, Frank.” Also, Herzog played a dance contest judge in 2006′s “Step Up,” which was filmed in Baltimore…..

  • The Washington Times reports, “The Federal Communications Commission doesn’t need a procedural overhaul, despite criticism from Capitol Hill as well as commission Democrats, Commissioner Robert M. McDowell told reporters last week.”

  • The AP reports, “The Republican chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is disputing Democratic assertions that a new rule loosening restrictions on media ownership is full of loopholes and will lead to a wave of mergers and fewer choices for consumers.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is back in Washington for Hardball, but he began his day in New York, guesting on Morning Joe, sans Scarborough. As Willie Geist and Mika Brzezinski were thanking Chris for his appearance he jumped in and gave a classic Matthews yelp. ‘This is the greatest show in the morning. This is better than Imus! Haaaa.’”

  • Inside Cable News is just wondering — is this TMI?

  • A release announced, “Reuters/C-SPAN/Zogby daily tracking polls in Iowa kick off today with one of the most competitive presidential elections in modern history just around the corner. This partnership brings together the biggest and the best in the news and polling industries, teaming up Reuters – one of the largest news agencies in the world — with one of the most renowned pollsters in the world, and C-SPAN, the groundbreaking source for news about our federal government.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Romney Takes Break From Bird-Flapping to Call Out Carl Cameron”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABC will be setting aside a Saturday night of entertainment programming next week and will air back-to-back Republican and Democratic candidate debates. Moderated by ABC’s Charles Gibson, the debates will take place in New Hampshire Saturday, Jan. 5 and are being produced in conjunction with Facebook and WMUR-TV. During the debates, Facebook users will be able to participate in groups, which will ‘provide a companion to the televised debates.’”

  • Huffington Post reports,Chris Matthews Imitates Vampires, Flunks Geography”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Talking Points Memo reports, “Bill Clinton Was Kinda Right, Media Is Obsessed With Horse-Race And Is Toughest On Hillary.” (Hat Tip Playbook)

  • Huffington Post’s Jay Rosen writes, “The Hill Restores Armstrong Williams to Legitimacy. Why?”

  • Machinist presents, “The year in technology”

  • A reader writes in, “DUUUUDE!!! That was the most unhappiest of ‘happy hour’ clips of all time. Thanks for sending me into a dark hole of despair for Christmas, Gavin!!” Whoops.

  • The Seattle Times reports, “When Jim Romenesko isn’t running the premier Web page about journalism-industry news, he is monitoring two other subjects: unusual news stories at ObscureStore.com and the world’s largest coffee-shop chain at StarbucksGossip.com.”

  • CBS’ Chip Reid shares, “Five Things I Learned in Ten Days With Edwards”

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    RADIO

  • News Busters reports, “Once again, those class-warring liberals are organizing a luxury cruise. This time, it’s National Public Radio talk show host Diane Rehm.” For more info, click here.

  • WTOP reports, “When President Bush appeared with D.C. firefighters after the fire at the Old Executive Office Building, it wasn’t by chance. Not that anybody thought it was, but it wasn’t orchestrated by the West Wing press office either. It was the brain child of D.C. Fire and EMS spokesperson Alan Etter.”

  • In the latest installment of Blogs The Famous Media Reads, His Extremeness presents XM’s Rebecca Roberts.

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    JOBS

  • Bisnow on Business is seeking a smart, experienced and energetic editor.

  • The New Republic is looking for reporter-researchers for the 2008-2009 internship program.

  • The Society of American Florists has a great job for a newbie writer-editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Deb Howell: Sticking Around

    Best we can tell, Washington Post ombudsman Deb Howell has had her two year contract with the Washington Post extended. She was given a two-year contract and started in 2005. This could mean that, since she’s still writing for the paper more than two years later, perhaps her contract was extended? The original deal gave her a two year gig with an option to extend it for one year.

    We tried to ask Ms. Howell — being that her job is to answer reader mail and all — but emails to both her and Len Downie went unreturned.

    What do readers think of this extension for Howell?

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