TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Don Graham’

Graham, Hunt, Woodruff Dine in Teatro’s ‘Power Booth’

teatrogoldoni.jpeg.png

Spotted at Washington’s downtown upscale eatery Teatro Goldoni Wednesday night at about 10 p.m. were WaPo’s CEO Don Graham, Bloomberg’s Al Hunt and his wife, Judy Woodruff, of PBS’s “The Newshour” with Jim Lehrer. They sat in what the publicist of Teatro Goldoni calls a “power booth.”

Power booth 5, as it’s dubbed, “is where the heavy hitters sit”. The late Jack Valenti (longtime head of the Motion Picture Association) often sat there. Democratic radio host Bill Press has sat there as has Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.).

All those dining at table 5 Wednesday night appeared to be in fine spirits.

Can This Geek Save WaPo? We Thought DC-ers Were Nerds…

That’s the question posed by Washingtonian mag this month, referring to WaPo‘s chief digital officer Vijay Ravindran. Funny, I thought we all agreed after the RTCA dinner that DC’ers were nerds…

Harry Jaffe reports Don Graham and WaPo are putting some of their last best hopes on Ravindran, the paper’s first “chief digital officer.”

Ravindran has been on the job four months, so it’s too soon for a plan to save newspapering. But his installation in the Post Company’s upper echelon is a sign of CEO Don Graham’s willingness to experiment-and his desperation.

Ravindran was the force behind WaPo’s recent launch on Facebook and he’ll contine to work with Washingtonpost.com’s Goli Sheikholeslami and Roger Andelin and Newsweek.com’s Geoff Reiss to expand WaPo‘s online presence.

Read the rest of Jaffe’s profile here.

WaPo Journos Lunching With Ravindran

Don Graham has been holding journo lunch meetings for Vijay Ravindran, WaPo’s chief digital officer. According to Washingtonian, the lunches are being held to ramp up the former Amazon exec. on the business of news.

WaPo’s Liz Spayd, Joel Achenbach, Dana Milbank, Ian Shapira, Jose Antonio Vargas, Mike Wilbon, Jason LaCanfora, Dan Steinberg, Stephen Hills and David Plotz of Slate met with Ravindran at the last luncheon.

Most surprising is the one person that hasn’t hit Graham’s lunches… Check out Washingtonian’s Capital Comment blog for the full scoop.

Morning Reading List 03.26.09

Good Morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Its day 66 covering the Obama administration and week eight for us. Happy Birthday to Bob Woodward (h/t Playbook). What we know and what we’re reading this Thursday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | RADIO | ONLINE | MAGAZINES | NEWS NOTES | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

NEWPAPERS

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution said yesterday it will cut its full-time news staff by about 90 people, or nearly 30 percent, to lower costs as it tries to regain profitability amid a severe revenue slump. The company will also eliminate distribution to seven more metro Atlanta counties.

Well somebody in this newspaper business is still doing well. WaPo Co. Chief Don Graham racked up his 18th year without a salary raise in 2008. But he earned a bonus nearly doubling the value of his total compensation package.

TV

From Politico: The president at a DNC fund-raiser last night, channeling Dan Pfeiffer: “I know it can be easy especially in Washington to get caught up in the day to day chatter of cable television, to be distracted by the petty and the trivial, and to fall into the trap of keeping score about who’s up and who’s down. There will be days we may be declared the winner; days when the umpires say oh they lost that one; there will be days when the markets go up; there will be days when the markets go down.”

Speaking of cable, the top 35 ad-supported cable networks are up 7 percent in total viewers this season, according to a report based on Nielsen Media Research data. It shows Fox News and MSNBC among the cable networks posting large first-quarter audience gains in prime time.

NBC has instituted an across-the-board freeze on raises for its executives and talent, even those with contracts guaranteeing them salary bumps. NBC News — and probably all of NBC Universal — is discreetly calling around and asking its on-air and off-air employees to take one for the team.

With Mexico in the headlines of late, President Obama will talk directly to a massive Hispanic audience when he makes an historic appearance on Premio Lo Nuestro, Univision’s longest-running and most popular music awards show today.

RADIO

WTOP’s Mark Plotkin got into it with Terry McAuliffe at the Capital Grille Tuesday evening, but all in good fun, Reliable Sources assures us.

ONLINE

NY Observer warns us of our competition. Dan Abrams wants in on the media blogging and aggregation business. For the past several months, Abrams has been meeting with various NY-based media reporters, editors, and bloggers about the potential editorial venture. To date, nobody has signed on.

MAGAZINES

Managing Editor Richard Stengel on Time’s cover story by Kurt Andersen “The End of Excess: Why this crisis is good for America,” via Playbook: “I believe Kurt’s cover this week will be the defining piece that comes out of this economic crisis. It is not only smart, but wise. He starts out by saying we all knew this was coming and then charts the cycles of American history in a way that historians can only envy… From when this all began, I thought Kurt could become the poet laureate of the crisis — he’s one of the few writers of our time who can unite popular culture, history, and economics and with this piece he proves it.”

There goes one of my vices. The consumer appetite for celebrity news has exploded in recent years, but shortsighted strategies, poor management, and the recession have hit traditional celebrity media hard — so hard experts say celeb mags may not survive the economic crisis.

NEWS NOTES

Its the President v. the Press on the Daily Beast.

Jay Rosen: As the crisis in newspaper journalism grinds on, people watching it are trying to explain how we got here, and what we’re losing. Lately, the pace has picked up. Here are twelve links to recent pieces about this process that form a kind of flying seminar on the future of news, presented in real time.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro; Romenesko

REVOLVING DOOR and JOBS after the jump.

Read more

A Few Un-Observant Observer Details

An eagle-eyed reader brings to our attention some missteps in the Observer’s recent profile of Katharine Weymouth.

Among them:

  • Misspelling Katharine Graham (“Unlike her grandmother, Katherine Graham, … “)

  • “Katharine Weymouth, the most powerful person at The Washington Post”…You mean more powerful than Don Graham?

  • Len Downie did not take the buyout… (“Those who took them included superstars like its longtime editor Len Downie…”)

  • And why no mention of Don Graham here? “It was her family—chiefly, Phil Graham, her grandfather, and later his wife, Katharine, who made The Washington Post a quality newspaper. For the past half century, they have molded and shaped it. It was they who brought the paper public; they who established its national and international profile.”

  • Re: this…”Unlike her grandmother, Katherine Graham, she did not set aside her wifely duties to take on the intimidating business of running a newspaper…” Um, Katharine Graham was a widow…

  • Live-Blogging: Downie Interview

    DownieLen_L.jpgWe’re at Nathans Georgetown right now and live-blogging the “Q&A Cafe” interview of Washington Post Executive Editor Len Downie, Jr. by host Carol Joynt. (In chronological order)

  • Sitting with Jim Kimsey, Victoria Michaels and Pam Sorensen (with whom, one’s thirst can be quenched) before the interview, Downie confesses to them that both he and Don Graham read the Sports section first thing in the morning (not together natch…). He also brags about the number of comics in the Washington Post and how it compares with other papers.
  • Says Downie to the table: “I figure that the people who interview ought to subject themselves to interviews once in a while.”
  • Ben Bradlee put a whoopee cushion under Downie’s seat. Just kidding.
  • Downie’s working on his beach figure, declining the food and saying “I don’t need to eat that much anyway.”
  • Joynt, referring to the Post’s Pulitzer sweep, says “It’s certainly been a good week for Len Downie and the Washington Post.” (applause) “I planned this allthe way along,” she jokes. “The DC Madam last spring, Len Downie this spring.” (laughter)
  • He’s explaining to the table how the paper comes to me…editorial meeting…what gets put on the website…what holds for the paper, etc. “Starting about 4 in the afternoon, I leave my office and go to the news desk in the news room….People start lobbying us. … We talk and discuss various things and start to make decisions.” I like to walk around I walk around and visit people. … I usually work until about 8 o’clock.”
  • Beach figure be damned: Downie digs into his lunch.
  • On the website: “It’s doing really well. We have about 15 million unique visitors doing well. 10 million page views a day. It’s doing very well. It’s really increased our readership and what I really like is all the multimedia stuff.”
  • Is the Internet a threat? “We used to think so. … I no longer think of us as a newsroom. I think of us as a multimedia newsroom. … The print audience is shrinking as the web audience grows.”
  • “I’m really amazed at how many people listen to our podcasts,” said Downie. “A lot of our podcasts are tops on iTunes and that really surprises me, it really does.”
  • “We’re still working on how to best deliver our content to handheld devices.”
  • Interview begins…
  • Joynt: “Did you ever think you would win in a group that included Bob Dylan.” (Laughter) Downie: “Ha, no I didn’t.”
  • Referring to how the Virginia Tech reporters donated their prize to charity, Downie joked, “We have other ways of rewarding them.”
  • The Pulitzer Public Service award is his favorite, “because that’s why we’re in this business: To service the public.”
  • “I call Steve Pearlstein ‘The Scold’ because, like me, he’s always scolding everyone.”
  • On Jo Becker, who left for the New York Times: “We’ll still get her back somehow.” Referring to Becker’s husband, Serge Kovaleski, who was a key decision to move to New York, “We call him the ‘Traitor’ in the newsroom.”
  • Referring to Becker/Bart Gellman’s “Cheney” series: “At first we didn’t like that story … we thought it’d be too hard to do.”

    More after the jump…

    Read more

  • Morning Reading List, 12.20.07

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. On this day in 2002, Sen. Trent Lott resigned as Senate Majority Leader.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You think card games are “much fun.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • A reader wonders, “Where did the Washington Times Christmas tree go? It was there but now it’s gone”

  • NPF president Bob Meyers writes, “Last year you supported us with many contributions so we could meet our Challenge Grant obligations. This year the challenge is equally important, but we’re doing this on our own, without any challenge grant to spur us on. … Could you help with a $25 contribution? A $50 contribution? We’re a 501-c-3, so you could deduct your gift. I’ve added a connection to our magical online giving icon (you can find it on our site as well).” For more info, click here.

  • FCC Eases Ownership Limits for Big Media

  • Politico has a caucus night bingo game for readers (no, it is not a drinking game, although we find that hard to believe).

  • New York Times Sees Boost from Web Sites

  • Tribune CEO Expected to Step Down in Buyout

  • From a Post insider: “what frustrates so many post reporters about today’s nytimes piece on the bacon fiasco is that, yet again, downie does not explain how editors edited the story and does not address the criticisms of the piece. instead, he takes the easy way out and defends the notion that young people can be big reporters too. he’s permitting daly to divert the discussion away from the real journalistic issue. he should have come out and explained what was wrong with the story, what was right with the story, and what the post will do to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

  • PEJ reports, “Americans received a grim picture of the war in Iraq in the first 10 months of 2007. Daily violence accounted for 47% of the stories studied. And of the stories that offered an assessment of the direction of the war, most were pessimistic, according to a new study of press coverage from Iraq from January to October.”

  • Newsday, Hoy to Pay $15 Million in Circ Case

  • Also from Pew, “Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public’s top news stories in 2007. Nearly half of Americans (45%) tracked news about the shootings at Virginia Tech University very closely, while nearly as many paid very close attention to reports on the Minneapolis bridge collapse and the California wildfires.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “After weeks of bad news, Hillary Clinton and her strategists hoped that winning the endorsement of Iowa’s largest newspaper last weekend might produce a modest bump in their media coverage. But on Sunday morning, they awoke to upbeat headlines about their chief Democratic rival: ‘Obama Showing New Confidence With Iowa Sprint,’ said the New York Times. ‘Obama Is Hitting His Stride in Iowa,’ said the Los Angeles Times. And on Monday, Clinton aides were so upset about a contentious ‘Today’ show interview that one complained to the show’s producer. Clinton’s senior advisers have grown convinced that the media deck is stacked against them, that their candidate is drawing far harsher scrutiny than Barack Obama. And at least some journalists agree.”

  • Washington Post reports, Don Graham, “The chairman of The Washington Post Co., who separated from his wife last month, just closed on a 1896 semi-detached townhouse near Dupont Circle. The four-bedroom, four-bath Tudor underwent extensive work during the past year and is described as impeccable.” Ed Note: Wait, Post ombudsman Deb Howell says that Don Graham’s divorce isn’t appropriate for the Style section (it went in Business) but his house sales are?

  • CJR reports, “In an otherwise reasonable and spirited defense of a reporter, The Washington Post’s Leonard Downie Jr. trips by employing ad hominem attack and innuendo against a critic—the very tactics Downie seeks to criticize.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Capitol Steps founder Bill Strauss was a Harvard-trained lawyer and Senate subcommittee staffer when he broke through the chrysalis of Capitol Hill conventionality to become a musical satirist. Mr. Strauss, who died Dec. 18 of pancreatic cancer at his home in McLean, recalled the breakthrough in a phone interview shortly before his death at age 60.”

  • Politico reports, “New York Times columnist Frank Rich regularly chides political journalists for not thinking outside the Beltway in covering the presidential campaign. But what about venturing beyond the west side of Manhattan? Unlike his Times opinion-writing colleagues — Maureen Dowd, David Brooks and Gail Collins — Rich has yet to rack up an Iowa dateline this year, not to mention New Hampshire or South Carolina.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Inside the pressure-cooker that is live television, the name Barack Obama apparently becomes tricky.
    The Democratic presidential candidate’s name has been confused with the terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and even Omaha, Neb., in separate occasions on CNN recently.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • “2007 Ratings: MSNBC has ‘Fastest Growing Primetime Lineup of any Top-50 Cable Channel,’” reports TVNewser.

  • TVNewser reports, “Bob Schieffer: 2008 Campaign Probably ‘My Last In The Role I Have Now’”

  • TVNewser reports, “You may have noticed World News with Charles Gibson and World News Now have been broadcasting form a different location this week. We are hearing construction is underway for a new set which is expected to debut in the next couple of weeks. We’re told the new set will also be HD-ready and that the Gibson broadcast is expected to be in HD sometime in 2008.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “CNN’s Jonathan Klein on Campbell Brown, Couch Potatoes and Plans for 2008″

  • Wonkette reports, “Joe Scarbrough and Friend Ridicule Huckabee’s Jesusery”

  • TVNewser reports, “Gore Vidal Has Beef With Wolf Blitzer, Apparently”

  • TVNewser reports, “The cable nets continue breaking news coverage of a fire at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, which is part of the White House complex. Of the three cable news nets, CNN was first with the news at 9:42:30. MSNBC was next at 9:43:10 and FNC reported the story at 9:44:40.” Meanwhile, on broadcast, “ABC News’ Chris Cuomo anchored a network special at 9:51amET on the fire at the EEOB. The NBC network continued with the third hour of the today show and aired a special report at 10amET (MSNBC was already in breaking news coverage of the fire). CBS reported the fire with an update to the west coast feed of The Early Show at 10amET”

  • TVNewser reports, “In an opinion column in USA Today, titled ‘Does Al-Jazeera belong in the USA?’, Souhelia Al-Jadda, an associate producer at Link TV’s Mosaic: World News from the Middle East and a member of USA Today’s board of contributors, laments the fact that more than one year after the launch of Al-Jazeera English, ‘no major U.S. cable or satellite company is willing to carry the station.’”

  • Inside Cable News reported yesterday, “Bloomberg TV announced this morning that Terry Holt and Stephanie Cutter will be providing analysis for the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary.”

  • A CNN release announced, “The next stops for the CNN Election Express include Iowa for the state’s upcoming caucuses, New Hampshire for the nation’s first primary elections and visits to Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Los Angeles for CNN’s remaining presidential primary debates. To date, the CNN Election Express has served as the studio for interviews with top presidential candidates including Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.), former Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-Ark.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). The studio configuration includes a lighting grid with full power to allow quick set-up for interviews. The video equipment on board can also be used outside for interviews and live shots.”

  • TVNewser reports, “The NewsHour Gets New Set, Goes HDTV”

  • TVNewser reports, “It was good news all around for CNN yesterday, with a re-up for CNN/U.S. President Jon Klein and a memo from CNN Worldwide president Jim Walton discussing all the “fun” the network is having.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Once again, Obama has been confused with Osama. This time, by HLN’s Glenn Beck on Good Morning America.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Comcast Says FCC Limit Rule Is ‘Perverse’

  • FCC Accepts Google’s Auction Application

  • Check out www.2008ElectionProCon.org, “created to be a comprehensive source of information on the 2008 presidential election.” The site has “compiled the pro and con positions of all the presidential candidates on major policy issues, along with other resources related to the election, like a printable one-page summary of all the candidates’ positions on the issues and a history of political parties. All of the information is designed to help people determine for themselves which candidate would make the best president.”

  • A reader writes in, “Have you seen www.Whitehouse.com lately? (not .gov, BTW). Yes it is the same URL that was once the famed porn site. Now it has been reborn as some kind of uber-hip political blog. And word on the street is they’ve been phoning up reporters and inviting them to come and start work…resume, clips and references sight unseen. The site boasts 10 years of tradition (doesn’t mention that 9.5 of them are as a porn site)…and check out the ‘benefits’ page! 25 cent soft drinks and occasional Pizza Fridays!”

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein writes, “How can I say this nicely? Oh, what the heck. If Ted Leonsis is going to be candid and bash mainstream media, then why can’t I? It’s not like I need a job. At this point in my career, I’d only be bought out at best or downsized in a restructuring at worst.”

  • A release announced, “Alive in Baghdad, a web news program reported and filmed by local Iraqis and distributed by independent US news agency Small World News lost correspondent Ali Shafeya Al-Moussawi after he was killed over the weekend in Sadr City. The correspondent was found dead by a family member after being shot 31 times. Details as to motive and circumstances about the killing are undetermined.”

  • Check out the “major design” of Bloggingheads.tv.

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • A Democracy release announced, “It’s not chestnuts roasting on an open fire or ringing sleigh bells, but Christmas came early (or Hannukah came late) to Democracy this December. Just after we had released our winter issue and thought things would be winding down for the year, we were notified that Democracy has been named the Best New Publication of 2007 by the Utne Independent Press Awards.” For more on the awards, click here.

  • Check out a new video feature on newyorker.com, The Naked Campaign, “a series of short videos featuring the illustrator Steve Brodner as he draws the Presidential candidates and discusses the race for the White House. The videos are directed by Gail Levin, with animation by Asterisk.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Carl Kasell — the National Public radio newscaster and the judge/scorekeeper/second banana on NPR’s weekly call-in quiz show ‘Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me!’ — is running late for an interview. … Mr. Kasell, who’ll be moonlighting next week as the announcer for the 30th annual “Kennedy Center Honors” broadcast, was recording an answering machine message for a ‘Wait, Wait’ winner. Such is the highly coveted prize for callers who triumph in events like ‘Listener Limerick Challenge,’ ‘Bluff the Listener,’ and ‘Who’s Carl This Time?’ — wherein Mr. Kasell delivers highly flavored imitations of newsmakers from Paris to Britney to George W. and all points and poobahs in between.”

    Top of post

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Amos Snead is stepping down as Press Secretary to House Republican Whip Roy Blunt and is returning to FD Dittus.

  • Salon finally admits that Michael Scherer is leaving. Joan Walsh writes, “Some of you may have noticed the change to Michael Scherer’s bio at the bottom of his great Meghan McCain profile today, identifying him as our ‘former’ Washington correspondent. I’m sad to say that Michael has left us to cover the presidential campaign for Time magazine. He’s been a crucial part of our news resurgence over the last two years, breaking stories on Abu Ghraib, George Allen’s race problems and the 2008 presidential campaign. We miss him already. But we’re thrilled to welcome Mike Madden, who has covered politics, Congress and Washington for Gannett News Service since 2000. Mike has also written for Time.com, the New York Observer, USA Today and Wonkette, and he’ll join Walter Shapiro on the campaign trail shortly.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Society for HR Management is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • NewsUSA is seeking a Feature Writer.

  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is looking for a Washington Bureau Reporter.

  • PBS is looking for a Director, PBS Engage.

  • Heldref Publications is looking for a Marketing and Advertising Director.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You say “no way in hell” to group houses.

  • Stephen Manfredi, a Senior Account Executive with Shirley & Banister Public Affairs, has accepted a position at the White House as Associate Director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives.

  • Washington Post’s Ruth Marcus writes, “It’s not as if this president has been Mr. Openness. But by some important measures, George W. Bush is more accessible to the reporters who cover him than are some of the leading candidates to succeed him — most notably Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.”

  • The Statesman reports,Jim Lehrer sticks up for traditional media at UT”

  • A release announced, “Twin Cities Strategies, a special events and consulting firm serving clients for the 2008 Republican National Convention, today announced its partnership with Hoffman Communications, the Midwest’s premier events management and production company. The TCS/Hoffman partnership provides corporations, trade associations and state Republican Parties with the most effective, one-stop-shop for all of their 2008 RNC Convention events, media, strategic consulting and public relations needs.”

  • A release announced, “Acorn Media Group, a leading independent global media company, announces Bruce Belliveau as its Chief Financial Officer and Mark Stevens as its President of Acorn Media U.S. effective this month. Stevens replaces John Lorenz who was promoted to Vice Chairman. Far outpacing industry growth, Acorn Media Group continues to grow rapidly. The company projects $80 million in global sales from its four divisions in 2007, an increase of 33% over 2006.”

  • Washingtonian reports, “It’s official: Don Graham ‘gets it,’ perhaps more than any other big newspaper publisher.
As in ‘gets the Internet.’… This week Graham alerted Posties that their work is now part of Facebook, the social networking site that is drawing eyeballs across the globe. His e-mail introduced the new ‘widget’ to Post employees on Halloween night.”

  • A release announces, “From November 8 through 11, Jim Lehrer, anchor of The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS, will lead a national conversation entitled Dialogues in Democracy: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness, as part of MacNeil/Lehrer Productions’ By the People project. The conversations — exploring the rights, responsibilities and expectations of American citizens — will occur in the historic buildings of Colonial Williamsburg, a seminal site of American democracy and citizenship. The final convocation, at which the ‘Declaration of Citizenship for the 21st Century’ will be debated, will take place in Colonial Williamsburg’s Capitol in the Hall of the House of Burgesses, where the founding generation produced the first comprehensive Declaration of Rights.”

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio will launch a channel dedicated to the music of rock icons Led Zeppelin on 11/8. ‘XM LED: The Led Zeppelin Channel’ (XM-59) will feature the band’s complete audio catalog, interviews with band members, and other ‘unique content that celebrates the musical contributions of Led Zeppelin.’”

  • CNN Money reports, “Fitch Ratings said it believes the Hollywood writers’ strike has limited impact on the credit profile of the media and entertainment sector over the short-term.”

  • FishbowlLA reports, “Dan Cox informs us that he’s moved from the weirdly exciting California gubernatorial referendum of a few years back to cover a political race even more enthralling: Sixth-grade class president.”

  • Associated Press reports, “New York magazine agreed Tuesday to stop accepting sex ads after the local chapter of the National Organization for Women threatened protests outside the offices of the popular weekly publication.”

  • A release announced, “Bonneville DC’s Talk Radio 3WT (1500 AM, 820 AM, 107.7 FM) adds ‘The Stephanie Miller Show’ to its lineup, starting tonight at 7 p.m. Miller will be heard regularly on 3WT weekdays from 7-9 p.m.”

  • Tonight on Nightline, “correspondent Jake Tapper travels to Iowa where he talks to GOP candidate Rudy Giuliani.

  • Multichannel News reports, “Access Intelligence said Tuesday that it will fold 18-year-old industry publication Cable World in December.”

  • Dan Steinberg writes, “So this is a fun tale of media intrigue, media carping and the effort to deliver raw, unfiltered content without the interference of ‘a 26-year old reporter that really doesn’t know necessarily what’s really going on.’ If you find media covering media about media coverage insufferably boring, move right along, stat.” If you are uo for the rest, click here.

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner Inc’s AOL said on Wednesday it will buy Internet advertising technology company Quigo to bolster its ad force and make it more competitive with Google Inc and Yahoo Inc.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Add another item to the list of changes that the Murdoch era could usher in for The Wall Street Journal. Since March 2004, The Journal has maintained an exclusive partnership with the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House with which the paper collaborates on Journal-themed reference guides, crossword puzzle collections and some of the nonfiction books written by its reporters. To date, they’ve collaborated on at least 12 books, among them The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Business of Life, The Wall Street Journal Complete Identity Theft Guidebook and The Price of Admission, by The Journal’s former Boston deputy bureau chief Daniel Golden.”

  • Tech Confidential reports, “The American Antitrust Institute fired off a white paper Tuesday arguing that Google Inc.’s pending $3.1 billion agreement to acquire DoubleClick Inc. will hurt competition in the online advertising market.”

    Jobs

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Specialist, Renewals.

  • Smithsonian Publications is looking for an Associate Editor, Air & Space Magazine.

  • Meltwater Group Inc. (Media Monitoring Company) is looking for an International Management Trainee.

  • Baltimore Business Journal is looking for an Editorial Researcher.

  • Kiplinger’s Personal Finance is looking for an Investment Writer.

  • Elsevier is looking for an Experienced Association Editor.

  • The New Physician is seeking an associate editor.

  • U.S. Grains Council is looking for a Manager of Communications.

  • Culpeper Star-Exponent is looking for a Reporter.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a reporter.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Community news editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.01.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington. This is the longest Morning Reading List in FishbowlDC history.

  • You think Tim Russert should be The Joker.

  • ABC announced, “During a week dominated by news of the fires in Southern California, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54. For the week, the ABC broadcast averaged 8.95 million Total Viewers and a 2.3/9 among key demo viewers. This marks ‘World News” highest delivery in both categories in eight months (week of 2/26/07).”

  • Joe Kildea has left ABC’s “This Week.”

  • The Politico announced a new staffer. “Jeffrey Ressner, who will be reporting for Politico — from L.A. — on the nexus of Hollywood and politics, wrote and/or edited for publications including L.A. Weekly, Hollywood Reporter, Rolling Stone, Us Weekly and Time Magazine.”

  • More Halloween costumes, from Playbook:

      MORE COSTUMES: Riley was a kangaroo. J.T. was a fireman. Rob was Sarkozy, complete with aviators and French flag lapel pins, carrying a baguette. Lily was a pink witch/princess, and stole the show on M Street. Richard was Malcolm X. Tom Toles had a wide stance. Matt David was Papa Smurf and Kildea was Baby Smurf. Dana Milbank had a very short green dress with fishnets and a black wig.

    And…

      The Playbook “Best Costume” award goes to Rajiv Chandrasekaran, who went as a GRATEFUL IRAQI, wearing an Iraqi Olympic jacket and handing out candy.

  • A release announced, “The Society of American Travel Writers
    announced winners of the Aaron D. Cushman Travel Public Relations award at their convention in Manchester, England on October 6. Among the top honors, the Gold Award for Best Publicity for a Single Entity or National Brand, went to Willard 2006 — A Hotel’s Legacy, A Nation’s History — Barbara Bahny-David, Director of Public Relations for the Willard InterContinental — on behalf of Willard 2006.”

  • Check out FishbowlNY’s full coverage of the 2007 American Magazine Conference.

  • Gridskipper Washington D.C has a D.C. Punk Crawl, the Best Cheap Italian Restaurants and the Suburban Girl’s Guide to Shopping in the District.

  • You have to be major for ‘Meet’

  • A release announced, “Entrepreneur Risë Birnbaum is being honored as one of the Washington Business Journal’s 2007 “Women Who Mean Business.” Her company, Z Communications Co. (better known as zcomm), was recently recognized by the same publication as one of the top 15 public relations agencies by revenue in the D.C. Metro area.”

  • Did you miss the Center for Responsive Politics’ Massie Ritsch on Comedy Central’s “Colbert Report” Tuesday night. Check out the video on Conmedy Central’s website.

  • His Extreme-ness says, “The Note’s Insidery Readers Are So Jaded And Cynical These Days”

  • The new Onion book, Our Dumb World, went on sale Tuesday.

  • A release announced, “Maria Hinojosa, award-winning journalist and host of NPR’s Latino USA, will be the featured speaker at the next Latino Leaders Luncheon Series, taking place from 12:00 pm-2:00 pm on Tuesday, November 6th at the Capital Hilton Presidential Ballroom, 1001 16th Street, NW, in Washington, DC. The series is a quarterly event hosted by Latino Leaders Networkâ„¢ and founder, Mickey Ibarra, to provide a platform for prominent Latino leaders to share their personal story of obstacles overcome to achieve success.”

  • PEJ News Coverage Index for October 21-26 shows, “The wildfires that raged in Southern California last week featured numerous tales of bravery, tragedy, and plenty of missing pets. But one reason the disaster became such a major story was that journalists couldn’t resist raising the comparison—fair or not—with the 2005 fiasco on the Gulf Coast.”

  • PRNewser has the details Pat Philbin’s going-away. Check it out here, here and here.

  • From The Huffington Post: “FEMA Offers New Guidelines Governing Press Conferences That Look Suspiciously Like The Old Guidelines That Should Have Governed Press Conferences In The First Place”

  • Christina Bellantoni is doing regular stints on Tony Kornheiser’s show talking about ’08 politics.

  • Huffington Post reports, “In recent weeks, Republican presidential candidates have found time in their busy schedules to speak or debate before the Republican Jewish Coalition, “Value Voters,” conservative Floridians, even Wyoming Republicans, who hold virtually no sway in the primary race. They’ve also agreed to appear at the CNN/YouTube debate they at one point shunned. But it appears that some GOP frontrunners are once again letting an opportunity to appear before African-American voters lapse, just as they decided to sit out a black voter forum hosted last month by Tavis Smiley. The Congressional Black Caucus Institute announced in September that it had scheduled a debate for November 4 on Fox News for Republican presidential candidates. But a spokeswoman for the group confirmed to the Huffington Post that it has now been postponed, with no new date set.”

  • A release announced that yesterday marked, “the official relaunch of the Nightline webcast which will be featured on ABCNews.com, ABC News Now, and iTunes.”

  • From a reporter who wishes to remain anonymous: “as one of the few journalists in town who does not believe russert walks on water, i have to say he did a good job last night at finally getting under hrc’s skin. the fact that she is now calling his demeanor unprofessional is absurd and quite telling about her thin skin…”

  • A tipster asks, “what is benjamin wallace-wells doing on the front of the post?”

  • For anyone wondering why Politico’s Crypt logo has changed, it’s because it is a group effort, of more than eight reporters, and they could not fit all those caricature on the box. Seriously.

  • Jossip tells us how to “Dress Up As Your Favorite Media Meanie.” Ok, so a day late, but stil funny.

  • The Guardian’s Cory Doctorow writes, “It’s all the rage these days: crackpot proposals to automatically police the internet for copyright violations, stopping them even before they occur. From YouTube’s promise to find and stamp out copyright infringing uploads to the counterproposal from the motion picture studios and Microsoft to find and stamp out infringing uploads, everyone is getting in on the act. The problem is, it’s all lies, wishful thinking and irresponsible promises.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Portfolio.com has tapped Larry Kramer, founder of MarketWatch, as a Web consultant for the next few months.”

  • “The Parents Television Council released its annual ranking of the 20 most popular prime time broadcast television shows among children ages 2-17, based on Nielsen Media Research rankings. … Of the 20 shows most-watched by children, only seven were scripted series, and six of those appeared on the worst list. Fox’s Family Guy was named the worst program for young audiences.” For the full result, click here.

  • The Nation announced that the magazine’s syndication policy at the magazine has changed; all rights and syndication are now handled by Agence Global.

  • Pajamas Media “announced actor Ron Silver, author Dr. Phyllis Chesler, and cultural critic Roger Kimball as new PajamasXpress bloggers. These contributors now have a permanent space at PajamasMedia.com where readers can view their most recent web postings on a range of issues and current events and engage them in conversation.”

  • A release announced, “Society of Professional Journalists, National Arab American Journalists Association join forces”

  • TV Decoder reports,Brian Lamb Says an Award for Him Is an Award for Us All”

  • A release announced, “The Hollywood Reporter … announced the release of Hollywood Reporter Direct, a free and easy-to-install application that provides subscribers with immediate and exclusive delivery of customized news, alerts and video from The Hollywood Reporter directly to their desktop. With this launch, The Hollywood Reporter becomes one of the first news outlets in the U.S. to offer this kind of desktop news delivery system to its global readership.”

  • A reader writes asks, “Uh, is the ‘Time 100′ peer-reviewed or something? Aren’t ALL magazine lists essentially subjective and built-to-entertain/sell-ads?”

  • Market Watch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The clever host of Comedy Central’s ‘The Colbert Report’ is holding the usually clear-eyed media in the palm of his hand and bringing out the worst in some star-struck journalists who should know better.”

  • Washington Times reports, “Comcast this week debuted its Digital Voice service in Frederick County, Md., making the cable provider’s ‘triple play’ — cable, Internet and phone services –available to subscribers there.”

  • Poynter Online answers the burning question, “What Does a ‘Data Delivery Editor’ Do?”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “If you harbor a sneaking suspicion that the 2008 campaign is all about Hillary, you’re right”

  • Advertising Age announced, “Advertising Age unveils its annual A-List, where we name the year’s top 10 magazines. Womens’ magazines dominate this year’s list, as titles that focus on home, health, hunger and handbags all found a place, as did one British newsweekly. Other awards include editor of the year, launch of the year and publishing company of the year, which can be found in this special report.”

  • E&P reports, “News coverage of the 2008 presidential campaign has centered predominantly on just five candidates, offered very little information about their public records or what they would do in office, and focused more than 60% of stories on political and tactical aspects of the race, according to a joint study released Monday.”

  • The New York Times’ Kit Seelye covers Huffington Post’s OffTheBus presidential campaign citizen journalism project.

  • We hear the following people will be Note at tonight’s Time magazine party for Mark Halperin’s “The Page”: Managing Ed Richard Stengel, Wash Bureau Chief Jay Carney, TIME.com Managing Editor Josh Tyrangiel, Mark Halperin, Sen Sherrod Brown, Ron Brownstein, Sen Bob Corker, Tom DeLay, Rep Rahm Emanuel, Mandy Grunwald, Tammy Haddad, Jim Jordan, Chris Matthews, Sen Robin McCain, Terry McCullough, Norah O’Donnell, Kevin Sheekey, George Stephanopoulos, Howard Wolfson and Judy Woodruff.

  • Hotline has finally finally hired a new On Call Editor in Jennifer Skalka.

  • Mark your calendars! NPR Music is set to launch November 5.

  • Check out Carol Joynt’s latest edition of the Washington Social Diary.

  • The HealthCentral Network, Inc. “announced that breast cancer survivor Laura Zigman, a best-selling author regarded as the progenitor of the ‘Chick Lit’ genre, will join MyBreastCancerNetwork.com as an expert.”

  • A reader writes in, “Know who’s a big winner in Microsoft’s investment in Facebook that values the company at $15 billion? The WashPost’s Don Graham, who was an early investor in Facebook”

  • New York Times reports, “The Fox News Channel sent notices to the campaigns of the leading Republican presidential candidates yesterday ordering them to stop using images from their Fox appearances in campaign advertisements.”

  • Place your bid for an “Amazing One Month Internship with Harper’s Bazaar Magazine”

  • Gawker reports, “Last night Graydon Carter’s Waverly Inn was host to a party for Napeolonic media mufti Michael Wolff and former New York mag honcho Caroline Miller’s new project Newser, the web 1.0 news aggregator. Ten years ago, Michael Wolff wrote Burn Rate; it chronicled the spectacular failure of his first web venture, NetGuide. Along the way, Wolff seriously burned his backer Alan Patricof and nearly everybody else he worked with. So when if Newser fails, will there be a Burn Rate II?”

  • Public Eye wonders, “Stephen Colbert, Mock Debater?”

  • Seattle Business Journal reports, “Motivational speaker and corporate-ethics author Lynn Brewer said she will ask USA Today for an apology for its recent article questioning her credentials as an Enron whistle-blower.”

  • CJR reports, “Nightline proves PEJ study right”

  • Inside Cable News has “a chart in Live numbers comparing the channels in Total Day and Primetime in October 2007 to October 2006.”

  • Kansas City Star reports, “Conservative columnist and pundit Robert Novak came to the Dole Institute of Politics on Tuesday to talk about his 50 years covering Washington politics. Novak also made the trip to sign copies of his new book, The Prince of Darkness: 50 Years Reporting in Washington.”

  • The Triangle, Drexel’s newspaper, reports, “Chris Matthews, host and star of news shows Hardball with Chris Matthews and The Chris Matthews Show, was at Drexel University for a book signing early during the day of the Democratic Debate Oct. 30. Matthews held a brief talk in which he addressed the student audience and answered a few questions. He began his address to students with his view of the modern-day political situation.”

  • Connie Lawn is the “skiing White House Reporter.” In addition to writing about politics, she travels and writes intensively about skiing during the season. Much of Connie’s work can be seen on dcski.com.

  • New York Post reports, “AOL and MTV Networks are unveiling new services that will allow consumers to search for and view the lyrics to popular songs. The initiatives are the latest examples of music publishers cashing in on song lyrics by licensing the words to popular tunes for reproduction on Web sites and television.”

  • Fortune introduces us to “Arianna Huffington 2.0″

  • The Associated Press reports, “Plans fell into place Monday for CNN to hold a major Republican debate on Nov. 28, while MSNBC postponed their Nov. 6 debate because of conflicts with the GOP contenders’ schedules.”

  • A release announced, “The Democratic National Convention Committee (DNCC) today announced that Emmy Award winning producer Ricky Kirshner and long-time Democratic Party strategist Mark Squier will serve as Executive Producers for the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver. Together, Kirshner and Squier will craft and implement a program that supports the DNCC’s commitment to bring down the Pepsi Center walls and make this Convention as inclusive, accessible and engaging as possible using new technology and other creative means. As Executive Producers, the pair will be responsible for the overall look and execution of the Convention program including the design, staging, lighting, audio and entertainment.”

  • A release announced, “CNN, YouTube and the Republican Party of Florida … announced that the eight major Republican candidates running for president … will participate in their first-of-its-kind Republican primary debate scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Mahaffey Theatre in St. Petersburg, Fla. CNN’s Anderson Cooper will moderate this program designed to allow voters, no matter where they live, ask questions of the candidates for this country’s highest office.”

  • “Nearly 11 months before anyone could cast a vote, the press had already narrowed the presidential horserace to five candidates. And while the coverage provided ample information on political tactics and fundraising, it offered citizens relatively little information on the candidates’ records or where they proposed to take the country,” according to a joint study released by the Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ) and the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy.

  • What are the biggest social events of the season? Washingtonian tells us.

    Jobs

  • The Gazette is looking for Staff writers

  • mergermarket is looking for an energetic DC-based reporter.

  • Kiplinger’s Personal Finance is looking for a Circulation Manager.

  • Spectrum Science Communications is looking for a Healthcare PR Account Supervisor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Happy Birthday, Len!

    The Washington Post newsroom had a surprise birthday celebration for Mr. Downie just moments ago, with a chocolate fountain instead of the usual sheetcake.

    Len seemed genuinely surprised. “As a sign of our fondness for Len, we’re eliminating our mandatory age-65 retirement,” joked Don Graham.

    Len had some nice words about his newsroom family and noted that next month will mark 44 years for him at the Post.

    “Forty-three,” corrected Bob Kaiser (who, of course, had his first summer internship at the Post in 1963, a year before Downie joined him in the intern class of ’64).

    << PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>