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Posts Tagged ‘Deborah Howell’

Morning Reading List, 08.11.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 07.28.08

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Good morning Washington.

At what D.C. restaurant/lounge was the above photo taken? Let us know.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 07.21.08

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Good morning Washington.
What PR flak didn’t have much luck with the above chair last week? Let us know.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 04.15.08

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Happy Tax Day Washington. Playbook tells us that “Patrick Henry, Ed’s son, is 7.” Here’s your TV coverage of the Pope’s visit. Here’s the full text of Sen. John McCain’s remarks to the AP annual meeting yesterday. Sen. Hillary Clinton speaks today. And be sure to check out TVNewser’s ongoing coverage of the 2008 NAB-RTNDA conference in Las Vegas.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

  • You think Obama’s bitter comment was totally overblown.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because I just had a great job interview at a paper that has an actual functioning newsroom, with good editors who get to the root of the community’s problems. So, why am I angry? They can’t afford to pay me as much as the crappy paper I’m working at now. Damn IT!”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported on Saturday, “Caroline H. Little stepped down yesterday as chief executive and publisher of Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive (WPNI), the company announced.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe reports, “The Internet is up, the newspaper business is down, so no one would expect the top people at the Washington Post Company to be pulling down tens of millions of dollars a year like their counterparts in finance and entertainment. But they’re not suffering. According to 2007 filings, here are paychecks for the three best-paid Posties and their boss.”

  • Bernstein: what makes good journalism

  • British Journalist for CBS Freed in Iraqi Army Raid

  • My Wall Street Journal Editor: WSJ Officials ‘Pretty Thin-Skinned‘”

  • After 18 years as founding editor of ForbesLife, Christopher Buckley has decided to move into the role of editor at large in order to focus more on his writing.”

  • US military to free AP photographer

  • Writers Vs. Editors: A Battle for the Ages

  • The AP reports, “As newspaper publishers build up their online operations and struggle through an advertising slump, one group is worried about being left behind — the folks who make printing presses and other equipment used to make newspapers.”

  • Time for New Blood in Newspaper Boardrooms: A Slate

  • E&P reports, “U.S. daily newspapers shrank their newsrooms by 2,400 journalists in the past year, a 4.4% workforce decrease that’s the biggest year-over-year cut in ranks since the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) began conducting its annual census 30 years ago.”

  • A Second Opinion of David Brooks

  • Romenesko has a memo from the Post’s Frank Ahrens: “After our big Pulitzer win on Monday, there was some melancholy around the newsroom along the lines of, ‘Oh, this will be the last year this kind of thing will happen.’ I said just the opposite. I bet the Big Three — us, the Times and the Journal — will most likely increase our dominance of the Pulitzers in coming years. Why? Because it’s the mid-sized papers that have been/will be so hard-hit by cuts they will no longer be able to produce Pulitzer-caliber journalism.” And, Los Angeles Times’ Peter Spiegel responds: “Frank Ahrens is an old friend of mine, so I hate to disagree with him in public, but I feel the need to defend my employer’s honor. I’m not sure where he gets the idea that the Washington Post, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are ‘the big three’ of American newspaper journalism.”

  • The Editors Weblog reports, “San Jose Mercury News designer Martin Gee has posted a photo documentary of the effects of several rounds of layoffs and buyouts in his California newsroom.”

  • Washington Post’s Dan Steinberg reports, “TK Continues to Win Argument Against Nobody”

  • Daily Campello Art News reports, “Norfolk newspaper The Virginian-Pilot sponsors an annual Student Gallery competition hosted at the Chrysler Museum of Art. The top awards were announced a couple of weeks ago at the Chrysler Museum of Art, where works by the contest’s 62 finalists are on display. Erin Ayres ‘Unveiled Tokens of Lonely and Deserted Past,’ was among two works that earned her the $1,000 first-place award. Now the controversy part… Teresa Annas, art critic for the same newspaper courageously writes that: This year’s top winners resulted from a third round of judging. The first two jurors selected nude artworks for first place. Those judges were Aaron De Groft, director of the Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, and Scott Howe, director of education and public programs at the Chrysler Museum. The Virginian-Pilot, the contest’s main sponsor, declined to honor those choices.”

  • Business Week reports, “Who Rupert Murdoch Had On Speed Dial. … Among a list understandably studded with News Corp executives and operating heads, it’s interesting to find New York Post editor (and longtime Murdoch confidant) Col Allan.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Jack F. Patterson, a hard-nosed newspaper executive who guided The Washington Post to unprecedented circulation growth from the 1950s to the 1980s and who mentored generations of the paper’s top administrators, died April 9 of melanoma at his home in Bethesda. He was 93.”

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt explores “The Blur Between Analysis and Opinion”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell asks, “The Washington Post was awash in Pulitzer Prizes last week — six of them, the most ever for The Post. In the world of newspaper journalism, Pulitzers are the pinnacle. But the prizes are awarded by journalists to journalists. Do they mean anything to readers, especially in this perilous time of newspaper contraction?”

  • Ben Pershing’s Player of the Week is Sen. Robert Byrd. “And, at 90 years old and in increasingly poor health, he is the chairman of one of the most important committees in Congress. The headline news on Capitol Hill this week was about Iraq, housing and the Colombia free trade agreement. But below the surface, a crucial subplot was unfolding in the Senate, as Byrd’s Democratic colleagues cautiously began discussing whether he should continue to chair the Appropriations Committee. On Tuesday, about 15 key Senate Democrats discussed at a private meeting whether Byrd would be able to handle the upcoming Iraq supplemental bill, according to a Roll Call story (subscription required). That initial media report sparked a flurry of subsequent and sometimes contradictory stories in the Capitol Hill press. The Politico got several Senate Democrats saying — publicly, at least — that they support Byrd. Roll Call came back with a report that Byrd was calling colleagues in hopes of saving his job. The Hill newspaper said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) was angling for Byrd’s post, though Leahy denied it. … What’s really going on here? Why is there so much confusion on the subject? There are two primary reasons: Senate collegiality and media skittishness.”

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    TV

  • Obama doesn’t commit to N.C. debate

  • Debating the Debate Usage Guidelines

  • A release announced, “WTTG FOX 5 has been awarded four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards by the Radio-Television News Directors Association, including ‘Overall Excellence,’ announced Duffy Dyer, the station’s Vice President and General Manager. FOX 5 News also received awards in the ‘Best Newscast,’ ‘Investigative Reporting’ and ‘Videography’ categories.”

  • Ailes to B&C Hall of Fame

  • Newsweek asks, “Can news anchors like Katie Couric survive?”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Indecency cases stuck in legal limbo at FCC”

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer reports, “The 2008 Media Research Center’s DisHonors Awards took place last night in Washington, D.C. and MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was (dis)honored with the ‘Quote Of The Year Award.’”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “CNN’s Wolf Blitzer isn’t just a newsman. He’s also a Washington sports nut, a regular at George Washington University men’s basketball games, a midcourt season ticket holder for the Washington Wizards, and big fan of the new Nationals baseball team. Lately, he’s tied both passions together, giving a Wizards pregame analysis from CNN’s Situation Room for the Verizon Center’s JumboTron. Now, he has his eyes on the Nats, whose new stadium boasts the biggest outfield TV ever. ‘I’d do it for the Nationals, too, but only if they want me,’ he tells us. ‘That’s a really big scoreboard.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Blogger Is Surprised by Uproar Over Obama Story, but Not Bitter

  • CJR’s Curtis Brainard reports, “A strange thing happened Tuesday. The New Republic had just launched a new ‘Environment & Energy’ blog on Sunday, and it had already hit a bump in the road. Just below the blog’s masthead was a small, green logo with the words, ‘Powered by BP.’ Within a day of the launch, TNR readers had begun to complain about irony of an oil giant (even one that has been trying to burnish its green credential for years) ‘powering’ (most assumed sponsoring) a blog about issues such as climate change and the development of renewable fuels. Just as I was reading the blog’s inaugural posts and its readers’ comments I refreshed the page and, lo and behold, the controversial BP logo had disappeared.”

  • The AP reports, “As people turn increasingly to the Internet for their news, there is concern whether they are learning enough about what goes on in their communities. With ‘the thinning down of newspapers and local television in America, there is measurably less local, civic information available,’ said Alberto Ibarguen, president and chief executive of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. ‘So what are the consequences of that?’ The foundation and the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, hope to find out.”

  • AdAge.com allows you to “Test Your Knowledge of Budget-Conscious News Ops and More in Media Guy’s Media-Studies Quiz”

  • PaidContent.org reports, “Salon Media, the parent of Salon.com, has raised $1 million in equity financing by selling its stock, just in time as its money was running out, again. The note, which it issued on April 4, 2008, may be convertible at a future date into common stock of the company at a conversion price equal of $1.68, it said in an SEC filing. They bear interest at the rate of 7.5 percent per annum, payable semi-annually, in cash or in kind, and mature on March 31, 2012, the filing states. It will use the funds raised for working capital and other general corporate purposes, the company said.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • BIG MAGAZINE TITLES SEE AD PAGES DWINDLE DOWN IN Q1

  • toohotfortnr writes, “On Monday, THFTNR goes out of business and Attackerman rises to take its place. That means I have a limited amount of time to take this blog back to its essence: the beef with TNR. And I have one score in particular that I badly need to settle. The story of Snitching Ryan Lizza.”

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    RADIO

  • Washington City Paper reports, “The health problems that sidelined WTOP’s Mark Plotkin for more than three months have apparently been resolved–the man was back in the chair this morning on the Politics Program in fine old form”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Gridskipper takes a look at The Newseum.

  • Don’t forget, the NLGJA-DC Happy Hour is Thursday, April 17 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hotel Helix Lounge at 1430 Rhode Island Ave., N.W.

  • Washington Social Diary reports, “There are small parties and there are big parties, and there are parties that are huge. Washington’s newest monumental addition, the Newseum, gave itself an opening party the other night that was huge — so many (one count had it at 1800) that they had to stand in line. Men in black tie, women in evening dresses, getting checked off the guest list.”

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    JOBS

  • St. Mary’s Today is looking for a News Desk/Reporter Person.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.07.08

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    Good morning Washington. Playbook tells us that Bloomberg’s Billy McQuillen, “who provides ‘adult’ supervision to Catholic University’s newspaper, is a birthday boy today.’”

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | EVENTS | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Monica Lewinsky will vote for Obama in ’08.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “Went to yet another ‘retirement’ party for a couple of newspaper writer friends of mine taking the buy out and getting the hell out of Dodge. All while the losers ‘running’ the paper (In to the ground..) are staying.”

  • This week’s mediabistro.com classes include How to Write About Anything, Interviewing Techniques and Fact-Checking.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • DCRTV reports,Richard Willing has joined the Office Of The Director of National Intelligence as its director of public affairs. Willing covered civil and criminal justice issues, as well as intelligence and national security, for USA Today from 1997 until this January.”

  • A release announced, “The Center for Public Integrity is pleased to announce that David E. Kaplan has been named the new Director of its International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ).”

  • News-Press.com reports,Kate Marymont, vice president and executive editor/Information Center at The News-Press and news-press.com, was named today as vice president/Information Center Content for McLean, Va.-based Gannett Inc., the paper’s owner.”

  • Business Wire reports,Jennifer Carroll, vice president of New Media Content and an architect of the company’s Information Center initiative, will become vice president of Digital Content for Gannett Digital.”

  • The Washington Post announced, “The Maryland desk is delighted to announce that we’ve hired Aaron Davis, an enterprise reporter for the Associated Press in Sacramento, Calif., to cover law enforcement in Prince George’s County. He succeeds Candace Rondeaux, who went to Foreign to cover Pakistan and Afghanistan.”

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of Society for Science & the Public, has named Tosh Arimura circulation manager.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Throughout the campaign, the media have treated Paul as a footnote. Snickering pundits all but dismissed him as a cranky kook, in the tradition of another Lone Star State insurgent, Ross Perot. Even when the mainstream publications covered him, you could imagine the assignment editors rolling their eyes in amusement, like parents patronizing a child. Yet anyone who looked hard enough knew that there was more to Paul than an inability to amass delegates. Most of the media, turned off by his shrill libertarian leanings, missed the real news value of Paul’s story — namely, the Texas congressman’s ability to connect intensely with voters.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows,Hillary Clinton’s retraction of her claim that she came under sniper fire while visiting Bosnia in 1996 was one of the main campaign storylines last week. But the controversy over her statements did not resonate as widely as the furor over statements made by Barack Obama’s pastor earlier in March. Four-in-ten Americans heard a lot about Clinton’s claim that she came under sniper fire, compared with 51% who had heard a lot about Rev. Wright’s sermons the week before.”
  • “Results from the Dow Jones Insight — 2008 Presidential Election Media Pulse show that Barack Obama’s pivotal race speech on March 18 may have helped mitigate that week’s controversy surrounding the remarks of Reverend Jeremiah Wright, shifting attention back to the issues of the economy and the upcoming Pennsylvania primary.”

  • CJR reports, “Business news is booming these days. Business-news sections not so much. They are disappearing and have been doing so regularly for months. The trend seems set to continue.”

  • Washington Blade editor’s Kevin Naff asks, “Why did editor Len Downie go to such lengths to hide the simple fact that a soldier was gay?”

  • Huffington Post has a “Eulogy for Dead Trees”

  • “As Katharine Weymouth, granddaughter of the legendary Katharine Graham, takes over as publisher of the Washington Post,” The Washingtonian has some “suggestions for her agenda, based on interviews with subscribers and Post staffers.”

  • Romenesko reports, “WSJ changes news desk structure”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Veteran newsman Roger Mudd” reports the “five best” “essential works about journalism.”

  • Joel Achenbach writes, “Let’s have a blog item today that’s not about me and my personal obsessions and neuroses. Instead, let’s talk about the general plight of all those middle-aged newspaper reporters out there who, at the age of 47, are just barely too young to get the buyout offer. Clearly it is time for these people to think about the next big career move.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “I’ve said many times that Barack Obama has gotten easy treatment from the news media, although that has changed a bit in recent weeks, particularly since the Rev. Jeremiah Wright became a household name, at least in households that watch plenty of cable. In fact, there’s a bit of a narrative about Obama as an elitist starting to take hold in the media, and that could prove troublesome for him.”

  • New York Time’s Public Editor writes, “Change Can Be Painful, but This One Shouldn’t Hurt”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Most regular local readers of The Post read it on newsprint. And when they want something in the paper and it’s not there, they usually don’t like me telling them to find it on washingtonpost.com.”

  • Washington City Paper’s Mike DeBonis asks, “Has Adrian Fenty reneged on his campaign tax pledge?”

  • Check out The Best of Cox 2008 winners.

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, March 30, 2008 in all categories.”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for First quarter 2008, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Major television networks are privately saying that if they have to worry about a fine every time someone utters a profanity on air, they may have to stop real-time broadcasting of live events such as the Academy Awards and Grammys. At the same time, the head of the Federal Communications Commission and parents groups are saying that if the Supreme Court removes the threat, ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox will seize the opportunity to make the airwaves more coarse and profane.”

  • 23/6 has the “Inappropriate Hottie Rundown: Racially Diverse Pundit Edition”

  • Forbes.com reports, “Forty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Tom Brokaw is making sure his legacy isn’t forgotten. In King, a two-hour television documentary premiering on the History Channel April 6, the award-winning newsman talks to everyone from Bill Clinton to Forest Whitaker to Dr. King’s son Martin Luther King III about the legendary civil rights figure.”

  • TVNewser reported on Friday, “Megan Henderson, morning anchor at Fox O&O KDFW, will be co-hosting Fox & Friends this weekend.”

  • The AP reports, “Early Mike Wallace interviews now online”

  • “TVNewser received several tips wondering what happened during the 6:30 feed of Friday’s NBC Nightly News. Brian Williams was anchoring from Memphis to mark the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Williams began the broadcast with a live interview with Sen. John McCain. What they didn’t expect was a crowd behind them with speeches blaring through loudspeakers.”

  • A tipster tells us from Friday, “Bill Press speaking to an irate caller on today’s ‘Washington Journal’: ‘Chris Matthews is in the tank for Barack Obama, but don’t blame it on me.’

  • “CNN Crosses Paths With Clinton, Grabs Impromptu Interview,” TVNewser reports.

  • From a TVNewser tipster: ‘I understand that there is a move afoot to develop a legal television network in place of CourtTV.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last night’s Daily Show with Jon Stewart featured a glance at Sen. Barack Obama’s recent media tour. Some got snubbed, some got cozy and some were ‘thrilled’ to spend an hour with the candidate…until hearts were broken.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com continues to achieve record-breaking traffic in March 2008. In March, ABCNEWS.com scored another high traffic month, reaching nearly 23 million uniques, an increase of 69% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. The site also garnered 207.4 million page views, up 44% from the previous year and marked four consecutive months of record page view growth. In March, the site increased video views by 123% compared to the same time last year, according to ABC.”

  • This Wednesday is the Blogger’s Happy Hour Bash at Velocity Five Restaurant. For more info, click here.

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “Is the Huffington Post really a $200 million company? Monday’s New York Times story about the fast-growing group blog/news aggregator left a lot of people wondering about that eye-catching number, reportedly the price the company uses in its internal discussions about the possibility of a sale. The consensus, among those who know about some matters: No, the Huffington Post is not remotely worth $200 million.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Google Inc. confirmed Thursday it bid in the recent government spectrum auction in an effort to wring higher competing bids out of Verizon Wireless and open up a large chunk of the airwaves to outside Internet devices.”

  • Reuters reports, “News Corp’s Fox Interactive Media Internet division could fall short of its fiscal 2008 revenue target of $1 billion, as it reorganizes its divisions to better exploit the online advertising market.”

  • ABC.com asks, “Should Drudge and Huffington Get Pulitzers?”

  • The Swamp reports, “It’s an introspective week for The Swamp. First we rolled out a new look and invited critiques. Now, some university researchers are asking whether we — and newspaper political blogs across the Web — should exist at all.”

  • Guardian’s greenslade reports, “I have argued for some time that the internet will free us from media mogul domination. Oddly, Rupert Murdoch has said much the same thing, a clue that I was being more than a shade optimistic. Now comes evidence that the democratising force of the net is anything but a given.”

  • Gannett Blog reports, “The non-profit Freedom Forum’s most recent tax return shows that it paid Founder Al Neuharth $225,000 in 2006, plus gave him a $200,545 expense account — the biggest such account of any officer, director or trustee. Neuharth, 84, who recently groused about his diminished mental capacity, worked 40 hours a week for Freedom Forum, the return shows.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The weekly newsmagazines have been declared dinosaurs as far back as the late 1980s. But now that 111 employees at Washington Post Co.’s Newsweek have taken buyouts, including many longtime editors, it’s clear that their cultures are finally being blown up and reinvented. And some say that’s not such a bad thing.”

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    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will host “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today. The show can be heard on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm.

  • Radio Ink reports, “In a letter to FCC Chairman Kevin Martin, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) notes that, although the Department of Justice has unconditionally approved the merger of XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio, ‘serious concerns remain as to how this merger will impact consumers if it is permiited to go forward.’”

  • FBLA Exclusive: Interview with Randi Rhodes’ Ex-Writer Barry Crimmins

  • NPR announced, “A special edition of NPR’s news-talk program Talk of the Nation will broadcast live from the Newseum on Tuesday, April 8, 2:00-4:00PM (ET). This broadcast — the first live national program from the new Washington, D.C.-based interactive museum of news – is part of the Newseum’s press preview day, in advance of its public opening on Friday, April 11, and will have a studio audience.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Just as the Eliot Spitzer sex scandal became the ultimate water-cooler conversation topic — if only for a few days — Sirius Satellite Radio launched Client 9 Radio, a 24/7 all-Spitzer channel, but just for a few days.”

  • New York Times reports, “In what would be the latest twist in the increasingly contentious battle over the $20 billion buyout of Clear Channel Communications, hedge fund clients of the banks balking at financing the deal are reportedly threatening to pull their business if the banks don’t move ahead with the deal for the radio broadcaster.”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • E&P reports, ” In a harsh press release, The White House slammed The New York Times for a Thursday column that criticized President Bush’s reaction to the economic crisis.”

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    EVENTS

  • Julie Ocean played at the Rock n Roll Hotel saturday night. Teh band’s CD comes out May 13. Check out their website here.

  • A release announced, “Andrea Rodgers, President and CEO of The Courage Cup, an IRS designated 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation established to help at-risk urban youth, is pleased to announce that Legal Times is inviting Washington law firms to attend Meadow Matches and participate in a Charity Segway Polo Challenge. This exciting day of polo matches will bring Washington’s legal community together for a day of charity in the picturesque Virginia Piedmont.”

  • PDN Pulse offers, “A Sneak Peek At The Newseum”

  • USAToday reports, “Massive Newseum opens window on journalism”

  • Kurtz reports, “At Sparkly Newseum, The Glory Of the Story Goes Above the Fold”

  • Lorraine Ahearn writes, “Determined to make the news ‘fun’ and ‘fresh,’ the Newseum has something for everyone. A 100-foot-wide screen lets visitors experience for themselves what it’s like to be interviewed by, say, Charlie Rose — with the help of 3-D glasses and complimentary Breathe-Right strips.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Unlike that bombastic structure, the journalism museum makes no attempt to bow and scrape to classical traditions. It is sheathed in glass, not masonry, to reveal some of its activity inside and counter the sealed-up monumentality so prevalent in Washington.”

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    BOOKS

  • The Washington City Paper writes, “For decades, D.C. has been hurting for a classic novel all its own. Some suggestions on how to make it.”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Latin America Deputy Regional Editor and a Global Media Services (GMS) Unit Manager.

  • YMCA of Metropolitan Washington is looking for a Communications Specialist.

  • Greenpeace Inc. is looking for a Media Relations Director and a Graphic Designer.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist ,Group Retention & Billing.

  • Forbes.com is looking for an Unpaid Intern.

  • Association of American Medical Colleges is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.11.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Most of you did not watch the last episode of The Wire.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Ben Goessling joined The Washington Times sports staff last weekend, joining Mark Zuckerman in Viera, Fla., where they will finish covering spring training. He’ll be covering the Nationals with Mark this season. Ben was previously at the Star Tribune in Minneapolis.

  • Kellie Lunney has been hired as Government Executive’s new senior editor. She is replacing Anne Laurent.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Politico’s Bill Nichols turned 50 yesterday.

  • The Independent reports, “The Financial Times is set to break the mould again when it relaunches its FT Weekend edition for Sunday readers with a big marketing campaign later this spring. Already one of the highest-circulation Saturday newspapers in the UK, the FT is working on secret plans to make the edition work just as well on the next day.”

  • USA Today reports, “A federal judge has ordered a former USA TODAY reporter to begin paying fines of up to $5,000 per day after finding her in contempt of court for failing to identify sources who named former Army scientist Steven Hatfill as a possible suspect in the 2001 anthrax attacks.”

  • The New York Times reports, “‘We are uncomfortable with the term ‘citizen journalism,” said Todd Wolfson, 35, a doctoral candidate at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the organizers of the Media Mobilizing Project in Philadelphia. ‘We prefer the term ‘community journalism.” Citizen journalism has become the faddish name for the effort to encourage regular folk to use the Internet to report the news directly, but Mr. Wolfson had a point: many of the people whom his organization and an immigrant rights group, Juntos, are teaching to make video reports for streaming on the Internet are not citizens. Many are not even legal residents.”

  • Forbes.com reports,Lachlan Murdoch is facing a setback in his plans for re-entry into the media sector. After the major financial backer of his proposed $3.3 billion takeover of Consolidated Media Holdings suddenly walked away from the deal, the elder son of Rupert Murdoch is now knocking on the doors of other U.S. investors, seeking support for the bid.”

  • New York Times’ Public Editor writes, “In the 10 days leading up to Hillary Clinton’s victories last week in Ohio and Texas, the news media came under withering attack for being, in the words of a ‘Saturday Night Live’ skit, ‘totally in the tank’ for Barack Obama. After Clinton won, Obama said the news media caved under pressure from her campaign and suggested that her record has not been as thoroughly examined as she claims. What about The Times? Has it been in the tank for Obama and unfairly tough on Clinton? Has it looked enough into their records and backgrounds? Many readers have complained that the newspaper is not shooting down the middle.”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Thousands of women — including this one — were offended by an Outlook opinion piece last Sunday by writer Charlotte Allen. Complaints flooded my in-box, letters to the editor, the comment board linked to the article on washingtonpost.com, and the blogs. Outlook editors thought the piece was humorous and knew it might be controversial, but they were stunned at the outpouring of outrage.” Check out the reader comments here.

  • The Inhofe EPW Press Blog reports, “USA Today and the Los Angeles Times provided hope today that the media may be turning away from hyping alarmism and platitudes on environmental issues and instead offering the public fair and balanced information. The first hopeful report is from USA Today on the science and politics of listing polar bears under the Endangered Species Act, and the second is an editorial from the Los Angeles Times stripping bare the rhetoric and reality about cap-and-trade legislation.”

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    TV

  • When it rains it pours: Another glowing profile of “Morning Joe.”

  • A MSNBC release announced, “MSNBC, the Place for Politics, is expanding its already substantial political programming lineup next week as the 2008 presidential race continues to heat up. NBC News Chief White House Correspondent David Gregory will anchor ‘Race for the White House,’ a fast-paced daily look at the latest election news, weekdays, 6-7 p.m. ET on MSNBC. ‘Race for the White House’ premieres Monday, March 17, and will continue through the election and beyond as the nation’s focus continues on the historic Presidential campaign. Also bolstering MSNBC’s political coverage, NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell will anchor MSNBC each weekday afternoon, 1-2 p.m. ET’”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports, “The ‘stupid computer’ is a repeated target of the dimwitted office manager Michael Scott on ‘The Office.’ But the show itself may be motivating viewers to put down their remote controls and pick up their laptops.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “Imagine lying on the couch watching the latest episode of ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ when suddenly a catchy new song plays. You click on your TV remote, buy the song, and download the tune to your laptop — without missing a second of the melodrama on the screen. Starting this spring, Backchannelmedia Inc. will be one step closer to making that a reality. During an initial launch in May, the Boston company will test a new technology on WCVB-TV Channel 5 that allows viewers to use their remotes to tag — or bookmark — Internet sites and products that are featured on TV so they can check them out later on their computers. In future versions, Backchannelmedia expects viewers will be able to purchase the products and services they see during their favorite TV shows and commercial breaks.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Originally set to run through Super Tuesday II, then extended through the end of last week, TVNewser has learned America’s Election HQ will continue indefinitely during the 5pmET hour on FNC.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Knight Kiplinger posted on Kiplinger.com’s Politics blog for the first time yesterday about how Barack Obama is no JFK.

  • The Observer reports, “Richard Branson could scoop $750m if Virgin Media is sold to US private equity groups, which are actively considering launching a takeover bid, despite continuing turmoil in the credit markets. According to a private document entitled ‘Project Coaxial’ — seen by The Observer — Blackstone, Cinven, KKR and Providence Equity are prepared to offer $6bn to $7.5bn for the company, in which Branson’s Virgin group holds a 10.5 per cent share.”

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comcast Interactive Capital will invest in Giant Realm, the rapidly growing affiliate network of video game/entertainment sites targeting men 16-34. The venture-capital arm of the cable giant will lead a new round of financing totaling $3.5 million. Giant Realm also is backed by Edison Ventures Fund and WMA, which founded and previously funded the company. Giant Realm CEO James Green said the cash infusion will fuel expansion of its staff, enhancement of the Giant Realm destination site and enable further development of its online publisher group.”

  • The New York Times reports, “In an effort to slow Google’s siphoning of advertising dollars away from television, the nation’s six largest cable companies are making plans for a jointly owned company that would allow national advertisers to buy customized ads and interactive ads across the companies’ systems.”

  • Business Wire reports, “The Washington Post Company announced today that it will sponsor a global competition for digital startups from LaunchBox Digital, a Washington, DC-based investment firm focused on cutting edge mobile and Web technologies. Called ‘LaunchBox08,’ the competition encourages applicants to submit innovative ideas in order to receive seed funding and participate in a 12-week business building program with access to first-rate mentors and advisors.”

  • A reader tells us, “Express has audio of the president singing. It’s from a YouTube video. The vid itself is pretty bad, but the audio’s good.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • A reader points out to us, “Time’s Ana Marie Cox calls Bush ‘War Criminal’”

  • The AHCJ Awards have been announced and among the winners are National Journal’s James A. Barnes and Marilyn Werber Serafini who received second place for “The Debate Over Health Care Reform”

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    JOBS

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Deputy Managing Editor, NationalJournal.com

  • American Bar Association, Rule of Law Initiative is looking for an Outreach Director.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for an Online Marketing Associate.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.27.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Ralph Nader and Chelsea Clinton.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | RADIO | JOBS

  • It is close, but most of you think that Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski do like each other off camera.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that The Washington Times’ Greg Lopes has joined PhRMA’s press shop.

  • Ed Morrissey writes on Captain’s Quarters, “Today brings exciting news and an end to a time in my life that has proven far more successful than I ever dreamed. Beginning on March 1, I will begin working for Michelle Malkin, a friend, mentor, and writer I have long admired. She has offered me a position as writer at Hot Air, and my blogging will appear exclusively there.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Rachel Sklar looks into the media’s “Drumbeat For A Hillary Exit” (and fact checks Richard Cohen while she’s at it).

  • TheStreet.com reports, “The Ochs-Sulzberger family managed to cling to their control over the New York Times last year, but they may not be able to keep dissidents off the publisher’s board of directors this time around. Scott Galloway of investment firm Firebrand Partners, with financial backing from activist hedge fund Harbinger Capital Partners, has hired D.F. King, a proxy solicitation firm, to press its case with New York Times shareholders in the lead-up to the company’s annual meeting on April 22, according to a source familiar with the matter.”

  • E&P reports, “As Pulitzer Prize jurors prepare to gather next week in New York to sift through hundreds of submissions and find three finalists in each of the 14 journalism categories to nominate for the full board to consider in a month, speculation is mounting over which entries have the best chance. … Some news events, such as the Virginia Tech massacre and the Minnesota bridge collapse, give a clear breaking news advantage to papers near those stories. A handful of investigative and in-depth projects, including several China-related probes, are also top contenders, based on interviews with a few jurors and a look at the other major awards already announced.”

  • The Horses Mouth reports, John Solomon’s Washington Times Presents The Next Obama Smear: Military ‘Fears’ Him”

  • Slate’s Michael Kinsley writes about his “apparent concern about the appearance of the possibility of the appearance of a possible affair.”

  • Cox’s Ken Herman reports, “Today’s installment in one of Washington’s best long-running shows: Hearst Newspapers’ Helen Thomas vs. whoever happens to be in the White House. The topic was President Bush’s insistence on lawsuit immunity for telecommunications companies that cooperated in the federal government’s program to eavesdrop on suspected terrorists. Ms. Thomas, as she has for several weeks, wanted White House Press Secretary Dana Perino to explain why immunity is needed. If the companies did nothing wrong, Ms. Thomas argued, they have nothing to fear in a court of law.”

  • The Nation reports, “Evidently the editors of the New York Times have taken leave of their senses. There can be no other explanation for putting a story on the front page of their newspaper speculating about Barack Obama’s being assassinated. The Times is beginning to make it a practice of running news-free stories on its front page. Most of them are harmless, but this one is sickening.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Clinton Campaign Response To New York Times Rejected”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “A Veterans Charity Cries Foul”

  • U.S. News’ Paul Bedard shows us a little local activism goes a long way.

  • Politico reports, “Obama stiffs, stifles national press”

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    TV

  • Tucker vs. Clinton Campaign Again on MSNBC

  • FCC ready to intervene on Web access

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ averaged 9.21 million Total Viewers and a 2.4/8 among Adults 25-54 during the week of February 18-22. For the week, ‘World News’ placed first in the Adult 25-54 rating (2.4), tying NBC’s ‘Nightly News.’ For the seventh consecutive week, “World News” won among Women 25-54 (2.7/9).”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research
    data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of February 18, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 9.627 million total viewers”

  • Check out Green Room Girl’s new pictures!

  • CJR reports, “Which of Tim Russert’s expert roundtablers did he turn to first on yesterday’s Meet the Press to discuss PlagiarismGate (the Clinton campaign’s making hay of Barack Obama borrowing phrases from Gov. Deval Patrick)? Russert turned first to Doris Kearns Goodwin, the presidential historian and Meet the Press regular. And it should have made for awkward television — asking someone with a plagiarism scandal in her past to weigh in on charges of plagiarism from the campaign trail. I mean, what does that disclosure look like — ‘You’re no stranger to charges of plagiarism, Doris, how does Obama battle this? Does this stick?’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Helped by strong ratings from three debates, CNN beat Fox News Channel for first place in prime time (8-11pmET) in the A25-54 demo.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Poynter Online reports, “Remember when newspaper editors thought it was impressive to have a virtual version of their newspaper, turning pages and all? Remember how no one read them? Well it seems the same mistakes are being made all over again by the Arabic-language daily An-Nahar.”

  • Slate looks at “The environmental pros and cons of reading online.”

  • “Due to an overwhelming amount of requests, the final EPpy Awards entry deadline has been extended to Friday, February 29th.” Enter here!

  • Reuters reports, “Newspaper and television company Media General Inc said it agreed to acquire DealTaker.com, a coupon and shopping Web site, from Plano, Texas-based NARAE Enterprises Inc, to expand its portfolio of interactive advertising and marketing solutions.”

  • The AP reports, “Online advertising revenues exceeded $21 billion for the first time in 2007, although preliminary data compiled by an industry trade group also suggest growth is slowing. The Interactive Advertising Bureau said its estimates show ad revenues grew 25 percent last year from nearly $17 billion in 2006. In dollar amounts, the estimated gain was $4.2 billion — less than the 35 percent and $4.3 billion growth seen in 2006 over 2005.”

  • Omnivoracious.com is “reviewing the reviewers”

  • washingtonpost.com’s Ben Pershing reports, “Amid the titanic fight last week over the expiration of the terrorist surveillance law, there was another, less intense debate brewing below the surface. This wasn’t your standard Republican vs. Democrat debate. It cut across all lines, pitting executive branch agencies against each other, prompting disagreements among lawmakers of the same party, even (gasp!) dividing reporters. This fight wasn’t over whether the expiration of the Protect America Act put the country in danger. It was over when the thing actually expired.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin Martin warned yesterday that Internet service providers can’t block consumers from using lawful Internet activities in the name of providing better service.”

  • AdAge.com reports,Chris Anderson Explains How ‘Freeconomics’ Will Change the Media World”

  • PRNewser Enters Top 100 PR Blog List at #55

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    RADIO

  • Sirius Says It Could Do Without XM

  • A release announced, “Diane Rehm, host of WAMU 88.5 and National Public Radio’s The Diane Rehm Show, will receive The Distinguished Washingtonian Award in Literature and the Arts from The University Club of Washington, D.C. The club’s Board of Governors will present the award at a dinner to be held in Diane Rehm’s honor on Thursday, May 1, 2008.”

  • Reuters reports, “Sirius Satellite Radio Inc, whose proposed purchase of rival XM Satellite Radio is still awaiting regulatory approval, reported a smaller quarterly loss on Tuesday as subscribers to its pay-radio service increased.”

  • Dan Steinberg reports,Kornheiser Names His Blogging Enemy”

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    JOBS

  • Spectrum Science Communications is looking for a Creative Director/Web & Graphic Design.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Multimedia Investigative Team Editor and an ENPS Project Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 02.19.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • The Oscars are your favorite awards show.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of the Society for Science & the Public, has named Jonathan Oleisky its new associate publisher.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Readers are super-sensitive to any perceived slight to their favorite candidate — from Page 1 display to photos to the details of graphics. And they want guidance from The Post in issues coverage and editorial endorsements before they vote. Several readers were unhappy that on last Sunday’s front page, Sen. Barack Obama’s Feb. 9 primary victories were played below a story on the Washington Redskins naming Jim Zorn as head coach.”

  • William McGurn on “Press Corps Quagmire

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Now that pending layoffs at the New York Times and Los Angeles Times have made newsroom cutbacks all but unanimous, some managers eager to maximize the feet on the street at their newspapers are wondering if they really need all those editors.”

  • A release announced, “The International Center for Journalists, the Washington-based nonprofit organization, is seeking nominations for the 2008 Knight International Journalism Awards. The Awards recognize international journalists who demonstrate an extraordinary devotion to the craft by upholding the highest journalistic standards despite overwhelming challenges.”

  • Crains New York reports, “On the heels of a 13% plunge in December’s advertising revenue, The New York Times said last week that it would cut 100 newsroom jobs over the course of this year. The paper isn’t the only suffering media business. Radio ad revenue for the New York marketplace took a slide in January, and television insiders predict a low-single-digit ad revenue drop in the first quarter for the local marketplace. Add magazines to the mix: Some are seeing the bottom fall out of their ad page counts.”

  • “Pundit Police Watch News Talkers

  • Stephen Hunter talks about his heart attack.

  • Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson asks, “Are the news media being beastly to Hillary Clinton? Are political reporters and commentators — as Bill Clinton suggested but didn’t quite come out and say in a radio interview Tuesday — basically in the tank for Barack Obama?” In response, Terence Smith writes, “Gene’s answer: no and no. My view: yes and yes.”

  • The New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “Three articles in The Times last month raised an intriguing question: When does fairness demand that a newspaper walk down the middle in a scientific dispute, and when does responsibility demand that it take sides? It is hardly a new question, and The Times, historically, has been slow to declare victors.”

  • A release announced, “The American Society of Newspaper Editors has selected the winners of its annual awards for distinguished writing and photography.” Among the winners are Anne Hull and Dana Priest, The Washington Post for their stories “exposing the deep and widespread problems at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.”

  • Edward Wasserman, the Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University, writes, “Beneath the somber tales of shrinking revenues and staff cuts is an even more somber reality about the news business: The nearly two-century-old marriage between consumer advertising and journalism is on the rocks.”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “Coverage Adds to Clinton’s Steep Climb”

  • The New Yorker reports, “few days before Senator Barack Obama swept the Democratic primaries in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, people across the country, picking up their favorite newspaper, were greeted with the following headline: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Big Part In Obama’s Young Life. In any event, that’s what some readers thought they read. On second glance, they realized their mistake. The headline actually said this: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Bit Part In Obama’s Young Life. Maybe, though, the mistake wasn’t just the readers’, especially the bleary-eyed among them who hadn’t yet had their morning coffee. After all, it wasn’t exactly news that ‘drugs’ had played a part (and only a ‘bit part’ at that) in the adolescence of the junior senator from Illinois. That particular factoid had been on the public record for more than twelve years. And if it wasn’t news, what was it doing on the front page of the New York Times?”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has acquired $60 million worth of shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. over the past three weeks as part of its push to grow its education business.”

  • Market Watch reports, “A pair of hedge funds seeking representation on the board of directors of New York Times Co. disclosed on Thursday that they have raised their stake in the media company above 10%. Firebrand Partners and Harbinger Capital Partners reported holding 15.1 million New York Times shares, or a 10.54% stake, after a Harbinger fund bought 441,100 Class A shares for $17.62 a share on Tuesday. The funds had previously reported holding 14.25 million shares for a 9.96% stake.”

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    TV

  • Do we have too many pundits? Paul Farhi looks into it.

  • A CNN release announced, “This Week in Politics will move to the 6 p.m. (ET) time slot on Saturdays beginning this weekend. The one-hour program, anchored by Tom Foreman, previously aired at 7 p.m. on Saturdays.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Some Shuster Defense on Rival Networks”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “It’s official: The strike drove writers nuts. No, not TV and film writers. Journalists. Fourteen weeks of covering bitter trench warfare between the Writers Guild of America and the studios, and the ink-stained wretches are feeling wretched. It’s not just that covering a complex, polarizing news story for more than three months left them fried. The worst part has been the blowback. And we don’t mean from the studios and networks, either. No, friends, it’s the ugliest kind of warfare: writer on writer.”

  • TVNewser reported this weekend, “This morning on Fox & Friends Weekend, an entirely new group of anchors graced the FNC screen. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris greeted viewers at 7amET. Johnny Dollar has some clips of the trio’s first day.”

  • From Playbook: “ABC’s Ann Compton e-mails that when President Bush landed today in rural Arusha, Tanzania, in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, he was greeted by Masai tribal dancers, hundreds of cheering Africans lining the — and three people, standing apart, waving OBAMA signs. ‘Not certain whether Bush saw them,’ Ann writes. ‘Just bought Mike Allen a ZEBRA — bringing it home on press plane. Really!’”

  • Washington Post reports, “In Washington, politics and the press always manage to inject themselves into the proceedings, even at a music awards show honoring the best and brightest on the local music scene. So at a long-standing music awards ceremony like the Wammies, you pretty much expect that at some point, CBS newsman Bob Schieffer is going to take to the stage. After all, there is no moment more quintessential D.C., more inside-the-Beltway, than the sight of Schieffer — who won a Spotlight Award last night — rocking at the mike with the local band Honky Tonk Confidential, speak-singing with a country-western twang a little ditty called ‘TV Anchorman.’ He also extolled the wonders of the ‘American dream’ — and promised that after the presidential inauguration next year he’ll forswear TV life for a full-time music career.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “ABC newsman Bob Woodruff’s long recovery from a brain injury suffered in an IED attack in 2006 in Iraq is turning a new page. Literally. He tells us that in the upcoming paperback version of his hit book, In an Instant, his kids will write of how they dealt with their father’s injury, coma, and recovery.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington Post reports,Barry Schuler moved to Washington from Silicon Valley to join AOL during its golden days, one of the many top technology professionals the Internet giant recruited to the region. But when the former chief executive left in 2003, he returned to California to become an investor and start a technology company, following other executives who have drifted away from the region. … Departures like Schuler’s are one reason Washington’s technology industry is still struggling to mature a decade after Dulles-based AOL became a magnet for talent.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Media Work Force Sinks to 15-Year Low”

  • The Guardian reports, “Media companies including the BBC, Channel 4, Google, Yahoo and social-networking site Bebo have signed up to a new code of conduct … designed to give parents more information about the suitability for children of audiovisual content available on the internet and mobile phones.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “With recession talk in the air, marketers are scrutinizing their spending. But old, reliable tricks such as counting on coupons to goose sales might not work this time around. Luckily, cheaper options abound in emerging media such as mobile, e-mail and search.”

  • Variety reports, “Amid all the recent headlines about tie-ups and acquisitions involving Yahoo, Microsoft, Google and Facebook, one player continues to look more like a perpetual bridesmaid than bride. Few could dispute that AOL, the onetime buyer of Time Warner, has become a burr under its parent company’s saddle financially. Q4 2007 results released Feb. 6 showed an array of less-than-scintillating numbers. Division revenue slipped below 10% of the conglom’s total for the first quarter since 2000. Fiscal-year operating profit was just 14% of the total. Display ad revenue gained just 3% for the quarter, to $252 million, and paid search rose only 1%.”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “The Right Strengthens its Hold on McCain, the Media Refuse to Notice”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Reed Elsevier, the Anglo-Dutch media group, is drawing up plans to axe more than 1,000 jobs as part of a continuing efficiency drive, The Sunday Telegraph has learned. The company, which owns the LexisNexis information service and the medical journal, The Lancet, is understood to be preparing to cut the jobs over the next couple of years as it centralises functions such as procurement, human resources and IT across the group. Analysts expect the job cuts — the majority of which will take place outside Britain — to contribute to a restructuring that will shed as much as £100m from Reed’s annual costs bill. It is unclear whether the cuts will be acknowledged formally in its annual results announcement on Wednesday.”

  • Kiplinger.com’s Business Resource Center launched a new Politics blog. Check it out here.

  • The Telegraph reports, “AOL, the American internet company, is attempting to piece together a deal with Yahoo! designed to help the Silicon Valley-based search engine evade the clutches of Microsoft, the world’s biggest software group”

  • New York Times reports, “In the middle of a media-saturated political season, Jared Kushner, publisher of The New York Observer, has been quietly nurturing an ambitious political journalism venture. The plan is to pull together 50 Web sites, one for each state, into a political hub called Politicker.com. Each site will serve as an intensely local source for political articles, speculation and scandal, Mr. Kushner said.”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “Illinois Shooting Tragedy Pushes Election Off The Top, Mostly”

  • Chris Cillizza admits, “The Fix is a non-voter — for a few reasons”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Washington Monthly may team up with Common Cause.

  • “In the press, Hillary has been trapped by her own story, whereas Obama has been freed by his,” writes John Heilemann.

  • New York Post reports, “While magazine circulation inched up an average of just 1.1 percent in the second half of 2007, a few magazines with innovative approaches and partnerships managed to beat the odds.”

  • The Feed reports, “Time magazine senior political analyst Mark Halperin joined a small, yet growing club this week, when he issued an apology for saying John Edwards considered Barack Obama ‘kind of a pussy’ on a satellite radio talk show.”

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    RADIO

  • FMQB reports, “Clear Channel Communications released its 2007 and Q4 fiscal results, with the company’s quarterly profit up 51.7 percent. Earnings in the quarter jumped from $211 in 2006 to $320 million in 2007. Revenue was up four percent to $1.84 billion. For the entire year, revenue was up six percent to $6.82 billion. Net income increased by 37 percent to $938.5 million.”

  • Canadian Business reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. spent roughly $1.2 million in 2007 to lobby for approval of its proposed $5 billion acquisition by rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., among other issues. The satellite radio operator spent $580,000 in the second half of 2007 to lobby Congress and the Department of Justice about the pending merger, according to a disclosure form posted online Tuesday by the Senate’s public records office.”

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    BOOKS

  • Newsweek asks, “What to make of ‘Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks From the Wild Web’? The new book, edited by Sarah Boxer, the New York Times’s first (now former) ‘Web critic,’ endeavors to compile an anthology of the best posts from the best Web logs. ‘W,’ you might ask, ‘TF?’ To what end this dead-tree blogroll? Is this a sincere attempt to explain the blogging phenomenon-which some estimate is, in its current form, more than 15 years old to off-the-grid grandmas across America? Or is this compilation a cynical ploy to cash in on free content?”

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Television Producer-Writer.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for a Financial Services Reporter.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Web Producer and a Web Editor.

  • Summit Business Media is looking for a DC Reporter for Credit Union Times Magazine.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.22.08

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    Good morning Washington. Eleven years ago today, the Senate confirmed Madeleine Albright as secretary of state. And it’s Diane Lane’s birthday! (Hat Tip: MicCheckRadio).

    See more after the jump.

    Read more

    Morning Reading List, 12.10.07

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    Good morning Washington.

    For those of you wondering why we’re not including the Politico, Roll Call and The Hill in our “Pictures of Morning Papers” feature — which we’d love to do — it’s because a.) Politico and Roll Call are usually a day behind in posting theres and b.) The Hill hasn’t put one up since Nov. 28.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You don’t think the Hillary Clinton campaign is sitting on some big story on Obama.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Stories about rumors are tricky and easily misconstrued. A Nov. 29 story and headline that explored Barack Obama’s ‘connections to the Muslim world’ and rumors that he is Muslim were met with a swift Internet reaction that left some staffers stunned at its ferocity. Even Post editorial cartoonist Tom Toles was ‘so upset’ that he took the unusual step of taking potshots at the story in an editorial page cartoon.”

  • AP reports, “Newspaper publishers, entering 2008 with some of the worst economic conditions in many years, said Wednesday they hope to bring even more readers — and ad spending — to their Web sites with expanded offerings of news, advertising and video.”

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “On Oct. 12, retired Lt. Gen. Ricardo S. Sanchez, the former top military commander of American forces in Iraq, delivered a scathing denunciation of the Bush administration’s ‘incompetent’ management of the war — and an equally blistering denunciation of the news media.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Tribune Co., the newspaper publisher being taken private by real estate billionaire Sam Zell, plans to reduce borrowings by $500 million and confirmed the deal will close this year, sending the stock up nearly 8 percent.”

  • Page Six reports, “There’s a reason why it took so long for Ben Bradlee, 86, to receive the Legion of Honor from France, as the legendary Washington Post editor did last week. In the 1950s, when Bradlee was Newsweek’s Paris-based European bureau chief, he was expelled from the country for trying to interview leaders of Algeria’s revolutionary rebel army. His expulsion was repealed many years later, but the French are slow to forgive.”

  • Forbes.com reports, “You know what ails The New York Times Co.–eroding circulation, falling advertising revenue through the first three quarters of the year and the looming threat of stronger competition from The Wall Street Journal and its soon-to-be-owner Rupert Murdoch.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Adapting to a changing news, information, and advertising economy means that newspapers must adapt the technology they use — not just online, but for print editions too.”

  • “Four veteran black sports journalists are taking a voluntary buyout offered at USA Today, wiping out its NBA coverage team, the USA Today staffers told Journal-isms on Saturday.”

  • SND Update Blog reports, “J. Ford Huffman, deputy managing editor of design at USA TODAY, one of the paper’s original architects and a 25-year veteran, has accepted a buyout — one of as many as 43 rumored to be pending (management sought 45 according to recent media reports).”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer reports, “The World Health Organization publicly spanked the New York Times last week for breaking an embargoed study about measles. The offending article was a 60-word news brief by Celia W. Dugger in the paper’s Nov. 29 edition. No matter that the Times broke the embargo accidentally and apologized to WHO. The organization issued an e-mail announcing to the press corps the punishment—a two-week suspension of all Times reporters from the WHO media distribution list.”

  • The Center for American Progress reports, “Think Again: Reporting Iraq Is a Lot Harder than it Looks”

  • Bill Walsh, “national copy desk chief at The Washington Post and proprietor of The Slot: A Spot for Copy Editors, offers up the next set of well-edited bites” for Metrocurean.

  • Jeff Gannon writes, “The Old Media barely missed a toe-tapping beat in their relentless coverage of the Larry Craig ‘scandal’ to mention that a staffer for Democratic Sen. Maria Cantwell was arrested last week by the FBI after showing up for a sexual rendezvous with someone he believed to be a 13 year-old boy. The handling of the ‘incident’ by the Old Media provides a textbook example of pervasive liberal media bias I discuss in my book, ‘The Great Media War, A Battlefield Report’.”

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    TV

  • NBC Now Will Air Freedom’s Watch Ad

  • Satellite TV on the Move, at Fox News” (and more from TVNewser)

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News Nightline will air original programming next week. Shows for the week include: a story about Oprah Winfrey campaigning with Democratic presidential hopeful Senator Barack Obama, an interview with Kay Warren, wife of famous evangelist Pastor Rick Warren and a profile of Francis Ford Coppola.”

  • BusinessWeek reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin has suffered a number of setbacks in his increasingly lonely fight against the cable companies. Martin, of course, is determined to place tighter regulations on the industry by restricting the reach of companies and allowing subscribers to pay only for the channels they want. Now, Democratic and Republican lawmakers—as well as Martin’s fellow commissioners—are questioning his selective use of data to support his campaign.”

  • USA Today reports, “Here’s a bit of cheery news for media executives concerned about the softening economy. Political campaigns likely will spend more than $4.5 billion on ads and marketing in the 2008 election season, a 64% leap from 2004 — the last cycle with a presidential race — research and consulting firm PQ Media says in a report out Thursday.”

  • Times Online reports,James Murdoch, the chief executive of BSkyB, is expected to step down today to take on the job of running News Corporation’s European and Asian operations. Mr Murdoch will be replaced by Jeremy Darroch, who is the chief financial officer of BSkyB. Sky is 39.1 per cent owned by News Corp, parent company of The Times.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last week’s CNN/YouTube debate propelled the CNN program into the top 10 in all of cable news programs, the first time in more than two years that a single CNN program has cracked the top 10. The ranking is compiled by total viewers, Live +SD.”

  • B&C reports, “Some 1,500 communications attorneys, lobbyists and their guests, including a few ink-stained scribes, took refuge from the picture-postcard snow to gather at Washington, D.C.’s Hilton hotel Wednesday night for the annual Federal Communications Commission chairman’s dinner.”

  • Reuters reports, “According to the New York Post, the most recent rumblings rise from NBC, which is expected top make cuts in its news division, particularly at NBC News and MSNBC.”

  • A release announced, “MSNBC’s Decision 2008 coverage continues
    with a ‘Super Tuesday,’ Dec. 11, highlighted by in-depth analysis of the latest local and national poll numbers as the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary approach and the races heat up.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington City Paper’s Black Plastic Bag reports, “In response to the broken neck suffered by CNN anchor John Roberts, the media-insider blog FishbowlDC went with a Busta Rhymes reference. For the record, we here at BPB would’ve gone Shaolin-style with ‘Protect Ya Neck.’”

  • Slate launched its first portable widget: the official Bushisms Generator. You can read random Bushisms, hand-picked by Slate’s editor Jacob Weisberg by embedding the widget on your site. To embed the widget, visit this URL and hit “code” to copy and paste the HTML code directly on your site: http://www.clearspring.com/widgets/471f80ec102ef440

  • James Brady “is raising the question of just how much help you are allowed to have in putting your own name on the title page of a serious book. Am I nitpicking here or raising a legitimate question?”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “Huckabee Tries to Shoot the Messenger, But Wounds His Campaign Instead”

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    MAGAZINES

  • A reader says, “scherer worked at salon, mother jones and the nation. hmm, i wonder what his political inclinations are? and yet, if time hired someone who had worked at the weekly standard, national review and wash times, there would be an uproar.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Macrovision, a California-based distributer of digital content, is buying TVGuide in a $2.8 billion deal.”

  • National Journal’s Bill Powers writes, “According to the media, we’re supposed to have learned all kinds of things from the rise of Mike Huckabee. … What I’ve taken away from the Huckabee phenomenon is that we should stop worrying so much about horse race journalism.”

  • NewsBusters reports, “Try to remember a time in September when it was reported that the Hillary Clinton campaign showed its ‘hard-nosed media strategy’ by getting GQ magazine to spike a piece on Clinton team in-fighting by threatening to pull access to Bill Clinton for GQ’s planned December ‘Man of the Year’ cover package. Well, that ‘Man of the Year’ issue is out, and there was no bucking, only fawning.”

  • Can you answer CQ’s Political Trivia for Dec. 7?

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    RADIO

  • Fenty offers part of budget surplus for Radio One development

  • From DCRTV:

      WAMU’s Diane Rehm picks up a CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Palliative Care Award from the Greater Washington Partnership For Palliative And End-of-Life Care. For a January 2007 interview with author Calvin Trillin concerning “About Alice.” The award will be presented tonight during a reception at DC’s Sibley Hospital…..

  • In a recent online chat, Going Out Gurus took “a moment to remember Tom Terrell, the critic, promoter and DJ, who passed away last week after a long battle with prostate cancer.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You probably don’t know this, but there was yet another presidential debate the other day. You didn’t see it. But don’t feel bad — not that you would — but nobody saw it. It was on National Public Radio. And the reviews have been positive, save for the little ‘it put me to sleep’ factor. But all the plaudits got this writer thinking how you could repackage the debate, draw a crowd and inform a potentially large size of the electorate.”

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Texas Monthly interviews Dan Bartlett.

  • The New York Post reports, Karl Rove, the controversial and long-time senior adviser to President George W. Bush, is shopping a memoir in an auction that will kick off today and likely result in a seven-figure payday.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that the new Communications Director for Rep. Brian Baird is Rachel Irwin, former Maine Press Secretary for Senator Olympia Snowe.

  • Maura Judkis is the newest addition to U.S. News as a web producer. “She will be working closely with Ben Harder on the new Science site and with Sara Clarke on the Money & Business site.”

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    JOBS

  • Nationaly Syndicated Radio is looking for Top level support staff.

  • National Journal is looking for a Staff Correspondent.

  • Regent University is seeking a Journalism Professor for Interactive Journalism program.

  • AARP is looking for a Multimedia Producer and a Daily News Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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